Conference Program

Please note:
On this page you will only see the English-language presentations of the conference. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2023 Digital correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "VORTRAG MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

Thema: Testing & Quality

Nach Tracks filtern
Nach Themen filtern
Alle ausklappen
  • Montag
    06.02.
  • Dienstag
    07.02.
  • Mittwoch
    08.02.
  • Donnerstag
    09.02.
, (Montag, 06.Februar 2023)
10:00 - 13:00
Mo 8
Limitiert Balance in Testing
Balance in Testing

Today we must deal with shorter time-to-market, increasing complexity and more agility while keeping quality and other key system properties high.
To address these challenges the right balance in testing w.r.t. independence, timing, automation, and formality is critical but often not explicitly tackled.

Therefore, in this interactive tutorial we reflect on our current approach on balancing testing, investigate and discuss needed strategies, tactics, and practices, and share experiences to improve and sustain our testing approaches!

Max. number of participants: 40

Target Audience: Test Architects, Test Engineers, Product Owners, Quality Managers, Software Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge about testing and quality engineering
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Today we must deal with shorter time-to-market, increasing complexity and more agility while keeping quality and other key system properties high. Our test systems increase in size, volume, flexibility, velocity, complexity, and unpredictability. Additionally, digitalization requires more than just a face lift in testing.

To address these challenges the right balance in testing w.r.t. independence, timing, automation, and formality is critical but often not explicitly tackled. Therefore, in this interactive tutorial we reflect on our current approach on balancing testing, investigate and discuss needed strategies, tactics, and practices in different areas, and share experiences and lessons learned to improve and sustain our testing approaches!

The following areas in testing are covered w.r.t. their appropriate balancing:

  • Level of independence – independent vs. fully integrated with development
  • Timing – too early vs. too late
  • Degree of automation – automated vs. manual
  • Formality – formal vs. informal, scripted vs. exploratory
  • Test case design – structured vs. experience-based, black-box vs. white-box

Peter Zimmerer is a Principal Key Expert Engineer at Siemens AG, Technology, in Munich, Germany. For more than 30 years he has been working in the field of software testing and quality engineering. He performs consulting, coaching, and training on test management and test engineering practices in real-world projects and drives research and innovation in this area. As ISTQB® Certified Tester Full Advanced Level he is a member of the German Testing Board (GTB). Peter has authored several journal and conference contributions and is a frequent speaker at international conferences.

Peter Zimmerer
Peter Zimmerer
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

14:00 - 17:00
Mo 12
Limitiert Approval Testing: Get Legacy Code Under Control
Approval Testing: Get Legacy Code Under Control

Approval testing is a technique that helps you to get a difficult codebase under test and begin to control your technical debt. Approval testing works best on larger pieces of code where you want to test for multiple things and interpreting failures is challenging.

In this hands-on session we'll introduce a commonly-used Approval testing tool for Java and through hands-on exercises learn to get control of some example code. The same tool is also available for many other programming languages, see https://approvaltests.com/

Bring a laptop.
Max. number of participants: 30

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of Java and unit testing, bring a laptop
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:

Introducing Approval Testing (55 minutes)

  • Code Review: examine existing test case, discuss strengths & weaknesses
  • Demonstration: Convert an assertion-based test to use Approval testing
  • Hands-on exercise: Add some tests using Approvals.Java.

Break (5 minutes)

Approval Test Design (50 minutes)

  • Presentation: Approval testing characteristics and design patterns
  • Exercise: Using the default XML printer with Approvals.Java
  • Demonstration: Using scrubbing with an XML printer
  • Discussion: when to print, when to scrub

Printer Design (30 minutes)

  • Exercise: Designing a printer for a domain object
  • Presentation: Case studies
  • Q&A (10 minutes)

Emily Bache is a Technical Coach with ProAgile. She has worked with software development for over 20 years in diverse organizations from start-up to large enterprise. These days Emily specializes in coaching development teams in agile practices like Test-Driven Development, refactoring and agile design. Emily has written two books, authored Pluralsight courses and regularly speaks at software conferences. Originally from the UK, she currently lives in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Twitter: https://twitter.com/emilybache
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emilybache/
Github: https://github.com/emilybache
Website: https://sammancoaching.org/

Emily Bache
Emily Bache
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

14:00 - 17:00
Mo 15
Limitiert Accessibility Workshop to Help Capture Best Practises and Shift Left
Accessibility Workshop to Help Capture Best Practises and Shift Left

How often have you heard that “Yes this is important, but we don’t have the capacity right now” or “sure let’s put it in the backlog”?

At least 1 in 5 people in the UK have a long-term illness, impairment or disability. Many more have a temporary disability. A recent study found that 4 in 10 local council homepages failed basic tests for accessibility.
Bring a laptop.

Max. number of participants: 20

Target Audience: Everyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
How often have you heard that “Yes this is important, but we don’t have the capacity right now” or “sure let’s put it in the backlog”?
This is something we should not brush off or take lightly. Accessibility testing is vital especially when your product is a user facing application.
We need to be socially aware as a team and build quality towards our product with making it more accessible.

At least 1 in 5 people in the UK have a long-term illness, impairment or disability. Many more have a temporary disability. A recent study found that 4 in 10 local council homepages failed basic tests for accessibility.

This is quite vital and the sooner we as testers can advocate this into our teams, we make our product more accessible, reduce the risk of bad product reviews, reputation and also be more socially aware. Let's shift left and make accessibility testing built-in our teams.

  1. create a checklist
  2. look at some plugging (wave, lighthouse, arc toolkit, developer tools)
  3. Screen readers (mac/windows inbuilt)
  4. Have a healthy discussion on what they have learnt in the session and how can we bring accessibility sooner in an SDLC?
     

Laveena Ramchandani is an experienced Testing Consultant with a comprehensive understanding of tools available for software testing and analysis. She aims to provide valuable insights that have high technical aptitude and hopes to inspire others in the world through her work. Laveena holds a degree in Business Computing from Queen Mary University of London and regularly speaks at events on data science models and other topics.

Laveena Ramchandani
Laveena Ramchandani
Vortrag: Mo 15
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Dienstag, 07.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Di 8.1
How (Not) to Measure Quality
How (Not) to Measure Quality

Measuring quality requires many questions to be answered. The most obvious ones may be: “What is quality?”, but also “How can we measure it?”, “Which metrics are most accurate?”, “Which are most practical?”.

In this talk, I share some general motivations for measuring quality. I review commonly used metrics that claim to measure quality, I rate them with regards to how they may be helpful or harmful to achieve actual goals. I give some examples how the weaknesses of one metric might be countered by another one to create a beneficial system.

Target Audience: Developers, Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers, Quality Engineers, Testers, Product Owners
Prerequisites: Basic Software Project Experience, Rough Understanding of Software Development
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Measuring quality requires many questions to be answered. The most obvious ones may be: “What is quality?”, but also “How can we measure it?”, “Which metrics are most accurate?”, “Which are most practical?”.

In my experience, one question is often not answered or postponed until it is too late: “Why do we want to measure quality?” Is it because we want to control how well our developers are performing? Is it to detect problems early? Is it to measure the impact of changes? Is it the product or the process we care about? Is it to improve locally in a single team or globally across the company? Is there a specific problem that we are trying to solve, and if so, which one?

Instead of trying to define what software quality is – which is hard and depends on a lot of factors – we should first focus on the impact of our measuring. Some metrics may work great for one team, but not for the company as a whole. Some will help to reach your team or organizational goal, some will not help at all, and some will even have terrible side effects by setting unintended incentives. Some can be gamed, others might be harmful to motivation. Consider an overemphasis on lead time, which can lead to cutting corners. Or measuring the number of bugs found, which can cause a testers versus developers situation.

In this talk, I share some general motivations for measuring quality. I review various commonly used metrics that claim to measure quality. Based on my experience, I rate them with regards to how they may be helpful or harmful to achieve actual goals and which side effects are to be expected. I give some examples how the weaknesses of one metric might be countered by another one to create a beneficial system.

Michael Kutz has been working in professional software development for more than 10 years now. He loves to write working software, and he hates fixing bugs. Hence, he developed a strong focus on test automation, continuous delivery/deployment and agile principles.
Since 2014 he works at REWE digital as a software engineer and internal coach for QA and testing. As such his main objective is to support the development teams in QA and test automation to empower them to write awesome bug-free software fast.

The State and Future of UI Testing
The State and Future of UI Testing

UI testing is an essential part of software development. But the automation of UI tests is still considered too complex and flaky.
This talk will cover the "state of the art" of UI testing with an overview of tools and techniques. It will be shown which kind of representations are used by today's test tools and how the addressing of elements in the UI is done.
In addition, the role of artificial intelligence in the different approaches is shown and a prediction of testing tools of the future is presented.

Target Audience: Developers, Testers
Prerequisites: Basic Knowledge of UI-Testing
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
UI testing is an essential part of software development. Despite technological progress, the automation of UI tests is still considered too complex to function completely without manual intervention.
In addition to classical selector-based approaches, more and more image-based methods are being pursued.
This talk will cover the "state of the art" of UI testing with an overview of tools and techniques. In particular, current problems and future developments will be discussed. Furthermore, it will be shown which kind of UI representations are used by today's test tools and how the addressing of elements in the user interface is done.
In addition, the role of artificial intelligence in the different approaches is shown and a prediction of testing tools of the future is presented on the basis of current research.

Johannes Dienst is Developer Advocate at askui. His focus is on automation, documentation, and software quality.

Michael Kutz
Johannes Dienst
Johannes Dienst
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

14:00 - 14:45
Di 8.2
Testing AI Systems
Testing AI Systems

At first glance, testing AI systems seems very different from testing “conventional” systems. However, many standard testing activities can be preserved as they are or only need small extensions.

In this talk, we give an overview of topics that will help you test AI systems: Attributes of training/testing/validation data, model performance metrics, and the statistical nature of AI systems. We will then relate these to testing tasks and show you how to integrate them.

Target Audience: Developers, Testers, Architects
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of testing
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
From a testing perspective, systems that include AI components seem like a nightmare at first glance. How can you test a system that contains enough math to fill several textbooks and changes its behavior on the whims of its input data? How can you test what even its creators don’t fully understand?

Keep calm, grab a towel and carry on - what you have already been doing is still applicable, and most of the new things you should know are not as arcane as they might seem. Granted, some dimensions of AI systems like bias or explainability will likely not be able to be tested for in all cases. However, this complexity has been around for decades even in systems without any AI whatsoever. Additionally, you will have allies: Data scientists love talking about testing data.

In this talk, we give an overview of topics that will help you test AI systems: Attributes of training/testing/validation data, model performance metrics, and the statistical nature of AI systems. We will then relate these to testing tasks and show you how to integrate them.

Gregor Endler holds a doctor's degree in Computer Science for his thesis on completeness estimation of timestamped data. His work at Codemanufaktur GmbH deals with Machine Learning and Data Analysis.

Marco Achtziger is a Test Architect working for Siemens Healthcare GmbH in Forchheim. He has several qualifications from iSTQB and iSQI and is a certified Software Architect by Siemens AG.

Gregor Endler, Marco Achtziger
Gregor Endler, Marco Achtziger
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

17:45 - 18:45
Di 8.4
The Shape of Testing, Teams and the World in the Future
The Shape of Testing, Teams and the World in the Future

IT is always changing ... In this talk I'll do some crystal ball gazing from two perspectives. At heart, I’m a tester. For two years I’ve also been a CEO. I’ll look at what factors are at work and what kinds of effects will they have on how we work and the roles of testers and software professionals.

Alongside musings about the future, I’ll talk about concrete activities on an individual and company level to best prepare ourselves for this nebulous future.

Target Audience: Everyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
I’m not the first person to notice that the world is constantly changing and that everything is impermanent. Most especially after the last two years, we have really been forced to come to terms with how quickly and drastically things can change. As IT professionals, we are aware of the intrinsic changeability of projects, contexts and our business, but the events of the last couple of years have put this into sharper focus.

But let’s not get too generally philosophical about the whole world. Let’s look at what is in our more immediate context and perhaps even in our sphere of influence. If our future is anything, it’s nebulous (and I don’t just mean the cloud). How will external changes shape our teams and our work, and how can we shape ourselves proactively in order to be able to respond to changes, make changes or our own and even thrive?

In this talk I’d like to do some triangulated crystal ball gazing from two perspectives. At heart, I’m a tester. For two years I’ve also been a CEO. From my passion for testing and my experience of business and people in organisations, I’ll look at what factors are at work now, what known unknowns we have and what kinds of effects will they have on how we work and the roles of testers and software professionals.
Alongside musings about the future, I’ll talk about concrete activities on an individual and company level to best prepare ourselves for this nebulous future.

Alex Schladebeck ist ein Wirbelwind aus Begeisterung für Qualität, Agilität und Menschen. Aus der anfänglichen Testerrolle ist eine spannende Karriere als Product Owner, Berater und Führungskraft entstanden, bevor sie 2020 Teil der Geschäftsführung bei der Bredex GmbH wurde.
Sie verbringt ihre Zeit in Kommunikation mit verschiedenen Menschen. Dazu gehört Wissensvermittlung durch Workshops und Coaching, Zusammenarbeit mit Entwicklern und Testern, Kundenberatung, Mitarbeiterentwicklung sowie strategische Themen mit anderen Führungskräften umzusetzen. Sie hält sich bei ihrem Lieblingsthemen auf dem Laufenden, indem sie weiterhin Kunden und Teams berät und unterstützt.
Alex spricht häufig auf Konferenzen als Speaker oder Keynote-Speaker über Agilität, Qualitätssicherung und Führung aus Sicht ihrer Erfahrung. In ihrer Freizeit ist sie leidenschaftliche Sportlerin, Musikerin und Tante. Sie beschreibt sich selbst als „explorer“ und liebt es, Orte, Kulturen, Perspektiven und Menschen zu entdecken.

Alex Schladebeck
Alex Schladebeck
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Mittwoch, 08.Februar 2023)
14:30 - 15:30
Mi 8.3
Test-Driven Requirements Engineering: Agile Testing in Practice
Test-Driven Requirements Engineering: Agile Testing in Practice

Requirements engineering like testing require balance of value and risk. Agile requirements engineering and testing with test-driven requirements engineering (TDRE) balances project risks and cost. Clear advantage: Requirements are understandable, testable, and directly applicable as test case. Lead time and costs in testing are reduced by up to thirty percent.

This presentation at OOP 2023 will practically introduce to agile requirements engineering and test with TDRE. A case study demonstrates an industry use of TDRE.

Target Audience: Project Managers, Architects, Analysts, Requirements Engineers, Product Owners, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Requirements engineering like testing require balance. Balance is about balancing value and risk. Requirements must be good enough to mitigate risks but yet not overly specific to contain effort. Same for test, which though never complete needs to address those areas with highest risk.

Requirements engineering and testing belong together. Historically, testers have often only seen the requirements after the system has already been partially implemented. This had two serious disadvantages. On the one hand, insufficient requirements quality came far too late to the table. On the other hand, it was quite a lot of extra work without deriving suitable test cases in the context of requirements definition. A lot of additional work and long correction loops were the result.

Only an agile balance of risk-oriented coverage and testable requirements can improve test effectiveness. Such risk-oriented work also optimizes requirements engineering. Instead of paralysis by analysis in defining numerous requirements, test-driven requirements engineering (TDRE) focusses on specifying what is necessary and of high risk or high value.

TDRE is straight-forward: Test cases are developed in parallel to the requirements. Thus, the feasibility of the requirements is analyzed much faster than in the traditional sequential approach, in which tests are specified relatively late. The test cases are initially described in the same structure as the requirements and as a supplement to the respective requirements. This shifts Test-Driven Development (TDD), which has already proven itself as relevant agile methodology, to the specification level. Regression tests are attributed in order to prepare for later automation. The effort required for testing can be better estimated on this basis, and project and quality risks are thus reduced.
TDRE follows a triple peak model, which is connecting requirements (i.e., needs), design (i.e., solution) and test (i.e., the product).

It intertwines three perspectives:
•    Market perspective: “How can I meet customer satisfaction and needs?”
•    Design perspective: “How can I implement the solution to meet requirements?”
•    Testing perspective: “How can I find a defect and cause the product to fail?”

Here some guidance from our projects, which we will further illustrate in this presentation:
•    Every single functional requirement has at least one acceptance check, which is either fulfilled or not fulfilled and serves as the agile DoD (definition of done).
•    Each individual quality requirement is described with numerical values that can be measured.
•    Business rules are defined so that it can be determined whether they are true or false.
•    Business and data objects are defined with all their attributes, types and states so that they can be set and validated at test time.
•    System interfaces such as GUIs, reports and service interfaces are included in the requirements document so that values can be assigned to them.
•    All use cases have pre- and post-conditions that can be generated and validated.
•    All text is marked so that it can be automatically processed to generate test cases.

Agile requirements engineering and testing with test-driven requirements engineering (TDRE) balances project risks and cost. Clear advantage: Requirements are understandable, testable, and directly applicable as test case. Lead time and costs in testing are reduced by up to thirty percent. This presentation at OOP 2023 will practically introduce to agile requirements engineering and test with TDRE. A case study from medical cybersecurity demonstrates an industry use of TDRE.

Christof Ebert is managing director at Vector Consulting Services. He supports clients around the world in agile transformations. Before he had been working for ten years in global senior management positions. A trusted advisor and a member of several of industry boards, he is a professor at the University of Stuttgart and at Sorbonne in Paris. He authored several books including "Requirements Engineering" published by dPunkt and in China by Motor Press. He is serving on the editorial Boards of "IEEE Software" and "Journal of Systems and Software (JSS)".

Christof Ebert
Christof Ebert
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Donnerstag, 09.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Do 3.1
Use Testing to Develop Better Software Faster
Use Testing to Develop Better Software Faster

As developers, our job is to deliver working software. With the shift to CI/CD and the move to the cloud, the need to have the right feedback at the right time only increases. There are many ways that testing can help us with that. Not only can testing help us verify our solution and prevent us from breaking things, it can also help us design our software, find flaws in our architecture and come up with better solutions. In this talk I will highlight some of the many ways that testing can help you to develop better software faster.

Target Audience: Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in Java
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Testing doesn't always get the attention it deserves in software development. Many developers claim to be bad at it, or are just not that interested. (These may or may not be related.)

As developers, our job is to deliver working software. With the shift to CI/CD and the move to the cloud, the need to have the right feedback at the right time only increases. There are many ways that testing can help us with that. Not only can testing help us verify our solution and prevent us from breaking things, it can also help us design our software, find flaws in our architecture and come up with better solutions.

In this talk I will highlight some of the many ways that testing can help you to develop better software faster.

Marit van Dijk is a software developer with 20 years of experience in different roles and companies. She loves building awesome software with amazing people and has contributed to open source projects like Cucumber and various other projects. She enjoys learning new things, as well as sharing knowledge on programming, test automation, Cucumber/BDD and software engineering. She speaks at international conferences, webinars and podcasts, occasionally writes blog posts and contributed to the book "97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know" (O’Reilly Media).

Micro-Service Delivery without the Pitfalls
Micro-Service Delivery without the Pitfalls

In this session I’ll examine some of the things that can go wrong when organisations jump headfirst into micro-service architectures without understanding the potential pitfalls.

I'll explain contract testing from the ground up. You'll learn how it can decouple micro-service dependencies during development, allowing your teams to work effectively. And I'll describe sophisticated, free, open-source tooling that helps integrate contract testing into your software lifecycle, giving you the confidence to release micro-services independently.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Decision Makers, Release Managers, DevOps
Prerequisites: English, basic software design/architecture, software lifecycle
Level: Advanced

Seb Rose has been a consultant, coach, designer, analyst and developer for over 40 years. He's now Developer Advocate with SmartBear Advantage, promoting better ways of working to the software development community.
Co-author of the BDD Books series "Discovery” and "Formulation" (Leanpub), lead author of “The Cucumber for Java Book” (Pragmatic Programmers), and contributing author to “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” (O’Reilly).

Marit van Dijk
Seb Rose
Seb Rose
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

Zurück