Conference Program

Please note:
On this page you will only see the English-language presentations of the conference. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2023 Digital correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "VORTRAG MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

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  • Montag
    06.02.
  • Dienstag
    07.02.
  • Mittwoch
    08.02.
  • Donnerstag
    09.02.
, (Montag, 06.Februar 2023)
10:00 - 17:00
Mo 1
ScaleAgility: Principles Over Frameworks for Sound Agile Organisations
ScaleAgility: Principles Over Frameworks for Sound Agile Organisations

Do you like some of what you find in the common scaling frameworks but don't buy-in to everything? Then, go to the essence!
This session will present and share a set of principles for scaling, which you can use to roll-your-own approach or properly contextualise the usage of an existing framework such as LeSS, Scrum@Scale or Nexus.

Unlike other scaling approaches, these guidelines are non-prescriptive and recognise the value of elements in many scaling frameworks.

Target Audience: Managers, Decision Makers, Agile Coaches
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of agile. Having been exposed to agile at scale projects is a plus
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
ScaleAgility is a set of principles to create sound scaled organisations.
Devised by a group of five trainers and coaches with a total of more than 70 years of experience in large-scale agile implementations, these principles aim to expose the tensions inherent in any organisational development initiative and provide guidance to discuss and develop strategies and tactics for transforming a company.
In this workshop we will discuss:

  1. A set of general principles to consider when creating large-scale agile organisations
  2. How properly defining products and the way the product definition evolves are fundamental for large-scale agility
  3. A path for Teams to evolve from localised responsibility to feature Teams
  4. How the Leadership should accompany the change

Pierluigi Pugliese is active as Agile Coach, Systemic Consultant and Trainer. He has a long experience in various roles in software development organisations and complex international projects.
He started hacking code so long ago that he cannot remember exactly when anymore. After many years various roles in the mobile telecommunication business, he works as a consultant for software organisations and coach for individuals and teams, focusing on software development and software processes, helping them implementing sound and agile solutions.

Blog: http://www.connexxo.com/blog

Simon Roberts is an agile and leadership coach and Certified Scrum Trainer. He has used lightweight/agile methods since the late 1990s and works with organisations large and small to help them achieve better results by leveraging the power of self-organising teams. He has consulted for and led several large-scale agile transitions at DAX companies in Germany, is the author of several articles and speaks regularly at conferences on the subject of agile leadership. Simon holds an MBA specialising in Creativity, Innovation and Change from the Open University Business School.

Since 2005 Colin Bird is assisting organisations in many sectors to wrestle with the challenges of retaining agility as the scale of the challenge moves beyond a single team.

Pierluigi Pugliese, Simon Roberts, Colin Bird, Matt Roadnight, Jan Olsen
Pierluigi Pugliese, Simon Roberts, Colin Bird, Matt Roadnight, Jan Olsen
Vortrag: Mo 1
Themen: Agilität
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10:00 - 17:00
Mo 4
Software Architecture 101 with Spring Boot
Software Architecture 101 with Spring Boot

This highly interactive workshop is all about software architecture - with Spring Boot, the Java microservice framework. Using an example application, we will discuss and try out the following topics in code:

  • REST API design
  • Hexagonal architecture
  • Bean validation
  • Single sign-on with Keycloak
  • Role-based security
  • Optimistic locking with ETags
  • OWASP dependency check
  • Structured JSON Logging
  • Error handling
  • Integration tests with Cucumber
  • Architecture tests with ArchUnit
  • Local deployment with Docker
  • Reverse proxy with NGINX

Please install the following software before the workshop (if not already available):

  • Java 17+
  • Gradle 7.3+
  • Docker 19+
  • git
  • an IDE of your choice (like IntelliJ IDEA)

On Windows, we also highly recommend you install the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2+.

Target Audience: Software Architects, Software Engineers, Java Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in Java, Interest in software architecture
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Prerequisites:
This workshop is highly interactive. You will benefit greatly from trying it out for yourself as well.
Please install the following software before the workshop (if not already available):

  • Java 17+
  • Gradle 7.3+
  • Docker 19+
  • git
  • an IDE of your choice (like IntelliJ IDEA)

On Windows, we also highly recommend you install the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2+.

The example application "Chameleon" that will be used in this workshop has been designed as an educational example project for learning the basics of the Spring Boot ecosystem. But project "Chameleon" tries to be more than just a simple "hello world". It has all the needed parts in place to be as close to a "real world" production-ready software as possible.

Project "Chameleon" currently contains the following features:

General

  • Backend with Spring Boot
  • Yaml configuration file
  • Hexagonal architecture
  • Build with Gradle
  • Local deployment with Docker
  • Reverse proxy with NGINX

REST API

  • Definition of RestController with GET, POST, DELETE and PATCH
  • Description of REST API with OpenAPI
  • Swagger UI
  • Dtos
  • Model mapper
  • Bean validation
  • Global error handler
  • Local error handler
  • Request ids
  • Optimistic locking with ETags

Database

  • Storage in relational database with PostgreSQL
  • JPA, JpaRepository (Spring Data)
  • Database migration with Flyway

Security

  • Integration of SSO (single sign-on) with Keycloak
  • Role-based security (JSR250)
  • OWASP dependency check

Logging

  • JSON logging
  • Structured logging
  • Logging of request ids
  • Logging of user and roles

Testing

  • Unit tests with JUnit 5
  • Assertions with Google Truth
  • Architectural unit tests with ArchUnit
  • Coverage report of unit tests with JaCoCo
  • Integration tests with Cucumber

Dr. Christoph Ehlers is the Head of Software Engineering at ConSol. As a project lead, agile coach and software architect, he ensures the successful completion of IT projects. After studying computer science at the University of Passau, where he also earned his doctorate, Christoph Ehlers found his way to ConSol more than seven years ago. He is particularly interested in software architecture and databases. Caution: His enthusiasm for technology is contagious!

Christoph Ehlers
Christoph Ehlers
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10:00 - 13:00
Mo 8
Limitiert Balance in Testing
Balance in Testing

Today we must deal with shorter time-to-market, increasing complexity and more agility while keeping quality and other key system properties high.
To address these challenges the right balance in testing w.r.t. independence, timing, automation, and formality is critical but often not explicitly tackled.

Therefore, in this interactive tutorial we reflect on our current approach on balancing testing, investigate and discuss needed strategies, tactics, and practices, and share experiences to improve and sustain our testing approaches!

Max. number of participants: 40

Target Audience: Test Architects, Test Engineers, Product Owners, Quality Managers, Software Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge about testing and quality engineering
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Today we must deal with shorter time-to-market, increasing complexity and more agility while keeping quality and other key system properties high. Our test systems increase in size, volume, flexibility, velocity, complexity, and unpredictability. Additionally, digitalization requires more than just a face lift in testing.

To address these challenges the right balance in testing w.r.t. independence, timing, automation, and formality is critical but often not explicitly tackled. Therefore, in this interactive tutorial we reflect on our current approach on balancing testing, investigate and discuss needed strategies, tactics, and practices in different areas, and share experiences and lessons learned to improve and sustain our testing approaches!

The following areas in testing are covered w.r.t. their appropriate balancing:

  • Level of independence – independent vs. fully integrated with development
  • Timing – too early vs. too late
  • Degree of automation – automated vs. manual
  • Formality – formal vs. informal, scripted vs. exploratory
  • Test case design – structured vs. experience-based, black-box vs. white-box

Peter Zimmerer is a Principal Key Expert Engineer at Siemens AG, Technology, in Munich, Germany. For more than 30 years he has been working in the field of software testing and quality engineering. He performs consulting, coaching, and training on test management and test engineering practices in real-world projects and drives research and innovation in this area. As ISTQB® Certified Tester Full Advanced Level he is a member of the German Testing Board (GTB). Peter has authored several journal and conference contributions and is a frequent speaker at international conferences.

Peter Zimmerer
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 12
Limitiert Approval Testing: Get Legacy Code Under Control
Approval Testing: Get Legacy Code Under Control

Approval testing is a technique that helps you to get a difficult codebase under test and begin to control your technical debt. Approval testing works best on larger pieces of code where you want to test for multiple things and interpreting failures is challenging.

In this hands-on session we'll introduce a commonly-used Approval testing tool for Java and through hands-on exercises learn to get control of some example code. The same tool is also available for many other programming languages, see https://approvaltests.com/

Bring a laptop.
Max. number of participants: 30

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of Java and unit testing, bring a laptop
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:

Introducing Approval Testing (55 minutes)

  • Code Review: examine existing test case, discuss strengths & weaknesses
  • Demonstration: Convert an assertion-based test to use Approval testing
  • Hands-on exercise: Add some tests using Approvals.Java.

Break (5 minutes)

Approval Test Design (50 minutes)

  • Presentation: Approval testing characteristics and design patterns
  • Exercise: Using the default XML printer with Approvals.Java
  • Demonstration: Using scrubbing with an XML printer
  • Discussion: when to print, when to scrub

Printer Design (30 minutes)

  • Exercise: Designing a printer for a domain object
  • Presentation: Case studies
  • Q&A (10 minutes)

Emily Bache is a Technical Coach with ProAgile. She has worked with software development for over 20 years in diverse organizations from start-up to large enterprise. These days Emily specializes in coaching development teams in agile practices like Test-Driven Development, refactoring and agile design. Emily has written two books, authored Pluralsight courses and regularly speaks at software conferences. Originally from the UK, she currently lives in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Twitter: https://twitter.com/emilybache
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emilybache/
Github: https://github.com/emilybache
Website: https://sammancoaching.org/

Emily Bache
Emily Bache
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 14
Limitiert Seven Steps to Walking Your Why
Seven Steps to Walking Your Why

Join this tutorial to experiment with a self-reflection process, designed to bring balance into your own development journey.

Rooted in professional coaching practices from Co-Active Coaching, connected with several Liberating Structures, and inspired by ideas from Emotional Agility, this session will help you clarify your goals and aspirations as well as find the right balance for 2023.

Why do you do what you do? What’s important to you about it? What’s next?
Discover answers to these questions in this innovative and impactful tutorial.

Max. number of participants: 50

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Technical Leaders, Managers, Agile Coaches
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
When was the last time you had a chance to reflect on your career path, your goals and learning aspirations for the upcoming year?
This tutorial will be an opportunity to do this reflection in a very meaningful and innovative way. Rooted in professional coaching practices from Co-Active Coaching, connected with several Liberating Structures, inspired by ideas from Emotional Agility and Positive Intelligence, this session will help you clarify your goals and aspirations as well as find the right balance for 2023. Should you continue developing your technical mastery? Should you spend more time growing your leadership skills? What could you take on, if you were brave enough? How to find the time?

You will explore these and many other questions! Working individually and in small groups, we will start by clarifying your own core values. We will then explore what’s on your plate today, and what you are hoping to gain in 2023 with Ecocyce Planning Liberating Structure. We will explore in depth your Ecocycle traps: good ideas that you are not moving forward with as well as skills and practices that are no longer relevant for your self-actualisation.

Next, you will practice to apply your core values as a filter to activities and aspirations on your Ecocycle. You will seek patterns, and take a systemic view with W3 structure, gaining new insights and re-evaluating your Ecocycle. Next, in a silent brainstorming, you will come up with a list of actions you would (and would not) take in 2023, if you were 25 time bolder. Once again, you will apply your core values as a filter to find the most impactful actions on your list. We will wrap up the tutorial with 15% Solutions Liberating Structure, asking you to make a choice of the immediate next steps toward more impact and more balance on your development journey.

This session will take you deep into what really matters for you as a professional and as a human being. Learn from the case studies of applying this framework in individual coaching, team workshops and leadership coaching. Be prepared to be surprised by your own insights and Aha! Moments of other session participants.

Dana Pylayeva is an Agile Leadership coach, passionate about unleashing leadership potential in individuals and teams. International speaker and the author of “DevOps with Lego and Chocolate”, “Fear in the Workplace” and “Safety in the Workplace” agile games, Dana brings a powerful combo of multiple coaching styles (Co-Active, Positive Intelligence, Executive Coaching), facilitation with Liberating Structures, and a deep knowledge of Agile and DevOps.

Dana Pylayeva
Dana Pylayeva
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 15
Limitiert Accessibility Workshop to Help Capture Best Practises and Shift Left
Accessibility Workshop to Help Capture Best Practises and Shift Left

How often have you heard that “Yes this is important, but we don’t have the capacity right now” or “sure let’s put it in the backlog”?

At least 1 in 5 people in the UK have a long-term illness, impairment or disability. Many more have a temporary disability. A recent study found that 4 in 10 local council homepages failed basic tests for accessibility.
Bring a laptop.

Max. number of participants: 20

Target Audience: Everyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
How often have you heard that “Yes this is important, but we don’t have the capacity right now” or “sure let’s put it in the backlog”?
This is something we should not brush off or take lightly. Accessibility testing is vital especially when your product is a user facing application.
We need to be socially aware as a team and build quality towards our product with making it more accessible.

At least 1 in 5 people in the UK have a long-term illness, impairment or disability. Many more have a temporary disability. A recent study found that 4 in 10 local council homepages failed basic tests for accessibility.

This is quite vital and the sooner we as testers can advocate this into our teams, we make our product more accessible, reduce the risk of bad product reviews, reputation and also be more socially aware. Let's shift left and make accessibility testing built-in our teams.

  1. create a checklist
  2. look at some plugging (wave, lighthouse, arc toolkit, developer tools)
  3. Screen readers (mac/windows inbuilt)
  4. Have a healthy discussion on what they have learnt in the session and how can we bring accessibility sooner in an SDLC?
     

Laveena Ramchandani is an experienced Testing Consultant with a comprehensive understanding of tools available for software testing and analysis. She aims to provide valuable insights that have high technical aptitude and hopes to inspire others in the world through her work. Laveena holds a degree in Business Computing from Queen Mary University of London and regularly speaks at events on data science models and other topics.

Laveena Ramchandani
Laveena Ramchandani
Vortrag: Mo 15
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 1
Architecture as Knowledge
Architecture as Knowledge

It is common to consider software architecture as structure, as infrastructure, as code, as technologies, as models, and so on, but what if we consider software architecture as knowledge? The idea that software architecture is the set of significant decisions about a system is not a new one, but those decisions represent knowledge.

When we embrace the idea of knowledge as a first class concept, that has implications for our documentation (such as architecture decisions records), for our code and for our development process.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Managers, Coaches, Leaders
Prerequisites: No specific prerequisites
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
It is common to consider software architecture as structure, as infrastructure, as code, as technologies, as models, and so on, but what if we consider software architecture as knowledge? The idea that software architecture is the set of significant decisions about a system is not a new one, but those decisions represent knowledge.

When we embrace the idea of knowledge as a first class concept, that has implications for our documentation (such as architecture decisions records), for our code and for our development process.
This session will explore a number of concepts and practices that relate architecture to existing development practice and agile approaches. It will revisit patterns, explore ADRs, relate architecture to lean thinking, PDSA, hypothesis-driven development, and more.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His development interests are in programming, practice and people. He is co-author of two volumes in the ”Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture” series, and editor and contributor for multiple books in the ”97 Things” series. He lives in Bristol and online.

Kevlin Henney
Kevlin Henney
Vortrag: Nmo 1
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 4
Closing the Developer Experience Gap of your Container Platforms
Closing the Developer Experience Gap of your Container Platforms

Due to the lack of user focus, lots of container platforms have a big developer experience GAP.

That's not only because building a Kubernetes platform is complex but also because deploying applications on Kubernetes requires expertise in many Container and Kubernetes concepts.
Developers today shouldn’t have to care how their applications run and focus on adding business value.

In this session, we will explore some of the powerful open source technologies available within the Kubernetes ecosystem to close the developer experience gap.

Target Audience: Developers, DevSecOps
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in Kubernetes and software development
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Due to the lack of user focus, lots of container platforms have a big developer experience GAP.

That's not only because building a Kubernetes platform is complex but also because deploying applications on Kubernetes requires expertise in many Container and Kubernetes concepts. And once developers learn them, they still must spend a lot of time maintaining containers, writing YAML templates, and orchestrating many moving Kubernetes parts.

Like in the days when the Waterfall model was the standard for software development, developers today shouldn’t have to care where and how their applications run and focus on adding business value by implementing new features.

In this session, we will explore some of the powerful open source technologies available within the Kubernetes ecosystem to close the developer experience gap.

Timo Salm is based out of Stuttgart in southwest Germany and in the role of the first VMware Tanzu Solutions Engineer for Developer Experience in EMEA with a focus on VMware Tanzu Application Platform and commercial Spring products. In this role, he’s responsible for educating customers on the value, vision, and strategy of these products, and ensuring that they succeed by working closely on different levels of abstractions of modern applications and modern infrastructure.
Before Timo joined Pivotal and VMware, he worked for more than seven years for consulting firms in the automotive industry as a software architect and full-stack developer on projects for customer-facing products.

Timo Salm
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 5
Red Pills for the Leadership
Red Pills for the Leadership

The Middle Management, who has the required knowledge for successful Digital Transformations, is not appropriately engaged and won as change agents.

This interactive session walks the audience through seven steps of an implementation path. Each step is heavily interwoven with leadership challenges, skills, and practices. Most often, those are tacit.
The right path helps move from tacit transactional management to explicit transformational leadership, a prerequisite for successful Digital Transformations.

Target Audience: Manager, Decision Makers, Change Agents, Enterprise Transformation Implementers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of current digitization topics on management and frameworks
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Leadership is vital for successful Digital Transformations.
However, the leadership or managers, the "System Masters" of the "Frozen Middle Layer" having the required knowledge, are often not appropriately engaged and won as change agents. They continue to do what they successfully have done in the past —applying "tacit" personal knowledge and "managing," not "leading." Tacit knowledge was first defined by Michael Polanyi in the Tacit Dimension and later on used by Nonaka and Takeuchi in the SECI model.

Blindly applying highly standardized implementation roadmaps and so-called playbooks force leadership into orthodox paradigms and mental management models.
This interactive session walks the audience through seven steps of an implementation path — a good practice based on personal experience and linked to the theoretical foundation from various sources. It is about the early phase when the transformation initiatives are outlined. We stop at critical junctions and typical roadblocks. Each step is the foundation for further progress.

We look at a viable path through the roadmap of implementing Digital Transformation on the Enterprise level with an unleashed leadership team.
The path is not "train the teams and pray for help" but about winning the system masters as change agents right from the start.

After the introduction ( 5 / >0 / 5>), we stop at:

  • Red Pill or Blue Pill - the (pretended) commitment and wrong junction to Agile Theater or Cargo Cult ( 5 / >5 / 10>)
  • VUCA - we, the agile folks, know what we mean, but we altogether do not share a truly common language - the second disconnect ( 5 / >10 / 15>)
  • Perspectives, paradigms, again language, and culture ( 15 / >15 / 30>)
  • Leadership - away from transactional to transformational management for people, processes, managers, leaders, and teams ( 15 / >30 / 45>)
  • Leaders vs. managers as "System Masters" in the "Frozen Middle Layer" and their crucial contribution ( 5 / >45 / 50>)
  • "Knowledge and Know-How," tacit and explicit or what is it and how to unlock this for future success. The SECI model and Mindfulness as tools to tap hidden gems in ourselves and the organization ( 15 / >65 / 80>)
  • Postcard from the Future - how to fill the Backlogs of managers to unleash them as leaders ( 10 / >80 / 90>)

At every stop, there is an overview of what is so special about it

  • What we should avoid
  • What we should try
  • An interactive hybrid exchange and a game (not at every stop and depending on the votes of the audience)
  • deas on how to dig deeper into the rabbit hole - the gimmicks

This session links personal experience and anecdotes with the already available methods, practices, and theories. The "Red Pills for Leadership" session does not claim to introduce a new silver bullet. It is not another snake oil potion. It is a set of good practices that have been around for some decades, and many of us most probably at least partially already know. The audience will get a fully packed travel bag filled with the gimmicks and the takeaways from the interactive discussion at the various stops and junction points.

Depending on the personal experience level, the audience will get an idea for a potential good path or optimize their own path through the exchange with others on this leadership topic.
This is the way ;-)

Kurt Cotoaga started as a research assistant using evolutionary algorithms to solve np-hard problems. Those fascinating problems are still unsolved ...
His first pivot brought him into the product manager role for large online brokerage websites where he fooled himself and others into mixing up causality and correlation. It was a tough ride in the epicenter of the dot-com bubble burst ...
Having been perpetually torn apart between trying to create business value and pretending to be predictable, he pivoted around 2005 towards agility as a survival kit. From projects via programs to portfolios via products - this finally worked!
The last pivot beamed him into the consulting world, where he helps clients thrive in the digital age as a Business Value addicted Digitalization Evangelist or Enterprise Transformation Implementer.

Kurt Cotoaga
Kurt Cotoaga
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, (Dienstag, 07.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Di 3.1
Technical Coaching with the Samman Method
Technical Coaching with the Samman Method

For a technology company, building a strong engineering culture is essential for long-term success. Today's software industry is growing so fast that a large proportion of developers will inevitably have less than 5 years experience. At the same time, many software systems contain code that is ten, twenty or even thirty years old.

It's a constant challenge to communicate a healthy culture to newcomers and prevent technical debt from getting out of control. Technical coaching is all about tackling those issues: culture and skills.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
The Samman method is a concrete coaching method for spreading skills and culture within an engineering organization. There are two main parts to the method:
- Learning Hour
- Ensemble working

In the learning hour the coach uses exercises and active learning techniques to teach the theory and practice of skills like Test-Driven Development and Refactoring. In two-hour Ensemble sessions the whole team collaborates together with the coach in applying agile development techniques in their usual production codebase.

In combination with strong technical leadership, the Samman method can enable the spread of skills and culture to bring a healthy engineering organization to the next level.

Emily Bache is a Technical Coach with ProAgile. She has worked with software development for over 20 years in diverse organizations from start-up to large enterprise. These days Emily specializes in coaching development teams in agile practices like Test-Driven Development, refactoring and agile design. Emily has written two books, authored Pluralsight courses and regularly speaks at software conferences. Originally from the UK, she currently lives in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Twitter: https://twitter.com/emilybache
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emilybache/
Github: https://github.com/emilybache
Website: https://sammancoaching.org/

Micro-Learning-Cycles (MLCs) – Lernen ohne Zeit
Micro-Learning-Cycles (MLCs) – Lernen ohne Zeit

"Ich hatte keine Zeit, den Zaun zu flicken" - Dieses Zitat kennt wohl jeder, und doch ertappen wir uns selbst, unseren Zaun nicht geflickt, sondern stattdessen die Hühner gesucht zu haben.
Doch wie ändere ich das?
Dieser Vortrag zeigt mit dem Konzept der MLCs ein Tool auf, dieser Falle zu begegnen und sich selbst und andere in den Modus des kontinuierlichen Lernens zu versetzen.
Am Ende haben die Zuhörenden einen ersten MLC durchlaufen und ein Tool erlernt, um sich und anderen den Freiraum zum Lernen zu erschaffen.

Zielpublikum: Coaches, Entscheider, Projektleiter:innen, Transformation Manager, Architekt:innen, Lebenslange Lernende
Voraussetzungen: Keine
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Extended Abstract:
Micro-Learning-Cycles sind kein theoretisches Konstrukt, sie sind tatsächlich aus der Notwendigkeit entstanden, trotz vollem Terminkalender Zeit zum Lernen zu finden.
Neben der Vermittlung und Anwendung von MLC zeigt die Referentin auch aus der Praxis, wo sie MLCs einsetzte, was funktionierte und wo auch Limitierungen sind.

Ihr Motto „You go first! – Nimm dein Leben in die Hand!", steht für ihr Tun: Rein in den nachhaltigen Erfolg durch Eigenverantwortung und Selbstführung.
Anne Hoffmann unterstützt Menschen und Organisationen dabei, erfolgreich ihre Ziele zu erreichen. Als Expertin für Selbstführung und mit ihrem Motto „You go first!“ erinnert sie daran, dass nachhaltiger Erfolg durch hohe Eigenverantwortung insbesondere dann entsteht, wenn diese Selbstführung vorgelebt wird.
Anne benutzt oft Spiele, um Erkenntnisse weiterzugeben.

Emily Bache
Anne Hoffmann
Anne Hoffmann
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09:00 - 10:30
Di 5.1
Data, not Opinions: The Psychometrics of Team and Organisational Dynamics
Data, not Opinions: The Psychometrics of Team and Organisational Dynamics

"If you can't measure it, you can't improve it." Although it is (relatively) easy to measure objectively quantifiable decision criteria such as profit, how does one measure "soft" attributes, such as psychological safety or team dynamics, to judge an intervention's success?

This talk will present insights into the practical application of leading-edge research into what makes intelligent, high-performing teams and organisations, exploring the science behind the current buzzwords of psychological safety, diversity, and empathy.

Target Audience: Managers, Coaches, ScrumMasters
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
"If you can't measure it, you can't improve it." This quote, attributed to Peter Drucker, emphasises that the ability to measure something is essential for seeing changes in it. Although it is (relatively) easy to measure objectively quantifiable decision criteria such as profit, how does one measure "soft" attributes, such as psychological safety or team dynamics, to judge an intervention's success? The problem with most team/organisational assessments is that they say more about the persons who designed the evaluation (and what they want to sell) than about the persons taking it.

This talk will present insights into the practical application of leading-edge research into what makes intelligent, high-performing teams and organisations, exploring the science behind the current buzzwords of psychological safety, diversity, and empathy.

A quiet and reserved researcher and practitioner with over 25 years experience, Joseph Pelrine is considered by cognoscenti to be one of the pioneers and top experts on Agile methods. As a psychologist, his focus on people and his experience in applying leading-edge techniques from social complexity and psychology to process optimisation goes far beyond the domain of software development, and extends to the whole organisation.

Joseph Pelrine
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09:00 - 10:45
Di 8.1
How (Not) to Measure Quality
How (Not) to Measure Quality

Measuring quality requires many questions to be answered. The most obvious ones may be: “What is quality?”, but also “How can we measure it?”, “Which metrics are most accurate?”, “Which are most practical?”.

In this talk, I share some general motivations for measuring quality. I review commonly used metrics that claim to measure quality, I rate them with regards to how they may be helpful or harmful to achieve actual goals. I give some examples how the weaknesses of one metric might be countered by another one to create a beneficial system.

Target Audience: Developers, Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers, Quality Engineers, Testers, Product Owners
Prerequisites: Basic Software Project Experience, Rough Understanding of Software Development
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Measuring quality requires many questions to be answered. The most obvious ones may be: “What is quality?”, but also “How can we measure it?”, “Which metrics are most accurate?”, “Which are most practical?”.

In my experience, one question is often not answered or postponed until it is too late: “Why do we want to measure quality?” Is it because we want to control how well our developers are performing? Is it to detect problems early? Is it to measure the impact of changes? Is it the product or the process we care about? Is it to improve locally in a single team or globally across the company? Is there a specific problem that we are trying to solve, and if so, which one?

Instead of trying to define what software quality is – which is hard and depends on a lot of factors – we should first focus on the impact of our measuring. Some metrics may work great for one team, but not for the company as a whole. Some will help to reach your team or organizational goal, some will not help at all, and some will even have terrible side effects by setting unintended incentives. Some can be gamed, others might be harmful to motivation. Consider an overemphasis on lead time, which can lead to cutting corners. Or measuring the number of bugs found, which can cause a testers versus developers situation.

In this talk, I share some general motivations for measuring quality. I review various commonly used metrics that claim to measure quality. Based on my experience, I rate them with regards to how they may be helpful or harmful to achieve actual goals and which side effects are to be expected. I give some examples how the weaknesses of one metric might be countered by another one to create a beneficial system.

Michael Kutz has been working in professional software development for more than 10 years now. He loves to write working software, and he hates fixing bugs. Hence, he developed a strong focus on test automation, continuous delivery/deployment and agile principles.
Since 2014 he works at REWE digital as a software engineer and internal coach for QA and testing. As such his main objective is to support the development teams in QA and test automation to empower them to write awesome bug-free software fast.

The State and Future of UI Testing
The State and Future of UI Testing

UI testing is an essential part of software development. But the automation of UI tests is still considered too complex and flaky.
This talk will cover the "state of the art" of UI testing with an overview of tools and techniques. It will be shown which kind of representations are used by today's test tools and how the addressing of elements in the UI is done.
In addition, the role of artificial intelligence in the different approaches is shown and a prediction of testing tools of the future is presented.

Target Audience: Developers, Testers
Prerequisites: Basic Knowledge of UI-Testing
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
UI testing is an essential part of software development. Despite technological progress, the automation of UI tests is still considered too complex to function completely without manual intervention.
In addition to classical selector-based approaches, more and more image-based methods are being pursued.
This talk will cover the "state of the art" of UI testing with an overview of tools and techniques. In particular, current problems and future developments will be discussed. Furthermore, it will be shown which kind of UI representations are used by today's test tools and how the addressing of elements in the user interface is done.
In addition, the role of artificial intelligence in the different approaches is shown and a prediction of testing tools of the future is presented on the basis of current research.

Johannes Dienst is Developer Advocate at askui. His focus is on automation, documentation, and software quality.

Michael Kutz
Johannes Dienst
Johannes Dienst
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 2.2
How to Deal with Toxic People
How to Deal with Toxic People

When we talk about leadership and balance, we also need to talk about how we handle toxic behaviour in our midst and how we protect ourselves and our communities from it. As a full-time open source maintainer and project leader, I've sadly had to encounter many ungrateful, entitled or outright toxic people.

In this session I'll first show some examples, then share some coping strategies that I've successfully used to deal with them. I'll also share some things that everyone can do to help with responding to negativity.

Target Audience: Developers, Project Leaders, Open Source Users
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
It's no secret that running an open source project has its dark sides, and one of these is having to sometimes interact with quite ungrateful, entitled or outright toxic people. As a project's popularity increases, so does the frequency of this kind of interaction, adding to the burden shouldered by maintainers and possibly becoming a significant risk factor for maintainer burnout.

I've been the project leader and maintainer of a quite popular project for almost ten years straight now, and had to develop the one or other coping strategy to deal with these interactions, in order to not let them drag me down and negatively affect my motivation and mental health. In this talk I want to first give a classification of the most common forms of bad and toxic behaviour I've seen, and then share my personal approach to dealing with them, explaining why this has worked for me along the line.

In the end, the viewer should take away some concrete advice on how to handle possibly volatile interpersonal situations in the context of an open source project and beyond without compromising on their own mental well-being.

Gina Häußge is a passionate code monkey, gamer, hobby baker, and creator and maintainer of OctoPrint. She has always been in love with code, and loves tinkering and helping others. Gina has written open source software for most of her adult life and has been in the lucky position to do it full time — and 100% crowdfunded by the community for her project OctoPrint for several years now. During this time, she has learned a lot about leading open source projects and managing communities.

Gina Häußge
Gina Häußge
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 3.2
Zero Trust for APIs: Patterns and Practices
Zero Trust for APIs: Patterns and Practices

Zero Trust Architecture has become the norm for how to modernize IT security in an age of growing network complexity and fewer ways to define hard network boundaries. Today, APIs are a standard way of how organizations expose both technical and business capabilities. But what does it mean for an API to be "Zero Trust Ready"?

In this presentation we look at some of the general patterns that APIs need to follow for Zero Trust readiness. We also look at some concrete practices for how to follow those patterns in your own APIs and API landscape.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, API Designers, API Program/Platform Managers, Security Leads
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of API terminology
Level: Advanced

Erik Wilde works in the Catalyst team at Axway. The team's mission is to help customers do the right things in the API and digital transformation space. Erik has been working in a variety of software companies, always focusing on questions of architecture and strategy. Erik's background is in computer science and he holds a Ph.D. from ETH Zurich, but over the course of his career it has become increasingly clear to him that technology rarely is the factor holding back organizations. So now he is helping organizations with their strategy to make sure that they are successful on their journeys.

Erik Wilde
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 7.2
Carving Microservices Out of the Monolith
Carving Microservices Out of the Monolith

For a microservices architecture to be successful it is crucial to have the right boundaries between the microservices. But where are the right boundaries? We would like to present a tool that helps us answer this question.

Domain Storytelling is a collaborative modeling method. It brings together domain experts and development teams. We let our users tell us stories about their work. While listening, we record the stories using a pictographic language.

In this talk we show how to find subdomains and which heuristics can help us.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Project experience
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
For a microservices architecture to be successful it is crucial to have the right boundaries between the microservices. But where are the right boundaries? We would like to present a tool that helps us answer this question.

Domain Storytelling is a collaborative modeling method. It brings together domain experts and development teams. We let our users tell us stories about their work. While listening, we record the stories using a pictographic language.

The experts can immediately see if we understand their story. After very few stories, we understand the language of our users and find different areas of the domain. Each of these areas (called a subdomain) is a good candidate to become a microservice in our architecture.

In this talk we show how to find subdomains and which heuristics can help us.

Henning Schwentner loves programming in high quality. He lives this passion as coder, coach, and consultant at WPS – Workplace Solutions in Hamburg, Germany. There he helps teams to structure their monoliths or to build new systems from the beginning with a sustainable architecture. Microservices or self-contained systems are often the result. Henning is author of “Domain Storytelling – A Collaborative Modeling Method” and the www.LeasingNinja.io as well as translator of “Domain-Driven Design kompakt”.

Henning Schwentner
Henning Schwentner
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 8.2
Testing AI Systems
Testing AI Systems

At first glance, testing AI systems seems very different from testing “conventional” systems. However, many standard testing activities can be preserved as they are or only need small extensions.

In this talk, we give an overview of topics that will help you test AI systems: Attributes of training/testing/validation data, model performance metrics, and the statistical nature of AI systems. We will then relate these to testing tasks and show you how to integrate them.

Target Audience: Developers, Testers, Architects
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of testing
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
From a testing perspective, systems that include AI components seem like a nightmare at first glance. How can you test a system that contains enough math to fill several textbooks and changes its behavior on the whims of its input data? How can you test what even its creators don’t fully understand?

Keep calm, grab a towel and carry on - what you have already been doing is still applicable, and most of the new things you should know are not as arcane as they might seem. Granted, some dimensions of AI systems like bias or explainability will likely not be able to be tested for in all cases. However, this complexity has been around for decades even in systems without any AI whatsoever. Additionally, you will have allies: Data scientists love talking about testing data.

In this talk, we give an overview of topics that will help you test AI systems: Attributes of training/testing/validation data, model performance metrics, and the statistical nature of AI systems. We will then relate these to testing tasks and show you how to integrate them.

Gregor Endler holds a doctor's degree in Computer Science for his thesis on completeness estimation of timestamped data. His work at Codemanufaktur GmbH deals with Machine Learning and Data Analysis.

Marco Achtziger is a Test Architect working for Siemens Healthcare GmbH in Forchheim. He has several qualifications from iSTQB and iSQI and is a certified Software Architect by Siemens AG.

Gregor Endler, Marco Achtziger
Gregor Endler, Marco Achtziger
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 1.3
The Best Architecture is Late Architecture
The Best Architecture is Late Architecture

Many approaches to software architecture assume that architecture be planned at the beginning from the project's quality goals. This is problematic as the macroarchitecture is hard to change, and the quality goals it's based on tend to be unknown at the beginning of a project, or change later. Consequently, it would really be preferable if we could defer the macroarchitectural decisions until later.

This talk shows how to do this using systematic modelling and functional programming.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: Basic architecture knowledge
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
What should we do first then? We should write down what we know, at the time we know it, and do it in such a way that we generate reusable components that can be assembled into any macroarchitecture.

Concretely, this can be done by using staple techniques from functional programming:
•    building small, flexible combinators instead of fixed attribute-structure OO models
•    decoupling pervasively using abstraction
•    using immutability to avoid hidden dependencies

The talk shows how to do this, and report on our experience in several concrete projects.

Michael Sperber is CEO of Active Group in Tübingen, Germany. Mike specializes in functional programming and has been an internationally recognized expert in the field: He has spoken at the top conferences in programming languages, authored many papers on the subject as well as several books. Moreover, he is an expert on teaching programming.

Michael Sperber
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 4.3
The Big Move – a Cloud Modernisation Experience
The Big Move – a Cloud Modernisation Experience

Re-purchasing an application is seen as the top of craftsmanship for cloud migrations. But people have rarely seen such a project in practice. This is the courageous journey of a real consumer product running on expensive infrastructure for years with 2 million active users and more than 6PB of data.

The talk takes you on a journey to a German public cloud and shares all the learnings - about shifting massive data, about terraforming infrastructures, about customizing open source and about all it takes to launch and stay in business.

Target Audience: IT people with no fear of few technical details
Prerequisites: Curiosity about a real public cloud modernisation approach
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The journey will have the following stages:

Stage 1: How architecture for such a quest looks like and how to start?
Three architecture goals will drive the rest of the journey:
- Efficient scaling
- Minimal run efforts
- Release robust customisation

Stage 2: Customisation of an Open Source product

Stage 3: Migration - decisions and actual experiences during migration

Stage 4: Rollout and staying alive

Bernd Rederlechner ist einer der Principal Lead Architects von T-Systems mit Schwerpunkt "Digitale Lösungen". Er war verantwortlich für die Lieferung von kleinen Innovationsprojekten, aber auch von wirklich großen Landschaftsvorhaben, wo er immer eine Balance zwischen Product Owner, Dev, Ops, Test und Security finden musste. Heute liegt seine Passion im Aufbau von Teams, die digitale Ideen zur Reality machen können - für Kunden und für die Deutschen Telekom.

Bernd Rederlechner
Bernd Rederlechner
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 5.3
Trauma-informed Agile – How I Adapted my Practice to Latest Knowledge in Psychology
Trauma-informed Agile – How I Adapted my Practice to Latest Knowledge in Psychology

In recent decades, our scientific and clinical understanding of how our nervous system works has increased tremendously. I’ve recently completed an education for trauma-informed work (NARM informed professional). It has changed many key aspects of how I teach and coach and will continue to have a large impact.

In this session, I’m presenting those key learnings, connecting them to well-known parts of Agile knowledge and inviting into a discussion of what a more trauma-informed approach to leading people in Agile organisations could look like.

Target Audience: All kinds of Leaders, Product Owners, People Managers, Decision Makers, Coaches, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: No prerequisites
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
In recent decades, our scientific and clinical understanding of how our nervous system develops and works has increased tremendously. Its implications are so profound, they radiate far beyond the field of psychology. Topics such as trauma-informed law, trauma-informed volleyball coaching, legal counseling, education, social activism have arisen. It is time to think about how it affects leadership.

Your speaker Anton, a Scrum trainer and coach, has recently completed a NARM-informed professional education. It has tremendously changed some key aspects of how he leads, teaches and coaches and will surely continue to have a large impact. In this session, he is presenting those key learning, connects them to well-known parts of Agile knowledge and invites into a discussion of what a more trauma-informed approach to leadership could look like.

In this talk you will:
•    experience a more calmer vulnerable space
•    learn what developmental trauma is and how it plays out in the workplace
•    learn about regulation and states of our nervous systems and its connection to creativity and cognitive capacity
•    get a new angle to think and act about topics such as responsibility, clarification of assignments and setting goals, teaching, mentoring and more
•    reflect on how these topics affects your own line of work and exchange on ideas

Anton Skornyakov is an Agile Coach and CST® for Scrum Alliance®, an experienced speaker and facilitator at many conferences, user groups for topics around Agile, facilitation, non-violent communication and leadership. Largest spaces were GSG Munic 2016, GSG Vienna 2019, OOP Munic 2019. However, there were many more at local conferences, user groups and meetups.
Most relevant to the topic Anton is speaking about, is his recently finished education as a NARM®-informed professional with the NARM® Training Institute. NeuroAffective Relational Model® (NARM®) is a unique and powerful approach to developmental trauma.

Anton Skornyakov
Anton Skornyakov
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 9.3
If it is About Cloud Native Transformation ... It Is Still About People! (Experience Report)
If it is About Cloud Native Transformation ... It Is Still About People! (Experience Report)

I will share our hands-on experience with a cloud native (container) transformation that is currently unfolding. Technically, implementing an Open Shift Container Platform (bare metal) is pretty challenging. Doing this in a way that we will have pretty stuff in our data centers and at the same time making sure that our technical possibilities are actually being used effectively by product developers ... is a different challenge all together.

Join this session if you'd like to hear what we figured out about the people side of this kind of change!

Target Audience: Architects, Management, Developers, Operational Heroes, Product Owners, Agile Coaches, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of DevOps concepts
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
In this session I will share our hands-on experiences implementing a container-based architecture in our organisation. Choosing to implement Open Shift (bare metal) as your container platform is pretty difficult and challenging technically. It is also rather exciting and not too difficult to find smart people willing to help you build and run this new platform. However, it turns out that there is far more to this challenge than just the technology. Therefore, we are adopting an evolutionary implementation approach - stringing together small experiments - towards a flexible, more experimental and proactive culture that will allow us to actually benefit from the technical possibilities our new platform offers. This session is our story of our evolutionary and experimental approach and what we discovered along the way that works in this kind of transformation. Our main "discovery" is that even though at first it seemed mostly a technical transformation, it actually is far more of a human challenge.

We are right in the middle of this transformation so in this talk, I will bring you the latest and most valuable insights and experiences regarding this organisational and cultural transformation that is needed to turn the potential of our container platform into actual value for our organisation. We will summarise our ideas in a practical "this might work" list (bear in mind however there are no best practices, just patterns that might work in your specific situation).

An example of an experiment that turned out useful in our situation is: "create a small separate team that will drive this change". In our organisation we strive to build end-to-end teams, so at first we tried to get this new platform started from within the regular Infra DevOps team (as a huge Epic on the backlog). But people however got swamped in work and annoyed by all the context switching this required. Team members got tired and frustrated with the huge amounts of work, sky high ambitions and lack of progress. So, in the end we did a small experiment by creating a separate, dedicated, core team to get things going. This experiment turned out to be successful (and was thus extended) because it allowed team members to focus on the development of the platform and to build, document and share their experiences along the way, so that this team is also able to incrementally onboard the other teams along the way. Busy OPS-teams and product teams can't just develop the new platform on the side, next to all their other ongoing work. Building a container platform is epic and needs dedicated time and focus, also to keep people in their best energy.

I will share some of our most useful experiments and experiences, all having to do with the human side of this container transformation.

This session is not meant for decision making on going cloud native or not. If you do go cloud native, please bear in mind it is still about people, most of all!

Maryse Meinen is a product leader, currently working in a product owner role, building a full-blown container platform for a new IT infrastructure, together with an awesome team. She is also an active practitioner of Stoic philosophy, trying to live according to values like "humans are made for cooperation", "wisdom" and "perseverance". Always keeping an eye on the human aspect of our work, she strives to humanise our workplace a bit more every day.

Maryse Meinen
17:45 - 18:45
Di 5.4
The Passions of Programming
The Passions of Programming

"We're looking for passionate programmers!" says the job ad. Passion is used to evoke single-mindedness, drive and intensity. There is more than one kind of passion, and when raw passion is tempered with compassion and dispassion, we start to see a more balanced way of development.

Good development draws on both creativity and rationality, on both experience and experimentation, on both focus and connection, on both individual skill and group intelligence. Let's explore the many passions of programming.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Managers, Coaches, Leaders
Prerequisites: No specific prerequisites
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
"We're looking for passionate programmers!" says the job ad. For a love-in or a development role? Passion is used to evoke single-mindedness, drive and intensity, but it also has many other meanings, surely not all of which can be intended. Love aside, passion also spills over into irrationality, aggression — e.g., crimes of passion — and unconditional and unquestioning pursuit of ideas. Our acceptance of this word and this quality should be partial and conditional. But there is more than one kind of passion, and when raw passion is tempered with compassion and dispassion, we start to see a more balanced way of development.

Good development draws on both creativity and rationality, on both experience and experimentation, on both focus and connection, on both individual skill and group intelligence. The dry language of productivity needs to admit the possibility of enjoyment; the culture of burn-out needs to give way to humanity and empathy. Let's explore the many passions of programming.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His development interests are in programming, practice and people. He is co-author of two volumes in the ”Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture” series, and editor and contributor for multiple books in the ”97 Things” series. He lives in Bristol and online.

Kevlin Henney
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17:45 - 18:45
Di 8.4
The Shape of Testing, Teams and the World in the Future
The Shape of Testing, Teams and the World in the Future

IT is always changing ... In this talk I'll do some crystal ball gazing from two perspectives. At heart, I’m a tester. For two years I’ve also been a CEO. I’ll look at what factors are at work and what kinds of effects will they have on how we work and the roles of testers and software professionals.

Alongside musings about the future, I’ll talk about concrete activities on an individual and company level to best prepare ourselves for this nebulous future.

Target Audience: Everyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
I’m not the first person to notice that the world is constantly changing and that everything is impermanent. Most especially after the last two years, we have really been forced to come to terms with how quickly and drastically things can change. As IT professionals, we are aware of the intrinsic changeability of projects, contexts and our business, but the events of the last couple of years have put this into sharper focus.

But let’s not get too generally philosophical about the whole world. Let’s look at what is in our more immediate context and perhaps even in our sphere of influence. If our future is anything, it’s nebulous (and I don’t just mean the cloud). How will external changes shape our teams and our work, and how can we shape ourselves proactively in order to be able to respond to changes, make changes or our own and even thrive?

In this talk I’d like to do some triangulated crystal ball gazing from two perspectives. At heart, I’m a tester. For two years I’ve also been a CEO. From my passion for testing and my experience of business and people in organisations, I’ll look at what factors are at work now, what known unknowns we have and what kinds of effects will they have on how we work and the roles of testers and software professionals.
Alongside musings about the future, I’ll talk about concrete activities on an individual and company level to best prepare ourselves for this nebulous future.

Alex Schladebeck ist ein Wirbelwind aus Begeisterung für Qualität, Agilität und Menschen. Aus der anfänglichen Testerrolle ist eine spannende Karriere als Product Owner, Berater und Führungskraft entstanden, bevor sie 2020 Teil der Geschäftsführung bei der Bredex GmbH wurde.
Sie verbringt ihre Zeit in Kommunikation mit verschiedenen Menschen. Dazu gehört Wissensvermittlung durch Workshops und Coaching, Zusammenarbeit mit Entwicklern und Testern, Kundenberatung, Mitarbeiterentwicklung sowie strategische Themen mit anderen Führungskräften umzusetzen. Sie hält sich bei ihrem Lieblingsthemen auf dem Laufenden, indem sie weiterhin Kunden und Teams berät und unterstützt.
Alex spricht häufig auf Konferenzen als Speaker oder Keynote-Speaker über Agilität, Qualitätssicherung und Führung aus Sicht ihrer Erfahrung. In ihrer Freizeit ist sie leidenschaftliche Sportlerin, Musikerin und Tante. Sie beschreibt sich selbst als „explorer“ und liebt es, Orte, Kulturen, Perspektiven und Menschen zu entdecken.

Alex Schladebeck
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, (Mittwoch, 08.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Mi 3.1
Beyond Taming Technical Debt
Beyond Taming Technical Debt

Discipline, determination, a highly visible area, and a few sticky notes, are all you need to move beyond problems with technical debt.

Target Audience: Developers, Project Leader, Designers, Product Owners, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Basic Knowledge of Software Development Process
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
## Making great software is challenging
It doesn't matter how qualified a team is, it will never be able to produce perfect, flawless, entirely bug-free software.
While teams are discovering how to build the right software in the right way, the environment the team operates in changes.
This results in a constant reorientation of the product, and the corresponding software solution, which will cause gaps between how things work, and how they should work.
Unfortunately, the market won't wait infinitely until teams have addressed these issues in the software, and organizations tend to run out of patience too.
That is why teams often have to move forward with designs and code that are ... let's call them sub-optimal.
These gaps, they are technical debt: a loan against the future, where things will be fixed, at some point ... Hopefully.
According to a global survey performed by Stripe, Inc. amongst software engineers in 2018, researchers found that **engineers estimate to spend 17,3 hours per week on addressing technical debt**.
That same research established that developers work about 41.1 hours per week. With that in mind, addressing technical debt constitutes well over a third of the time a typical engineer spends per week.
**If engineers are spending that much time, how could they better utilize their attention?**
Why do they seem unable to gain control over this metric and push it downwards?
While technical debt sounds nice and predictable: "you just have to pay interest", it really is like a loan with a mobster, and not with a bank.
It will show up unannounced at your doorstep at 3.30 in the morning, demanding that you pay up now!
How can you prevent being surprised by this goon?! And what can you do to leverage the benefits of borrowing against the future?
Because when the conditions are right, taking out a loan and paying it back Tomorrow might just help you ship a better product today.

## Imagine...
- A lightweight process to discover technical debt without a big investment up front
- A data-driven approach to identify the technical debt that needs attention right now
- A system that is easy to introduce, and simple to enforce
- Something that will guide engineers to articulate technical debt in terms of our roadmap
- Which will ultimately improve the flow of work in your organization

## The Wall of Technical Debt™️
A few years ago [Mathias Verraes coined the term "_The Wall of Technical Debt_"][1]. During this presentation Marijn Huizendveld will show you how to institute such a process for managed technical debt. Doing so will provide you with a safety net that allows you to make "naive" design choices every now and again to ship your ideas as fast as possible, without sacrificing sustainable delivery in the long run.
[1]: verraes.net/2020/01/wall-of-technical-debt/

Marijn Huizendveld – In a small backstreet of Tokyo lives a man named Aki, a 78 years old former chef. Aki spent most of his life trying to perfectly cook the rice he buys from his friend Mato. He's been at it for 57 years now, and still searches for ways to improve his cooking methods. There is probably not too much anybody else could tell Aki about cooking this specific type of rice. When it comes to his process, Aki's understanding is unrivaled.
After years of trial and error, Marijn Huizendveld could be called the Aki of Domain-Driven Design, due to his extensive background in both programming and strategy. He uses this experience to show teams and organizations how to recognize and act on problems and opportunities in an autonomous, self-learning fashion.

Maintenance and Evolution of Large Scale Software Systems – Business, Dev & Ops Challenges
Maintenance and Evolution of Large Scale Software Systems – Business, Dev & Ops Challenges

Even in the time of agile software development and devOps, maintenance and evolution of large-scale software systems remain challenging. This is not only caused by technical debt, but is heavily caused by lost knowledge, high complexity of micro-service architectures, difficult requirements management, not available documentation, and the complexity of communication among and coordination of the many stakeholders. In our session we will talk about the challenges we identified in our study and present new approaches to address these challenges.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Project Management Experience, Software Maintenance
Level: Expert

Martin Kropp is professor for Software Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland. His interest is in everything that makes software development more efficient, build automation, testing, refactoring and development methodologies.

As a software engineer, Janick Rüegger worked in different teams from web development to platform engineering. In his master’s degree, he focuses on the challenges of large-scale software development.

Marijn Huizendveld
Martin Kropp, Janick Rüegger, Andreas Meier
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 5.1
Code Wars: Bringing Balance to the Design Force
Code Wars: Bringing Balance to the Design Force

How much design is enough design? How much is overdesign? When does — or should — design happen? How big is 'design'?
Anyone who has ever looked at the methodology landscape or has juggled different roles in software development — programmer, architect, coach, therapist, code paramedic, politician — knows that there are many answers to these questions, and they often contradict one another.

In this talk, we will consider different scales and time frames of design in software, bringing some balance to competing perspectives and recommendations

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Tech Leads, Project Leads
Prerequisites: Interest in software architecture and design
Level: Advanced

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His development interests are in programming, practice and people. He is co-author of two volumes in the ”Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture” series, and editor and contributor for multiple books in the ”97 Things” series. He lives in Bristol and online.

Frank Buschmann ist Senior Principal Engineer bei Siemens Corporate Technology in München. Dort erforscht er moderne Software-Architektur und Entwicklungsansätze für die industrielle Digitalisierung. Die Produktentwicklung unterstützt Frank bei der effizienten Anwendung dieser Technologien. Seine aktuellen Forschungsschwerpunkte sind Architekturen für Cyber-Physikalische Systeme, das Internet of Things, Intelligente Systeme sowie industrielles DevOps. Frank ist Co-Autor von vier Bänden der von John Wiley & Sons veröffentlichten 'Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture'.
A Commune in the Ivory Tower? – A New Approach to Architecture
A Commune in the Ivory Tower? – A New Approach to Architecture

Traditional (i.e. hands-off, blessed-few) approaches to architecture rarely (if ever) work. But in the world of microservices, autonomous teams, and continuous delivery, architecture is more important than ever. Is there an alternative?

Target Audience: Architecture Practitioners (Architects, Lead Developers, etc.)
Prerequisites: Experience delivering software architecture
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
I’m an architect, and I think a lot about architecture. Mostly I think about how irrelevant architecture is if it doesn’t get shipped to production. I worry a lot too. I worry about how to help all the teams I’m supposed to be helping, without slowing them down, getting in their way, or making their lives harder rather than easier.

This paper introduces a mindset and an associated set of practices which do away with the traditional idea of “Architects” while bringing the practice of “Architecture” to the fore. I’ll explain how I and colleagues have used this approach at multiple clients to help everyone become an architect, without things reducing to chaos (though there is a healthy dose of anarchy).

A highly enthusiastic, self-starting and responsible Tech Principal; Andrew Harmel-Law specialises in Java / JVM technologies, agile delivery, build tools and automation, and domain-driven design.
Experienced across the software development lifecycle and in many sectors including government, banking, and eCommerce, what motivates him is the production of large-scale software solutions, fulfilling complex client requirements. He understands that people, tooling, architecture and process all have key roles to play in achieving this.
Andrew has a passion for open-source software and its communities. He has been interested in and involved with OSS to a greater or lesser extent since his career began, as a user, contributor, expert group member, or paid advocate.
Finally, Andrew enjoys sharing his experience as much as possible. This sharing is not only seen in his formal consulting engagements, but also informally through mentoring, blog posts, conferences (speaking and organising), and open sourcing his code.

Kevlin Henney, Frank Buschmann
Andrew Harmel-Law
Kevlin Henney, Frank Buschmann

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Andrew Harmel-Law
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 6.1
Kleiner Wanderführer für IT-Systeme
Kleiner Wanderführer für IT-Systeme

Firmen können kaum noch IT-Systeme neu entwickeln, ohne dass existierende Funktionalität mitwandert. Vor die Aufgabe gestellt, ein System von einem Fremdanbieter in eine Public Cloud zu überführen, hat sich gezeigt, dass hilfreiche Wanderführer rar sind.
Diese Session strukturiert Entscheidungswege und Erkenntnisse bei Cloud-basierten Migrationsvorhaben - abgeleitet aus der Migration und Modernisierung von einem Konsumenten-Service mit 6 PB Daten und ca. 2 Mio. Nutzern.

Zielpublikum: Business-Architekt:innen, Entwickler:innen, Projektleiter:innen, Manager, Entscheider
Voraussetzungen: Erfahrung mit IT-Projekten
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Extended Abstract:
Wanderungen versprechen Entspannung, Panorama oder Sehenswürdigkeiten auf dem Weg. Selten steht bei der Planung die erwartete Anstrengung im Vordergrund. Ähnlich ist es mit Cloud-Migrationen: Der positive Beitrag zur geschäftlichen Entwicklung lockt, aber nicht ohne Mühe.

Wir streifen die folgenden Etappen:
1. Tourenplanung: Wie wähle ich den richtigen Migrationsweg, aka. die "Migrationsstrategie"
2. Lohnt sich der Weg: Wie überzeuge ich Entscheider, ein solches Vorhaben zu sponsoren
3. Auf dem Weg bleiben: Wie managt man den Migrationsfortschritt?
4. Bleibende Erinnerungen: Wie begegnet man übergroßen Erwartungen und vermeidet Enttäuschung bei Endkunden und Produktverantwortlichen?

Bernd Rederlechner ist einer der Principal Lead Architects von T-Systems mit Schwerpunkt "Digitale Lösungen". Er war verantwortlich für die Lieferung von kleinen Innovationsprojekten, aber auch von wirklich großen Landschaftsvorhaben, wo er immer eine Balance zwischen Product Owner, Dev, Ops, Test und Security finden musste. Heute liegt seine Passion im Aufbau von Teams, die digitale Ideen zur Reality machen können - für Kunden und für die Deutschen Telekom.

Balancing Legacy and Innovation: Taking your IBM Mainframe on the Modernization Journey
Balancing Legacy and Innovation: Taking your IBM Mainframe on the Modernization Journey

Modernization projects are not a straight line as there’s no one-stop shop. Balance is definitely the right word: we talk here about finding the proper trade-off between quality/costs/timeframe requirements and customized patterns for a successful legacy system modernization. Based on actual use cases, we’ll discuss the available solutions (ERP implementation, code rewriting, middleware, cloud…), and see why combining the relevant tools is key.
Let us take you on a modernization journey and get your IBM mainframe to embrace innovation!

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leaders, Chief Information Officers
Prerequisites: IBM i (AS400) and IBM z environments, mainframes, software development
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Trusted by major players in the insurance, banking, industrial and public services, IBM i and IBM z mainframes are undoubtedly powerful and reliable. Yet, the core business applications developed decades ago are no longer suited for today's requirements nor for tomorrow's innovations. Issues are piling up: maintenance, regulations, cybersecurity, mobility, UX/UI, technical debt … all made worse by the lack of skilled and motivated developers able to untangle layers of spaghetti legacy COBOL or RPG codes.

When the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) is rising, some may consider simply shifting to modern architectures. Remember the massive rush to a famous ERP in the 2000s? Disarray, downtime, sleepless nights dreading data loss … History has taught us that forced march towards efficiency is possible but also that balance to consider the actual business environment and needs could have been a far better solution, both for systems and people.
Successful modernization is about making the most of the existing mainframe (remember, IBM i and IBM z systems are powerful and reliable!), adapting it to the latest IT trends and strategically relocating applications, inside or outside the mainframe.

Let us introduce you to an interesting use case we had a few years ago: this financial institution, specialized in consumer loans, is struggling with the obsolescence of its mainframe core business applications:
•    Accounting
•    Human resources and payroll
•    Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
•    Documentary reporting

Lately, legacy applications had had issues to address new demands from their various users (accountants, HR, sales, management):
•    How to work over 2 accounting exercises?
•    How to add new data and issue monthly statements of account?
•    How to call an external webservice to check customer solvency?
•    How to cope with the stricter compliance checks requested by financial regulations?
•    How to secure remote access for other branches?
•    How to provide a modern, secure and multi-session interface?
•    How to offer mobile access to all kinds of devices?

We’ll discuss a fully customized and easy to implement solution to modernize:
developers’ workstations: Java Integrated Development Environment (IDE)
systems and software: migration, decommissioning, revamping, middleware, runtime, mobile connectivity, web services, cloud
Let’s dive together into this real-world use case and deploy the full array of modernization tools to support this financial institution in her quest for innovation.

Firas Al-Shawi is passionate about software modernization and always has the focus to keep softwares future-proof. He is Senior Consultant and Productmanager working for EasiRun Europa GmbH.

Julie Dumortier is a lifelong entrepreneur with a passion to ‘Simply solve complex problems'. She is President of Metrixware Systemobjects, the French ISV specialized in mainframe modernization.

Bernd Rederlechner
Firas Al-Shawi, Julie Dumortier
Firas Al-Shawi, Julie Dumortier
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 7.1
The Sustainability Mythbuster
The Sustainability Mythbuster

There are many discussions, slogans, and myths out there when it comes to sustainability. But what is behind all those slogans? What does “carbon neutral” really mean and how does it compare to “net-zero”? Is my cloud really running on renewable energy? What are the low-hanging fruits when it comes to reducing carbon emissions? And how does “carbon offsetting” really work?

This session explains all those slogans and concepts, sheds some light at common myths, and provides the audience with a solid understanding of the topic.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Managers, Project Leaders
Prerequisites: No prerequisites
Level: Basic

Martin Lippert is Spring Tools Lead and Sustainability Ambassador @ VMware.

Applying Green Software in the Real World
Applying Green Software in the Real World

The topic of Green Software is very important because software is everywhere and affects the environment indirectly through the usage of hardware. Jochen Joswig explains what Green Software means and more detailed how energy demand can rise through software usage. There are different degrees of software effects on the environment that can be considered and evaluated. Jochen Joswig is furthermore researching green software metrics, approaches, quality criteria and how they can be applied in the daily business of software development.

Target Audience: Software Engineers, IT-Architects, IT-Consultants, Manager, ESG-Consultants, Sustainability Manager
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Information and communication technology (ICT) is both a curse and a blessing when looking for solutions to environmental problems like the climate crisis. On the one hand, things like video calls and instant messaging reduce the need for travel and thereby reduce greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, the total energy consumption and natural resource demand of ICT is growing. Therefore, in his opinion it is the responsibility of everyone involved in software development to use these resources as sparingly and efficiently as possible. Ideally during all parts of a software’s lifecycle.

There has been extensive research in recent years about Green Software. In this talk, Jochen Joswig will introduce some of the key ideas and methods from his research and make the matter of Green Software more accessible. Furthermore, he will introduce some areas in which in his opinion research is still lacking and provide a personal view on how this could be changed.

Jochen Joswig studied Computer Science at the Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena (B.Sc.) and Universität Hamburg (M.Sc.). Since then, he has been especially interested in developing ESG and CSR software. He sees great potential in the cloud, when creating software solutions that provide added value, are satisfying to use and are eco-friendly, all at the same time. Jochen Joswig works as software engineer at MaibornWolff and is doing research in Green Information and communication technology (ICT).

Martin Lippert
Jochen Joswig
Jochen Joswig
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09:00 - 10:30
Mi 9.1
Scenario Casting – Agility Starts in DDD's Problem Space!
Scenario Casting – Agility Starts in DDD's Problem Space!

This talk explains how Scenario Casting enables agile teams to pull together despite diverse ideas and concerns - in three iterative collaborative steps:
1. Find example scenarios of how ideas and concerns affect the domain - strictly in domain language! This provides an initial Scenario Backlog outlining the problem space.
2. Prioritize the Scenario Backlog and agree on scope.
3. Combine the top scenarios into coherent overarching Orientation Scenarios.

Let the agile teams focus on their parts of the Orientation Scenarios over the next iteration(s).

Target Audience: Stakeholders, Non-IT Domain Experts, BAs, Developers, Architects, QMs, Agilists
Prerequisites: Project experience, basic knowledge of DDD, basic knowledge of agile methods
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Scenario Casting is a collaborative planning and requirements engineering method that has emerged over the past four years in various Domain-Driven Design projects. It is used intensively with dozens of teams most of them involved in ambitious transformation projects.
Scenario Casting is especially helpful for getting a handle on complex or even overwhelming domains. If your domain feels like this and there are a lot of people involved too, you should give Scenario Casting a try.
Scenario Casting lays the groundwork for focused collaborative modeling sessions using domain storytelling or event storming. It ensures that all relevant points are addressed step by step. Also, it helps to quickly identify your domain's subdomains and determine the people who should be involved.

More relevant scenarios are discovered during collaborative modeling. They all go into the Scenario Backlog and will be considered in future Scenario Castings.
Unlike other concepts that try to scale agile, the Scenario Backlog is strictly limited to DDD's problem space, thus avoiding upfront design and premature planning.
Instead, Scenario Casting sets a common focus in problem space for agile teams by defining Orientation Scenarios. An Orientation Scenario illuminates parts of the problem space very precisely. It defines the actual results that solutions must deliver from a domain perspective - but without prescribing specific solutions. Finding and implementing good solutions remains the responsibility of the individual agile teams!

This talk contains examples from real projects and gives you best practices - so you get a good idea of how to try Scenario Casting yourself!

Jörn Koch is an agile and DDD coach and trainer. He worked many years as a developer and architect. Jörn loves ambitious projects in highly collaborative environments. He has practical experience as an agile coach for 15 years, and as a DDD coach for 6 years.

Jörn Koch
Jörn Koch
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 1.2
Your APIs on Steroids: Retrofitting GraphQL by Code, Cloud-native or Serverless
Your APIs on Steroids: Retrofitting GraphQL by Code, Cloud-native or Serverless

With GraphQL a modern and flexible way of providing APIs for our data is emerging.
The clients specify which data they need, the provisioning of data becomes more flexible and dynamic. Over-fetching or under-fetching are history.
But does this mean we have to rewrite all APIs to benefit? How can we retrofit a GraphQL API onto our existing API landscape?
We will explore three different approaches.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in API design and Java
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
In this talk we explore three different alternatives:
- The Developer Way: Writing a GraphQL API layer by hand
- The Cloud-native Way: Using lightweight API gateways such as Gloo or Tyk
- The Serverless Way: Using Cloud Provider native services
We will look at all three approaches conceptually and justify when and why each makes sense. Additionally, we will show in a live demo how GraphQL APIs can be added to an existing REST API.

Sonja Wegner is Lead Software Architect at QAware. Her current focus is on design and implementation of complex systems and software architectures.

Stefan Schmöller is Senior Software Engineer at QAware. He is mainly interested in Java frameworks and microservice architectures.

Sonja Wegner, Stefan Schmöller
Sonja Wegner, Stefan Schmöller
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 5.2
Cloud Chaos and Microservices Mayhem
Cloud Chaos and Microservices Mayhem

The cloud has fundamentally changed how we design applications and introduced whole new categories of software-development disasters. With a focus on Java, this talk will introduce some of the new tools, patterns, and best practices for modern distributed application development. It also gives a tour of some of the most painful anti-patterns Holly has seen as a cloud consultant.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Strategic Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Basic experience of cloud computing, Knowledge of Java
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The cloud is just someone else's data center, but it has fundamentally changed how we design software and what we expect from our platforms. Our applications have gotten bigger, more distributed, and more complicated, and there are whole new categories of mistakes we can make. Some things that were a good idea ten years ago turn out to be a terrible idea in the cloud; and what used to be ‘good enough’ for testing really isn’t anymore. Managing microservices architecture demands a lot of us, to ensure observability, operational resiliency, and organisational agility. With a focus on Java, this talk will introduce some of the new tools, patterns, and best practices for modern distributed application development. It also gives a tour of some of the most painful anti-patterns Holly has seen as a cloud consultant.

Holly Cummins is a Senior Principal Software Engineer on the Red Hat Quarkus team. Before joining Red Hat, Holly was a long time IBMer, in a range of roles from cloud consultant, full-stack javascript developer, WebSphere Liberty build architect, JVM performance engineer, to innovation leader. Holly is also a Java Champion, author, and regular keynote speaker. You can follow her on twitter at @holly_cummins or at hollycummins.com.

Holly Cummins
Holly Cummins
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 6.2
Modern Product Leadership – Solution-Focused Coaching Skills as Enabler for High Performance
Modern Product Leadership – Solution-Focused Coaching Skills as Enabler for High Performance

As Product Leaders, the methods we use are fairly easy to understand but the collaboration with others to get to the desired results sometimes is a hard nut to crack in a complex software engineering world. This talk will provide insights in solution-focused coaching skills being used in the product role and break the common belief that coaching is only relevant for Agile Coaches. It will show how solution-focused coaching skills have been used to solve several challenges on individual, team and organizational level.

Target Audience: Product Leader, Product Owner, Product Executives, Agile Coaches, Scrum Master
Prerequisites: Experience in Product Management / Product Ownership
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
In product management, there are a lot of methods we use (user stories, product backlogs, impact mapping, etc.) and usually they are easy to understand. However, to be truly successful we have to closely work together with people to get to the desired results and in a complex world - this sometimes feel tedious. We have to communicate strategy, manage different expectations, have to lead great user interviews, get devs and all other stakeholders on board, deal with "resistance" and emotional customers and users. Our stakeholders expect a lot from us and sometimes it just feels overwhelming.

Solution-focused coaching skills can help to improve communication towards stakeholders, deal with "resistance" in a helpful way, come to collaborative (and also better) results much faster and much more. The solution-focused mindset and toolbox helped me personally to improve collaboration not only in my Scrum team but also in the Product Leader team and the overall organization. It enabled me to benefit from emotional customers to the advantage of the product. I lead much more efficient meetings now and use the full potential of user interviews to get and understand the core need. And in the end, everything leads closer to the general goal of Product Leaders: maximizing the value for the user.

The goals of this talk are to provide insights in solution-focused coaching skills being used in Product Leader roles and break the common belief that coaching is only relevant for Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches. It will provide small learning nuggets (f. e. linguistic turns, powerful questions for "resistance") and real-life examples how solution-focused coaching skills have been used to solve several challenges on individual, team and organizational level.

The one thing that Alexander Angelo Giurca enjoys most is when he sees that he can support individuals or teams to get one step further. He has done this since he started his professional career. His begin was building up a boutique consultancy focusing on unconventional business modelling and change formats for big corporations (mostly management teams) which helped them one step towards more innovation. Then he was in a consultant role focusing on executives, supporting them in product development. Now he is Product Owner at Untis GmbH for a 5 mio. users software that enables schools to run smoothly. And when he comes to OOP, he is in the solution-focused consultancy team at sinnvollFÜHREN GmbH. He also supports other product companies and leaders as a solution-focused coach and sparring partner and run Training from the BACK of the Room workshops as a certified trainer. He is really passionate about what he does and always very excited to share his knowhow!

Alexander Angelo Giurca
Alexander Angelo Giurca
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 7.2
Climate Bookkeeping – Making a Big Impact with a Small Team
Climate Bookkeeping – Making a Big Impact with a Small Team

Over 95 % of companies in the EU are small businesses with less than 250 employees. Many of them would like to reduce their carbon emissions but very few have the knowledge and time needed to take action.
Reaching a sizable fraction of these companies with actionable information about their carbon footprint has a huge potential for climate impact. But is that possible for an organization with less than 10 employees? While also working at a sustainable pace?

Target Audience: Everybody willing to explore how to build software for our future
Prerequisites: Basic technical knowledge helps - there will be system design diagrams and tech buzzwords
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Fighting the climate crisis is urgent today and it will continue to be urgent for years and years to come. That means we must approach the fight at a sustainable pace to keep on working for a better future for a long time.

GoClimate is a company founded for the sole purpose of stopping climate change, but also with the ambition of creating a healthy organization with the resilience to withstand the challenges of today and tomorrow. But is it possible to have an impact on such a huge problem with a team of only 10 people and no overtime?

Using GoClimate’s endeavors to scale climate consciousness in small businesses as an example, we’ll explore the topic of working for sustainability in a sustainable way: the constraints, the workarounds, the dead ends and the liberation of rethinking what a company needs to be.

Since many years Pia Fåk Sunnanbo is a software engineer with experience from a wide range of languages, environments and domains. She loves deleting code and using the simplest tools possible. Fascinated how humans create technology and technology changes human behavior and lives. She holds a firm belief that software engineering knowledge is a huge power in today's society. It's our responsibility to use it for good. Works full time to stop climate change.

Pia Linnea Fåk Sunnanbo
Pia Linnea Fåk Sunnanbo
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14:30 - 15:30
Mi 1.3
The Architecture Hamburger – Software Achitecture for the Golden 20s
The Architecture Hamburger – Software Achitecture for the Golden 20s

How to structure your program right? This has been a central question since the beginning of software development. Layers are a start, but not enough. Hexagonal, Onion, and Clean Architecture have joined the club together with DDD's Tactical Design and Pattern Languages. Great system design is not achieved with one of these alone. Putting all the ingredients together we can build the Architecture Hamburger – the combination that makes high quality software possible.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Experience in mid-size to large projects
Level: Advanced

Henning Schwentner loves programming in high quality. He lives this passion as coder, coach, and consultant at WPS – Workplace Solutions in Hamburg, Germany. There he helps teams to structure their monoliths or to build new systems from the beginning with a sustainable architecture. Microservices or self-contained systems are often the result. Henning is author of “Domain Storytelling – A Collaborative Modeling Method” and the www.LeasingNinja.io as well as translator of “Domain-Driven Design kompakt”.

Henning Schwentner
Henning Schwentner
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14:30 - 15:30
Mi 5.3
Can High Performing Software Solve the Climate Crisis?
Can High Performing Software Solve the Climate Crisis?

Green software engineering is an emerging discipline and being a part of the climate change solution is a relatively new part of many software companies' strategy. For some of us, building resource efficient solutions is something we have already done for a long time, but we called it performance work. Where do the two meet and when are they different? This talk introduces the field of green software engineering and explains where it intersects with performance optimizations, giving you the tools to take an active part in the climate solution.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of software and performance metrics like latency and resource utilization
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Software has a huge carbon footprint and impact our global commitment to keep global warming to no more than 1.5°C – as called for in the Paris Agreement. To reach this goal, emissions need to be reduced by 45 % by 2030 and reach net zero by 2050. The rising interest in getting a better handle on the carbon emissions of software has garnered interest from the research and practitioner communities across industry, government, academia, and civil society.

The objective of this session is to break beyond surface-level discussions and dive deep into understanding the challenges and opportunities related to assessing and mitigating the carbon impacts of software systems, through the lens of high performing software.

Sara Bergman is a Senior Software Engineer at Microsoft Development Center Norway working in a team which owns several backend APIs powering people experiences in the Microsoft eco-system. She is an advocate for green software practices at MDCN and M365. She is a member of the Green Software Foundation and the chair of the Writer's project which is curating and creating written articles on the main GSF website and the GSF newsletter.

Sara Bergman
Sara Bergman
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14:30 - 15:30
Mi 8.3
Test-Driven Requirements Engineering: Agile Testing in Practice
Test-Driven Requirements Engineering: Agile Testing in Practice

Requirements engineering like testing require balance of value and risk. Agile requirements engineering and testing with test-driven requirements engineering (TDRE) balances project risks and cost. Clear advantage: Requirements are understandable, testable, and directly applicable as test case. Lead time and costs in testing are reduced by up to thirty percent.

This presentation at OOP 2023 will practically introduce to agile requirements engineering and test with TDRE. A case study demonstrates an industry use of TDRE.

Target Audience: Project Managers, Architects, Analysts, Requirements Engineers, Product Owners, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Requirements engineering like testing require balance. Balance is about balancing value and risk. Requirements must be good enough to mitigate risks but yet not overly specific to contain effort. Same for test, which though never complete needs to address those areas with highest risk.

Requirements engineering and testing belong together. Historically, testers have often only seen the requirements after the system has already been partially implemented. This had two serious disadvantages. On the one hand, insufficient requirements quality came far too late to the table. On the other hand, it was quite a lot of extra work without deriving suitable test cases in the context of requirements definition. A lot of additional work and long correction loops were the result.

Only an agile balance of risk-oriented coverage and testable requirements can improve test effectiveness. Such risk-oriented work also optimizes requirements engineering. Instead of paralysis by analysis in defining numerous requirements, test-driven requirements engineering (TDRE) focusses on specifying what is necessary and of high risk or high value.

TDRE is straight-forward: Test cases are developed in parallel to the requirements. Thus, the feasibility of the requirements is analyzed much faster than in the traditional sequential approach, in which tests are specified relatively late. The test cases are initially described in the same structure as the requirements and as a supplement to the respective requirements. This shifts Test-Driven Development (TDD), which has already proven itself as relevant agile methodology, to the specification level. Regression tests are attributed in order to prepare for later automation. The effort required for testing can be better estimated on this basis, and project and quality risks are thus reduced.
TDRE follows a triple peak model, which is connecting requirements (i.e., needs), design (i.e., solution) and test (i.e., the product).

It intertwines three perspectives:
•    Market perspective: “How can I meet customer satisfaction and needs?”
•    Design perspective: “How can I implement the solution to meet requirements?”
•    Testing perspective: “How can I find a defect and cause the product to fail?”

Here some guidance from our projects, which we will further illustrate in this presentation:
•    Every single functional requirement has at least one acceptance check, which is either fulfilled or not fulfilled and serves as the agile DoD (definition of done).
•    Each individual quality requirement is described with numerical values that can be measured.
•    Business rules are defined so that it can be determined whether they are true or false.
•    Business and data objects are defined with all their attributes, types and states so that they can be set and validated at test time.
•    System interfaces such as GUIs, reports and service interfaces are included in the requirements document so that values can be assigned to them.
•    All use cases have pre- and post-conditions that can be generated and validated.
•    All text is marked so that it can be automatically processed to generate test cases.

Agile requirements engineering and testing with test-driven requirements engineering (TDRE) balances project risks and cost. Clear advantage: Requirements are understandable, testable, and directly applicable as test case. Lead time and costs in testing are reduced by up to thirty percent. This presentation at OOP 2023 will practically introduce to agile requirements engineering and test with TDRE. A case study from medical cybersecurity demonstrates an industry use of TDRE.

Christof Ebert is managing director at Vector Consulting Services. He supports clients around the world in agile transformations. Before he had been working for ten years in global senior management positions. A trusted advisor and a member of several of industry boards, he is a professor at the University of Stuttgart and at Sorbonne in Paris. He authored several books including "Requirements Engineering" published by dPunkt and in China by Motor Press. He is serving on the editorial Boards of "IEEE Software" and "Journal of Systems and Software (JSS)".

Christof Ebert
Christof Ebert
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15:45 - 16:30
KeyMi 2
KEYNOTE: Cloud Adoption Patterns
KEYNOTE: Cloud Adoption Patterns

Learn key patterns, practices, tools, and techniques which lead to successful cloud adoption. Lynn's work with research teams around genomic-scale data pipelines for human health will be highlighted in this keynote.

Independent Cloud Architect and Developer, Lynn is also the author of 35 cloud courses on Linked In Learning. She publishes GitHub (code) and Substack (articles).

Lynn Langit
Lynn Langit
Track: Keynote
Vortrag: KeyMi 2
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17:00 - 18:00
Mi 1.4
Initial Architecture Modeling: How Much is Too Much?
Initial Architecture Modeling: How Much is Too Much?

One of the fundamental strategies of Agile Modeling is that artifacts, including architecture models, should be just barely good enough (JBGE). Another way of saying this is your models should be sufficient for the task at hand, no more and no less. But sufficiency is contextual in nature, it depends.
In this session we will look at the issue of model sufficiency, exploring the risk factors that motivate us to model more as well as the conditions that enable us to model less.

Target Audience: Software Architects, Software Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of agile, understanding of software architecture
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
One of the fundamental strategies of Agile Modeling is that artifacts, including architecture models, should be just barely good enough (JBGE). Another way of saying this is your models should be sufficient for the task at hand, no more and no less. But sufficiency is contextual in nature, it depends.

In this session we will look at the issue of model sufficiency, exploring the risk factors that motivate us to model more as well as the conditions that enable us to model less. We model to think things through, to identify potential avenues for moving forward so that we can choose what we believe to be the most likely path for success. But the more effort we spend doing so potentially motivates us to make commitments earlier than we should and to lose time, and value, doing so. Balancing these tensions is how we determine model sufficiency in the context that we face. Proven agile architecture strategies that enable us to invest in less up-front modeling will also be explored. It's never just about modeling.

Agenda:
1. Architecture throughout the agile lifecycle.
2. What is initial architecture modeling?
3. What does it mean to be just barely good enough (JBGE)?
4. What risk factors motivate us to invest in more up-front modeling?
5. What factors enable us to invest in less up-front modeling?
6. What are the development practices that support an agile approach to architecture?

Scott Ambler is the Chief Methodologist of Ambysoft Inc. He is the creator of the Agile Modeling and Agile Data methods, as well as co-creator of PMI's Disciplined Agile tool kit. He has worked with organizations around the world to improve their software development ways of working (WoW). Scott is an award-winning author of 20+ books and an international keynote speaker.

Scott W. Ambler
Scott W. Ambler
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17:00 - 18:00
Mi 2.4
Sustainable Pace?! How Self-Care Actually Boosts Teamwork
Sustainable Pace?! How Self-Care Actually Boosts Teamwork

Finding the right balance at work is neither an individual task nor is it only a team’s responsibility. It’s an interaction of both - and more! Leaders also play a vital role as they often (still) have a higher organizational lever.

In this session I will:
1. define what sustainable pace is
2. share common pitfalls that can “unbalance” a system (i.e. team, department, whole company)
3. offer simple yet powerful self-care practices for individuals and for teams
4. mix in psychological background (e.g. on stress & coping)

YOU are invited!

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, System Engineers, Managers of all kind, Human Beings :)
Prerequisites: Curiosity and openness, some work experience is beneficial but not required
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Many of us have seen colleagues burn out or burned themselves out at work. Or even both. How many have seen successful “comebacks”, especially to the very same work context?
Burning out myself twice in my career, recovering from it, changing contexts, seeing other close colleagues struggling - all of this gave me a lot of first-hand experience.

Meanwhile I am independently working in the field as a professional coach with leaders, and as agile coach with teams. There I’ve witnessed lots of sustainable pace situations in organisations … and I've helped to change plenty of highly unsustainable conditions. Also, I dare to state, that the last two years of pandemic accidentally boosted unsustainable working conditions even more: borders between work and life started blurring for many, often without professional support how to cope and manage this. Uncertainty in life just added on top.

With my psychological background, focusing on health psychology, I have plenty of scientific models to build the practical experience I've gained with individuals and teams upon.
My session will enable especially tech people to get more aware of possible pitfalls. Yet awareness is only the first step!

After attending, YOU will have practices at hand and solid knowledge bits in your "backpack".
You will be ready to contribute finding the right balance - for you and your team(s).

Cosima Laube is an independent agile coach, leader & consultant with experience in a variety of industries (automotive, finance, healthcare, travel, public sector).
Having a strong background as developer and people lead in IT engineering, over the last decade Cosima enhanced her portfolio with solid coaching skills (ICF-PCC) and university studies focused on I/O- and Health Psychology. Besides work, you likely find her running or on a bike. Her credo at work and in life is: Achieving MORE - together!

Cosima Laube
Cosima Laube
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17:00 - 18:00
Mi 5.4
The Lost Art of Software Architects
The Lost Art of Software Architects

In 2022, is having a dedicated software architect still useful, or are there better ways to fulfil this role? The answer, as usual, is "it depends”.

Target Audience: Software Developers and Architects
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Traditional approaches to software architecture usually trigger thoughts of ivory tower dictators who are a long way removed from the process of building software, probably because they no longer write code anymore. This unfortunate stereotype of “architecture astronauts” delivering large design documents to the development team before running away to cause havoc elsewhere has unfortunately resulted in a backlash against having a dedicated architect on a software development team, particularly in environments where teams are striving to be autonomous and self-organising.
But, in 2022, is having a dedicated software architect still useful, or are there better ways to fulfil this role? The answer, as usual, is “it depends”.

Simon Brown is a renowned consultant specializing in software architecture, and the author of some of the most popular software architecture books, including „Software Architecture for Developers” (a developer-friendly guide to software architecture, technical leadership and the balance with agility). He is also the creator of the C4 model for visualizing software architecture, and the founder of Structurizr. Simon is a regular speaker at international software development conferences and travels the world to help organizations visualize and document their software architecture.

Simon Brown
Simon Brown
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmi 2
Better Decision Making with Stoic Agility: What Would Marcus Aurelius Do?
Better Decision Making with Stoic Agility: What Would Marcus Aurelius Do?

We all live in an increasingly complex world and decision making for leaders isn't getting any easier. However, a long time ago, it probably was equally challenging for the Roman Emperor - Philosopher King - Marcus Aurelius. When dealing with our current challenges as leaders (e.g. as product owners, scrum masters or in management), we can learn from ancient Stoic ideas that we are in control of our own decisions, but we cannot control outcome. This interactive session will leave you with focus on your own discipline, intent and decision making.

Target Audience: Leaders, Managers, Decision Makers, Product Owners, Scrum Masters, Project-, Programme Managers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
We live in a world of ever-growing complexity - however in his time it probably was just as complex for Philosopher King Marcus Aurelius, Roman emperor from 161 till 180. Stoicism teaches us we cannot control outcome, we have no influence on external factors. We can however control how we make decisions, how much effort we put into things and how we react to circumstances. And we can actively strive to do all of these things a bit better, every day.
Since Stoicism is a practical philosophy for people in real life, this session aims to leave you with some theoretical knowledge on Stoicism, the Stoic notion of what is in your control and what isn't, and mostly with practical suggestions and new habits to start with. Reflection on decision making and journalling is key, so please bring a journal to this session to make the most of the interactive parts of this session.

Maryse Meinen is a product leader, currently working in a product owner role, building a full-blown container platform for a new IT infrastructure, together with an awesome team. She is also an active practitioner of Stoic philosophy, trying to live according to values like "humans are made for cooperation", "wisdom" and "perseverance". Always keeping an eye on the human aspect of our work, she strives to humanise our workplace a bit more every day.

Maryse Meinen
Maryse Meinen
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmi 3
Coroutines From Scratch
Coroutines From Scratch

You've heard about this new feature in C++20, Coroutines, but it's the first time you have encountered this term? Then this talk is what you're looking for. We start from the beginning with just "normal" functions. Next, we introduce Coroutines. Using them, we explore the various customization points C++ offers. Another distinction we make is cooperative and preemptive multitasking, opening the door for another beauty of Coroutines, why we don't need locks.
By the end of this talk, you've learned what coroutines are and where you can use them.

Target Audience: Developers
Prerequisites: C++ knowledge
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
You've heard about this new feature in C++20, Coroutines, but it's the first time you have encountered this term? Then this talk is what you're looking for. We start from the beginning with just "normal" functions. Next, we introduce Coroutines.
Using them, we explore the various customization points C++ offers. We look at what the new keywords co_await, co_yield, and co_return are for.
Sadly, we also have to talk about how to write a generator for a coroutine since there is no STL part for that in C++20.
Another distinction we make is between cooperative and preemptive multitasking, opening the door for another beauty of
Coroutines, why we don't need locks.
By the end of this talk, you've learned what coroutines are and where you can use them.

Andreas Fertig, CEO of Unique Code GmbH, is an experienced trainer and consultant for C++ for standards 11 to 20.
Andreas is involved in the C++ standardization committee, in which the new standards are developed. At international conferences, he presents how code can be written better. He publishes specialist articles, e.g., for iX magazine, and has published several textbooks on C++.
With C++ Insights (https://cppinsights.io), Andreas has created an internationally recognized tool that enables users to look behind the scenes of C++ and thus understand constructs even better.
Before working as a trainer and consultant, he worked for Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH for ten years as a C++ software developer and architect focusing on embedded systems.

Andreas Fertig
Andreas Fertig
Vortrag: Nmi 3
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmi 4
Persuasion: It Takes More Than Information
Persuasion: It Takes More Than Information

Change happens one person at a time. As a leader, you are responsible for helping to persuade people to accept the change. Many of us have been taught persuasion techniques that focus on giving information … and then more information. How is this working for you? Might there be a better way? This session will give you the opportunity to prepare other methods of persuasion for the changes you want to make.

Target Audience: Anyone who sees problems in their organization and would like to help make change happen
Prerequisites: A desire to learn (and have some fun while you do)
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Change happens one person at a time. As a leader, you are responsible for helping to persuade people to accept the change. Many of us have been taught persuasion techniques that focus on giving information … and then more and more information. How is this working for you? Might there be a better way? This session will give you the opportunity to prepare other methods of persuasion for the changes you want to make. These will include an "elevator pitch" with a wake-up call, an "imagine that" exercise, and some stories to build an emotional connection with the people you are trying to persuade.

Mary Lynn Manns, PhD, is the co-author of two books with Linda Rising, "Fearless Change: Patterns for Introducing New Ideas" and "More Fearless Change: Strategies for Making Your Ideas Happen". She has led numerous presentations and workshops on the topic of change throughout the world at conferences and in organizations that include Microsoft, amazon.com, Apple, Procter & Gamble, and Avon.

Mary Lynn Manns
Mary Lynn Manns
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmi 5
Change Culture – Thing or Cult
Change Culture – Thing or Cult

Sustainability needs change-ability. This 90-min panel will have on three speakers on change. How to move many people or a company to change the status quo. This question addresses the needs of organizations and likewise the needs of our society.

Target Audience: Change Management People, Everyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
We will combine three speakers with 20 min Impulse talks. There will be biological brewed beer in different flavors to accompany the tasteful and inspiring talks. The audience will be able to ask questions and supply suggestions, the speakers will respond to that. Anke and Hannes will serve as referees and sommelier(e)s.
The three talks are:
Gina Häußge: Adventures in Open Source Development - how to change OS
Oftentimes when imagining how Open Source Software is developed, the following sort of picture is painted: teams of dozens of developers coordinating happily, handling constant software maintenance with a smile on their faces and often provided with company funding. This is an ideal picture that sadly and all too often doesn't reflect reality. So, the question remains: what is it like to create, develop, and maintain an Open Source project independently or with a small-sized team and an unsure funding situation?
Michael de Zan: Zwischen Sekte und Staatsreligion. Agile Rituale aus kulturhistorischer Perspektive
As a team, do we enjoy going to the retro as much as young people go to church on Sundays? Do we help shape agile events, or do we delegate them to priestly rite experts? Are we passionate about agile values, or do we live with the agile framework as with a state religion whose rituals we have to serve externally? The lecture takes a look at the agile rituals from a ritual-theoretical and cultural-historical perspective, shows parallels and offers a change of perspective in order to reflect on and further develop one's own rituals.
Anke Nehrenberg: “To boldly go …” - Definitions - Reflections - Observations - Predictions on ‘Culture of Growth’
We will start by exploring the concept of culture and continue with a self-localization: where are we today, what aspects does ‘growth’ bring to the party? Culture and organization not only are interdependent, they affect each other reciprocally. Most of this will sound familiar and may be boring, so let’s take it a bit further and explore the edges of our known universe: I will draw on observations and reflections of organizational culture and what may become important in a (galaxy) future not so far away.

Hannes Mainusch - impulsiver nerd-manager.
Dinge, die mich inspirieren, sind innovative Technologien, Röhrenradios und Radfahren. Und ich freue mich, wenn die Menschen um mich herum und ich lernen, besser zu werden. Veränderung beinhaltet Scheitern und Lernen, organisatorische Veränderung beinhaltet die Schaffung einer Lernumgebung. Also versuche ich, offen für neue Herausforderungen zu bleiben und gleichzeitig einen tollen und empathischen Job im Change-Management zu machen.
In den letzten Jahren war ich im IT-Management und Consulting tätig. 2016 haben wir die commitment GmbH & Co. KG als Experiment radikaldemokratischer Unternehmensberatung gegründet.

@moeglichewelten is Anke Nehrenberg’s  twitter handle and philosophy: it integrates what is possible and what is feasible. Connecting people, transforming/enhancing/expanding companies, developing leaders and shaping the digital transformation of organizations is her thing. She wanders the world as a T-shaped non-binary, long-distance runner and mental meta-level.

Gina Häußge is a passionate code monkey, gamer, hobby baker, and creator and maintainer of OctoPrint. She has always been in love with code, and loves tinkering and helping others. Gina has written open source software for most of her adult life and has been in the lucky position to do it full time — and 100% crowdfunded by the community for her project OctoPrint for several years now. During this time, she has learned a lot about leading open source projects and managing communities.

Johannes Mainusch, Anke Nehrenberg, Gina Häußge, Michael de Zan
Johannes Mainusch, Anke Nehrenberg, Gina Häußge, Michael de Zan
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, (Donnerstag, 09.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:30
Do 1.1
Loosely or Lousily Coupled? Understanding Communication Patterns in Microservices Architectures
Loosely or Lousily Coupled? Understanding Communication Patterns in Microservices Architectures

In a microservices architecture, services shall be as loosely coupled as possible. Still, they need to communicate with each other in order to fulfill business requirements. This talk will help you shape an answer for the typical questions (like shall I be synchronous or asynchronous and what's a good protocol to use?). You will better understand not only the architectural implications but also the effect on the productivity of your teams.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: Basic programming skills helpful
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
In a microservices architecture, services shall be as loosely coupled as possible. Still, they need to communicate with each other in order to fulfill business requirements. Now there are so many questions about this communication:

•    What are the general possibilities to communicate? For example, synchronous, asynchronous, or event-driven communication. What are the tradeoffs and which communication style should you prefer?
•    What is the influence on the coupling of your services? For example, asynchronous communication reduces temporal coupling between services.
•    What do I have to consider when selecting a certain communication style?

For example, you need to apply certain resilience patterns if you want to use synchronous communication.
This talk will help you answer these questions for your project. You will better understand not only the architectural implications but also the effect on the productivity of your teams.

Bernd Rücker is a software developer at heart who has been innovating process automation deployed in highly scalable and agile environments of industry leaders such as T-Mobile, Lufthansa, ING, and Atlassian. He contributed to various open-source workflow engines for more than 15 years and he is the Co-Founder and Chief Technologist of Camunda – an open-source software company reinventing process automation. He is the author of "Practical Process Automation" and co-author of "Real-Life BPMN".

Bernd Rücker
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09:00 - 10:30
Do 2.1
Pragmatic Scaling to Business Agility: Crafting Organisations for Innovation where People can Thrive
Pragmatic Scaling to Business Agility: Crafting Organisations for Innovation where People can Thrive

This interactive workshop presents a practical approach for scaling agile. The approach is based on five shifts needed in typical organisations to get agile to work well at scale. It guides how to find the right balance for each shift, using the current context of the organisation. In this way it not only presents the end state, but also the possible steps to implement each shift.

In this practical workshop participants will learn to assess their own organisation against the five shifts.

Target Audience: Leaders, Agile Coaches, Product Owners, Scrum Masters, Managers
Prerequisites: Experience with Scrum and Agile at team level
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Our approach is based around five shifts in leadership, organisational structure, processes, trust and transparency, and the learning organisation.
Participants will learn how to assess their own organisation against the five shifts. The result is a heat map which enables the next iteration in the organisation’s development to be visualised.
The participants will learn how leadership at all levels (including at team level), are involved in creating an organisation where people thrive and better business results can be achieved.

Carsten Jakobsen is a Registered Scrum Trainer and one of the early Agile and Scrum pioneers in Denmark. His career started with Sun Microsystems in Silicon Valley, and later he returned to Denmark where he joined Systematic in 1998. Since 2006 Carsten has led change management and transformations in organizations to adopt Scrum and Agile values. He has written several articles with Jeff Sutherland and is a speaker at international Agile conferences. Since 2017, Carsten has worked primarily with larger organizations to drive agile transformations. In most organizations he has done this with Scrum training, Agile workshops, onsite consultancy, and close collaboration with leaders in the organization.

Simon Roberts is an agile and leadership coach and Certified Scrum Trainer. He has used lightweight/agile methods since the late 1990s and works with organisations large and small to help them achieve better results by leveraging the power of self-organising teams. He has consulted for and led several large-scale agile transitions at DAX companies in Germany, is the author of several articles and speaks regularly at conferences on the subject of agile leadership. Simon holds an MBA specialising in Creativity, Innovation and Change from the Open University Business School.

Carsten Jakobsen, Simon Roberts
Carsten Jakobsen, Simon Roberts
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09:00 - 10:45
Do 3.1
Use Testing to Develop Better Software Faster
Use Testing to Develop Better Software Faster

As developers, our job is to deliver working software. With the shift to CI/CD and the move to the cloud, the need to have the right feedback at the right time only increases. There are many ways that testing can help us with that. Not only can testing help us verify our solution and prevent us from breaking things, it can also help us design our software, find flaws in our architecture and come up with better solutions. In this talk I will highlight some of the many ways that testing can help you to develop better software faster.

Target Audience: Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in Java
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Testing doesn't always get the attention it deserves in software development. Many developers claim to be bad at it, or are just not that interested. (These may or may not be related.)

As developers, our job is to deliver working software. With the shift to CI/CD and the move to the cloud, the need to have the right feedback at the right time only increases. There are many ways that testing can help us with that. Not only can testing help us verify our solution and prevent us from breaking things, it can also help us design our software, find flaws in our architecture and come up with better solutions.

In this talk I will highlight some of the many ways that testing can help you to develop better software faster.

Marit van Dijk is a software developer with 20 years of experience in different roles and companies. She loves building awesome software with amazing people and has contributed to open source projects like Cucumber and various other projects. She enjoys learning new things, as well as sharing knowledge on programming, test automation, Cucumber/BDD and software engineering. She speaks at international conferences, webinars and podcasts, occasionally writes blog posts and contributed to the book "97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know" (O’Reilly Media).

Micro-Service Delivery without the Pitfalls
Micro-Service Delivery without the Pitfalls

In this session I’ll examine some of the things that can go wrong when organisations jump headfirst into micro-service architectures without understanding the potential pitfalls.

I'll explain contract testing from the ground up. You'll learn how it can decouple micro-service dependencies during development, allowing your teams to work effectively. And I'll describe sophisticated, free, open-source tooling that helps integrate contract testing into your software lifecycle, giving you the confidence to release micro-services independently.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Decision Makers, Release Managers, DevOps
Prerequisites: English, basic software design/architecture, software lifecycle
Level: Advanced

Seb Rose has been a consultant, coach, designer, analyst and developer for over 40 years. He's now Developer Advocate with SmartBear Advantage, promoting better ways of working to the software development community.
Co-author of the BDD Books series "Discovery” and "Formulation" (Leanpub), lead author of “The Cucumber for Java Book” (Pragmatic Programmers), and contributing author to “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” (O’Reilly).

Marit van Dijk
Seb Rose
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09:00 - 10:45
Do 5.1
XP – 25 Years Later: Balancing New Tech and Proven Practices
XP – 25 Years Later: Balancing New Tech and Proven Practices

When Extreme Programming (XP) was first described 25 years ago the IT industry was in a different place. Since then, we've seen widespread adoption of agile approaches, the rise of the open source and public cloud ecosystems, and much more. And while these trends have improved our ability to deliver complex software systems, the mastery of the actual craft — working effectively in a team, delivering quality software at a sustainable pace — is as important as ever.

This talk will place XP into today's world of modern software development.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Erik Dörnenburg is a software engineer and passionate technologist. At Thoughtworks he helps clients solve their business challenges using modern technologies, platforms, and practices. On his long journey through the tech industry Erik encountered an abundance of new technologies, always seeking to understand their potential while at the same time bringing along proven engineering practices. Throughout his career Erik has been an advocate of agile values and open-source software.

Take it Back
Take it Back

Das agile Manifest wurde vor über 20 Jahren von Entwicklern für Entwickler geschrieben. Mittlerweile fühlt es sich aber immer mehr an, als ob die agile Bubble eine eigene Welt ist, die von Scrum Mastern und Agile Coaches übernommen wurde. Developer nehmen eher passiv an den vorgeschriebenen Meetings teil, statt den Prozess aktiv zu gestalten.
Was läuft da schief? Und wie können wir das ändern?
In dieser Session geht es um Motivation, sinnvolle Konflikte und Empowerment.

Zielpublikum: Architekt:innen, Entwickler:innen, Projektleiter:innen
Voraussetzungen: Projekterfahrung
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Ina Einemann ist als Agile Coach bei der Open Knowledge GmbH in Oldenburg tätig. Ihr Tätigkeitsumfeld umfasst neben ihrer Arbeit als Scrum Master auch Aufgaben aus dem Bereich PO und Requirements Engineering. Sie beschäftigt sich mit agilen Methoden und Vorgehensmodellen und berät Teams bei der Umsetzung agiler Praktiken. Sie ist außerdem einer der Hosts des Podcast "Mein Scrum ist kaputt".

Erik Dörnenburg
Ina Einemann
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 3.2
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Theoretical and Practical Reflections on Finding the Right Balance in your Organization
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Theoretical and Practical Reflections on Finding the Right Balance in your Organization

This talk covers the fundamentals of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), including key definitions and statistics. Moreover, the link between DEI, sustainability, and innovation will be made, including reflections on the importance but also complexity of finding a balance.

As part of this talk, I will link theory and research to my work as the Global Head of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in a fintech company, including giving practical examples of how we are embedding DEI into our organization.

Target Audience: People Leaders, Managers, Decision Makers, C-suite
Prerequisites: Open-mindedness, interest in DEI
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
What does diversity, equity, and inclusion have to do with sustainability and this year’s conference focus on “finding the right balance?” Everything.

In this talk, I will cover the basics of D, E, and I including definitions and statistics, including introducing various “diversity dimensions” and the concept of “intersectionality.” Then, I will link the DEI agenda to the people sustainability agenda, including showing how the world is already diverse and if your organization is not: how you are likely missing out on learning, development, innovation, user experience knowledge, and even market share.

In doing so, I will link theory and statistics to my work as Global Head of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in a fintech company, including giving practical examples on how we are embedding DEI into processes and policies. Finally, I will give reflections on how DEI is a journey that also must be balanced and prioritized, just as any other business priority, before opening up to audience questions.

Elizabeth Benedict Christensen, Ph.D. has extensive theoretical and practical experience in diversity, equity, and inclusion in the academic and business worlds. Elizabeth has taught at university-level about Diversity, Cultural Analysis, Communication, Research Methods and beyond. She completed a Ph.D. on sense of belonging before returning to the business world in 2017 to bridge theory with practice, including sharing her passion for DEI globally.

Elizabeth Benedict Christensen
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 5.2
You Don't Have to be a Conductor, to Make a Perfect Symphony Between Hype Driven and Legacy Development
You Don't Have to be a Conductor, to Make a Perfect Symphony Between Hype Driven and Legacy Development

You know the story, one dev in the team found out about this amazing new framework which will solve potentially aaaall your problems; but the product owner stops him right away. There is definitely no time until the next roadmap milestone is reached and you’re already late. We have introduced the tool Tech Radar – in two different organisational setups – to make technology strategy explicit.

In this talk I’ll share our learnings on how we made sure our teams don’t drown in legacy, train them on time for new tech and foster exchange across teams.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Team Lead
Prerequisites: Everyone interested in technology strategy
Level: Basic

Marita Klein works as Senior Cloud Architect at Bosch Engineering. She has worked in different domains and roles during her professional career: Frontend and Backend developer, Architect as well as team lead of a group of software engineers. In all these stations she has experienced the importance of technical exchange between experts and how making problems explicit and talking about them is the first step of a solution.

Marita Klein
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 7.2
Scale to Zero with Java and Save the Planet (and Money)
Scale to Zero with Java and Save the Planet (and Money)

Java applications are widely used and often several years old. You can use these applications in the cloud via lift-and-shift (helps nothing) or you can rewrite the application in cloud-native style and use the advantages of the cloud.

An alternative for existing applications is missing here. It must be possible to go to the cloud and use advantages such as serverless and scale-to-zero WITHOUT having to rewrite the entire application.
I will show what is already working well today and where the rough edges are.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Additional information:
In the session, we'll move an existing application to the cloud and save over 70 % of operating and maintenance costs with serverless and scale-to-zero.

Richard Fichtner is CEO and Principal Software Architect at XDEV Software GmbH and has worked in the software industry for more than 15 years, often at the interface between business and technology. He is involved in the open-source community to spread knowledge about Java technologies. He speaks at conferences and contributes to various open-source projects such as https://www.rapidclipse.com/. Richard is a leader of the Java User Group Oberpfalz, recognized as Oracle ACE and holds a Master of Science degree in applied computer science. He is passionate about enabling developer productivity and supports teams in the use of cloud solutions. His interests are Java, clean code, cloud, new technologies and everything pragmatic.

Richard Fichtner
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 9.2
OpenTelemetry from an Ops Perspective
OpenTelemetry from an Ops Perspective

The developers have instrumented the applications with OpenTelemetry — great! But that doesn't mean you're ready to roll it out in production yet. What do you need to keep in mind for your instrumentation infrastructure?

* Quick OpenTelemetry overview.
* Tradeoffs between the three architectures you use with OTel (depending on your vendor): vendor exporter vs OTel Collector vs OTel protocol support
* Sampling, including head vs tail based, and how to keep it representative and / or useful.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Software development knowledge and some monitoring experience is also helpful
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The developers have instrumented the applications with OpenTelemetry — great! But that doesn't mean you're ready to roll it out in production. What do you need to keep in mind for your instrumentation infrastructure? OpenTelemetry is THE emerging standard for monitoring and creating more observable systems. Starting with an overview, this talk then dives into two areas that make a big difference in cost, flexibility, and insights:

Firstly, the three possible integration architectures with vendor exporter, OpenTelemetry Collector, and native protocol support; and why a combination of Collector and native protocol are the most common choice today.
Secondly, sampling or how to get the big picture from a subset of the data (and cost). Here the tradeoffs evolve around head- vs tail-based sampling and how to keep the collected data representative and / or useful. It generally comes down to simpler and cheaper with the head-based approach, while the tail-based one is potentially more useful with higher overhead. And now it's time to roll it out in production!

Philipp Krenn lebt für technische Vorträge und Demos. Nachdem er mehr als zehn Jahre als Web-, Infrastruktur- und Datenbank-Entwickler gearbeitet hat, ist er mittlerweile Developer Advocate bei Elastic — dem Unternehmen hinter dem Open Source Elastic Stack, bestehend aus Elasticsearch, Kibana, Beats und Logstash. Auch wenn er in Wien zu Hause ist, reist er regelmäßig durch Europa und darüber hinaus, um über Open-Source-Software, Suche, Datenbanken, Infrastruktur und Sicherheit zu sprechen.
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Philipp Krenn lives to demo interesting technology. Having worked as a web, infrastructure, and database engineer for over ten years, Philipp is now a developer advocate and EMEA team lead at Elastic — the company behind the Elastic Stack consisting of Elasticsearch, Kibana, Beats, and Logstash.

Philipp Krenn
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14:30 - 15:30
Do 5.3
Leading AI Transformations
Leading AI Transformations

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its sub-domain, Machine Learning (ML), have been developing quickly. Your organization could be planning for or be in the middle of an AI transformation.

In this talk, I will speak from my own experience managing the strategy and delivery for AI/ML programs and discuss practical steps for the executive leadership to ensure the success of their AI strategy and delivery.

Target Audience: Project Leaders, IT Leaders, Executives, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Zorina Alliata is a Sr. Machine Learning Strategist at Amazon, working with global customers to find solutions that speed up operations and enhance processes using Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. Zorina helps companies across several industries identify strategies and tactical execution plans for their ML use cases, platforms, and ML at scale implementations.

Zorina Alliata
14:30 - 15:30
Do 6.3
Head ‘n’ HeartOps – A User's Guide to Emotions without “System Crashes”
Head ‘n’ HeartOps – A User's Guide to Emotions without “System Crashes”

You have emotions? Congrats, you are a (professional) human being! Now, how can you actually handle your emotions smartly in our still tech- & tool-focused IT world?

In professional situations like:
- dealing with human "legacy experiences"
- integrating "personal silos"
- interacting with ease with other human beings
- tackling stressful situations (e.g. conflicts) within a team

This session offers a set of science-based, pragmatic tools that are (almost) always accessible - like a Swiss Pocket Knife for engineers (and other humans :-)).

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, System Engineers, Managers of all kind, Human Beings :)
Prerequisites: Curiosity and openness for new ways of thinking (and behaviour)
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Oftentimes people think that having emotions or even “being emotional” means being unprofessional, being irrational or even being weak. That is wrong!

Being able to consciously deal with (your) emotions is a (professional) strength that can be learned and practised.

•    It contributes to better teamwork.
•    It promotes individual health.
•    It even is a leadership quality.

Join this session to bridge potential gaps between "tech" and "humans", between "hard" and "soft", between "us" and "them". Join and start right now with finding the 'right' balance...

Cosima Laube is an independent agile coach, leader & consultant with experience in a variety of industries (automotive, finance, healthcare, travel, public sector).
Having a strong background as developer and people lead in IT engineering, over the last decade Cosima enhanced her portfolio with solid coaching skills (ICF-PCC) and university studies focused on I/O- and Health Psychology. Besides work, you likely find her running or on a bike. Her credo at work and in life is: Achieving MORE - together!

Cosima Laube
Cosima Laube
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14:30 - 15:30
Do 7.3
Patterns of Sustainability – Going Green in IT
Patterns of Sustainability – Going Green in IT

Sustainability has become a huge topic. And software is eating the world. As a consequence, we are responsible for the growing ecological impact of the solutions we create.

In this session, we will discuss several sustainability patterns, ranging from the infrastructure level over design and development to requirements and processes that support us in reducing our carbon footprint - including trade-offs and tips for implementation.

After this session you will have a little toolbox for creating greener IT systems.

Target Audience: Architect, Lead Developer, Project Lead, Manager, Decision Maker
Prerequisites: Desire to create ecological sustainable IT solutions
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Sustainability - especially reducing our carbon footprint - has become a huge topic in many areas of our lives. And as software is eating the world, we are responsible for the growing ecological impact of the solutions we create.

In this session, we will look at more and less intuitive IT sustainability patterns at various levels that can help us to reduce our carbon footprint, including trade-offs and practical tips for implementation.

After this session you will have a better understanding how you can create greener IT systems and what it means in practice.

Uwe Friedrichsen travels the IT world for many years, always in search of innovative ideas and concepts. His current focus areas are system design, resilience, sustainability and making IT a (bit) better place. Often, you can find him on conferences sharing his ideas, or as author of articles, blog posts, tweets and more.

Uwe Friedrichsen
Uwe Friedrichsen
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15:45 - 16:30
KeyDo 2
KEYNOTE: Making Sure the New Platform is Actually an Improvement
KEYNOTE: Making Sure the New Platform is Actually an Improvement

Since the dawn of software development, programmers have been perpetually occupied with migrating our "legacy" code to "the new platform". As soon as we finish, it is obsolete, and we need to start over. Today we are typically in the midst of moving to the cloud. We need DevOps, microservices, new frontend frameworks ... there is always some new tool that promises to deliver much better value than our existing solutions. Millions - even billions - are spent on these initiatives. Are they worth it? For whom?
In this presentation we will go through various strategies and their tradeoffs. How can we work with our code bases, staff and users to maximise the actual value delivered? The answer will depend on many things. Be conscious of what exactly you are aiming to achieve.

Christin Gorman has more than 20 years experience with hands-on software development. She is currently working on a large migration project in the Norwegian healthcare sector. She has worked for both startups and large enterprises, on systems varying from real-time control systems to e-commerce. What is important in one field is not necessarily important in others. Both in writing and in presentations, she is known for her entertaining way of raising questions about established truths, and making people think about why they are working the way they do.
Sometimes controversial, but never boring.

Christin Gorman
Christin Gorman
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17:00 - 18:00
Do 1.4
Distributed Application Architecture Options – Frameworks, Kubernetes, Service Mesh & eBPF
Distributed Application Architecture Options – Frameworks, Kubernetes, Service Mesh & eBPF

Software Development based on a distributed architecture provides both several advantages and new challenges. In order to take advantage of the distribution it requires implementation of service discovery, routing, load-balancing, resilience mechanisms and more. These requirements can be covered by language frameworks or the underlying platform.

This talk will walk through a comparison of various approaches with focus on frameworks, Kubernetes and extending options like Service Meshes and eBPF. The talk will be lecture style with demo.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, DevOps
Prerequisites: Introductory style, basic IT and dev skills probably helpful, but not required
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Software Development based on a cloud-native (or distributed) architecture provides both several advantages and new challenges. In order to take advantage of the distribution it requires implementation of service discovery, routing, load-balancing, resilience mechanisms and more. Initially software frameworks provided dedicated implementations for API Gateways, Service Registries, Circuit Breakers and many more. These functionalities are declared as code dependencies and need to be set at build time.

With Kubernetes there are alternative options to address these requirements. Kubernetes provides concepts for service discovery, load-balancing and resilience. So-called service meshes extend this functionality with more granular network interaction. They are not part of the application code and can hence be added during runtime. A fairly new approach is emerging with the eBPF technology, which claims to enable service meshes with minimal overhead.

With this talk Matthias wants to explain "the why" of cloud-native application design and how various cloud-native technologies facilitate this. It shows the possibilities and limitations of technologies and which forms of integration can make sense. The talk mostly consists of graphical visualisations/explanations and contains a live demo.

Matthias Haeussler ist Principal Cloud Advocate bei der NovaTec Consulting GmbH und der Veranstalter des Stuttgart Cloud Foundry Meetups. Er berät Kunden bei deren Cloud Strategie und unterstützt aktiv Implementierungen und Migrationen. Daneben unterrichtet er Cloud Native Development an den Hochschulen für Technik in Stuttgart und Esslingen. Davor war er über 15 Jahre bei der IBM R&D beschäftigt. Er hält regelmäßig Vorträge auf nationalen sowie internationalen Konferenzen und Meetups wie z.B. WJAX, OOP, den IT Tagen sowie der KubeCon, IBM InterConnect & Cloud Foundry Summit.

Matthias Haeussler
Matthias Haeussler
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17:00 - 18:00
Do 3.4
You're in Charge – Now What?
You're in Charge – Now What?

What should you do if you are promoted or hired to be the first Head of Architecture in a big, international organisation? What should you do to shape the role to deliver value to the organisation and its customers? How do you work with many development teams to shape the current legacy spaghetti mess into a coherent system, without becoming a bottleneck?

In this talk I'll respond to all questions and more, by sharing my experience in becoming the first Head of Architecture in a big international organisation.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Senior Managers
Prerequisites: Knowledge of software architecture
Level: Expert

Extended Abstract:
In this talk I'll share my experience in becoming the first Head of Architecture in a big international organisation, and on how I shaped the role to deliver value both to the organisation and its customers. Among other things, I'll share what I did to:

- Work productively with the development teams and be relevant.
- Navigate the political landscape to influence decisions.
- Create an architectural decision process tailored to the needs of the organisation.
- Provide guidelines and constraints to decentralise decision making while avoiding chaos.

The attendees will get a better understanding of what the role encompasses, and future heads of architecture may get a better view of what expects them in this role.

Giovanni Asproni is a co-founder and CTO at Launch Ventures, https://launchventures.co. Before co-founding Launch Ventures he has worked for many years as a developer, architect, and consultant in projects of all sizes.
His expertise ranges from software design and programming to software project management, and agile software development. He has contributed two chapters to the book ’97 Things Every Programmer Should Know’ published by O’Reilly.

Giovanni Asproni
Giovanni Asproni
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17:00 - 18:00
Do 5.4
Creating Sustainable Change When Skeptics are Lurking
Creating Sustainable Change When Skeptics are Lurking

When you want to make a change, the skeptics are lying in wait throughout the process. You must continually recognize them if you want the change to be sustainable. Who are they and why are they resisting?

We want to be understanding but oh, they can be annoying. We are told to increase communication, but before shouting more information, we must understand why they are irritating us.

This presentation will provide some practical tips for identifying and dealing with resistance in your organization and perhaps in your personal life too.

Target Audience: Everyone who sees a need for change but also sees resistance
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
When you want to make a change, whether it be agile, AI, cloud, microservices, or anything (!), the resistors are lurking everywhere throughout the process. You must continually recognize them if you want to create a sustainable change. Who are they and why are they resisting? We want to be understanding but oh, they can be annoying. We are told to increase the communication, but first we must understand why they are irritating us before we are tempted to shout more information at them.

This fits into the conference theme of Finding the Right Balance because leaders must continually handle skepticism surrounding the change while, at the same time, moving the process forward at a rate that attempts to work for everyone. As the Signature Track describes, this presentation will, “illuminate the area of tension in which decisions can be made, but also to show practical tips and empirical values so that teams can make the appropriate decisions.”

In a fun and enlightening way, it will point out why resistors annoy us and offer some practical tips that attendees can use on Monday morning for identifying and dealing with this resistance in their organizations and perhaps in their personal lives too.

Mary Lynn Manns, PhD, is the co-author of two books with Linda Rising, "Fearless Change: Patterns for Introducing New Ideas" and "More Fearless Change: Strategies for Making Your Ideas Happen". She has led numerous presentations and workshops on the topic of change throughout the world at conferences and in organizations that include Microsoft, amazon.com, Apple, Procter & Gamble, and Avon.

Mary Lynn Manns
Mary Lynn Manns
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17:00 - 18:00
Do 7.4
The Next Decade of Software Is About Climate – What Is the Role of ML?
The Next Decade of Software Is About Climate – What Is the Role of ML?

Climate action and green software engineering has risen to the top of many technology companies' agenda. With accuracy hungry algorithms ML software is consuming more and more computational resources, largely benefiting from the increasingly better hardware. Are the results worth the environmental cost?

This talk introduces the field of green software engineering, showing options to estimate the carbon footprint and discuss ideas on how to make Machine Learning greener, giving you the tools to take an active part in the climate solution.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Data Scientists
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of the AI lifecycle
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
AI systems have a huge carbon footprint and impact our global commitment to keep global warming to no more than 1.5°C – as called for in the Paris Agreement. To reach this goal, emissions need to be reduced by 45 % by 2030 and reach net zero by 2050. The rising interest in getting a better handle on the carbon emissions due to the AI lifecycle has garnered interest from the research and practitioner communities across industry, government, academia, and civil society.

The objective of this learning series is to break beyond surface-level discussions and dive deep into understanding the challenges and opportunities related to assessing and mitigating the carbon impacts of AI systems.

This session will also walk through the Green Software foundation's Software Carbon Intensity specification and explain why how you measure impact matters.

Sara Bergman is a Senior Software Engineer at Microsoft Development Center Norway working in a team which owns several backend APIs powering people experiences in the Microsoft eco-system. She is an advocate for green software practices at MDCN and M365. She is a member of the Green Software Foundation and the chair of the Writer's project which is curating and creating written articles on the main GSF website and the GSF newsletter.

Sara Bergman
Sara Bergman
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18:30 - 20:00
Ndo 1
Being Agile about Architecture
Being Agile about Architecture

When building systems, it can be too easy to focus on features and overlook software qualities related to architecture. If not enough attention is given to qualities related to the architecture, technical debt and design problems can creep in until it becomes muddy with the effect of teams being less agile. Sustainable architecture requires ongoing attention, especially when there are evolving priorities, technical risks, and many dependencies. This talk presents practices for creating and evolving an architecture while remaining agile.

Target Audience: Architects, Managers, Coaches, Developers, POs, QA
Prerequisites: Understanding of Agile and Architecture is useful
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Being Agile, with its attention to extensive testing, frequent integration, and focusing on important product features, has proven invaluable to many software teams. When building complex systems, it can be all too easy to primarily focus on features and overlook software qualities, specifically those related to the architecture. Some believe that by simply following Agile practices — starting as fast as possible, keeping code clean, and having lots of tests — a good architecture will magically emerge. While an architecture will emerge, if there is not enough attention paid to it and the code, technical debt and design problems will creep in until it becomes muddy, making it hard to deliver new features quickly and reliably.
It is essential to have a sustainable architecture that can evolve through the project lifecycle. Sustainable architecture requires ongoing attention, especially when there are evolving priorities, a lot of technical risks, and many dependencies. This talk presents a set of patterns that focus on practices for creating and evolving a software architecture while being Agile. These practices include a set of tools that allow teams to define “enough” architecture at the beginning of the project and to manage the state and the evolution of the architecture as the project evolves.

Joseph (Joe) Yoder is president of the Hillside Group and principal of The Refactory. He is best known as an author of the Big Ball of Mud pattern, illuminating fallacies in software architecture. Joe teaches and mentors developers on agile and lean practices, architecture, flexible systems, clean design, patterns, refactoring, and testing. Joe has presented many tutorials and talks, arranged workshops, given keynotes, and help organized leading international agile and technical conferences.

Joseph Yoder
Joseph Yoder
Vortrag: Ndo 1
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18:30 - 20:00
Ndo 2
How to Upgrade a Ubiquitous Language into a Domain-Specific Language
How to Upgrade a Ubiquitous Language into a Domain-Specific Language

Language defines the boundary to our world: it sets what we can describe and what we can’t. This talk describes how to formalize a ubiquitous language into a domain-specific language. The resulting language is used for communication and collaboration as well as used as a basis for generating code, tests, configs, etc. The talk is based on industry cases from various domains, such as banking and insurance, industry automation and automotive.

Target Audience: Developers, Subject Matter/Domain Experts, Managers
Prerequisites: Experiences on applying some modeling language
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Language defines the boundary to our world: it sets what we can describe and also what we can’t. This talk describes how to formalize a ubiquitous language into a domain-specific language. The resulting language is then used for communication and collaboration, and also as a basis for generating code, tests, configuration, etc. The talk is based on industry cases from various domains, such as banking, insurance, industrial automation and automotive. A particular emphasis in industry cases is how experts from different fields can apply the same language. We will describe language definition cases from practice and illustrate how the created languages have become the cornerstone of development activities.

Juha-Pekka Tolvanen works for MetaCase. He has been involved in domain-specific languages and tools since 1991 and acted as a consultant world-wide on their use. Juha-Pekka has co-authored a book (Domain-Specific Modeling, Wiley 2008) and over 100 articles in software development magazines and conferences. Juha-Pekka holds a Ph.D. in computer science.

Juha-Pekka Tolvanen
Juha-Pekka Tolvanen
Vortrag: Ndo 2
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18:30 - 20:00
Ndo 4
Finding the Right Balance in Sustainability
Finding the Right Balance in Sustainability

Sustainability is an emerging concern in software. However, advances in software technology over the past years appear to be in conflict with this goal. Data centers promise virtually unlimited compute power and consume a lot of energy. DevOps and modern programming demand high resource utilization. Are we on a wrong path? Must we return to highly optimized assembler code? Or can we achieve sustainability by consciously balancing the advantages of modern software engineering with the proven practices of writing efficient software. Let’s explore.

Moderator: Frank Buschmann
Panelists: Sara Bergman, Jutta Eckstein, Pia Fåk Sunnanbo, Martin Lippert, Marcus Trapp

Target Audience: Everyone interested in sustainability in software engineering
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Frank Buschmann ist Senior Principal Engineer bei Siemens Corporate Technology in München. Dort erforscht er moderne Software-Architektur und Entwicklungsansätze für die industrielle Digitalisierung. Die Produktentwicklung unterstützt Frank bei der effizienten Anwendung dieser Technologien. Seine aktuellen Forschungsschwerpunkte sind Architekturen für Cyber-Physikalische Systeme, das Internet of Things, Intelligente Systeme sowie industrielles DevOps. Frank ist Co-Autor von vier Bänden der von John Wiley & Sons veröffentlichten 'Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture'.

Sara Bergman is a Senior Software Engineer at Microsoft Development Center Norway working in a team which owns several backend APIs powering people experiences in the Microsoft eco-system. She is an advocate for green software practices at MDCN and M365. She is a member of the Green Software Foundation and the chair of the Writer's project which is curating and creating written articles on the main GSF website and the GSF newsletter.

Jutta Eckstein arbeitet weltweit als Business-Coach, Change-Managerin & Beraterin. Ihr Fokus liegt auf unternehmensweiter Agilität in großen & verteilten Organisationen. Sie war von 2003 bis 2007 im Vorstand der AgileAlliance. Sie hat einen M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, einen Dipl.-Ing. in Product-Engineering und ist als Immissionsschutzbeauftragte (Umweltschutz) zertifiziert. Jutta wurde 2011 von der Computerwoche in die Top 100 der bedeutendsten Persönlichkeiten der Deutschen IT gewählt.

Since many years Pia Fåk Sunnanbo is a software engineer with experience from a wide range of languages, environments and domains. She loves deleting code and using the simplest tools possible. Fascinated how humans create technology and technology changes human behavior and lives. She holds a firm belief that software engineering knowledge is a huge power in today's society. It's our responsibility to use it for good. Works full time to stop climate change.

Martin Lippert is Spring Tools Lead and Sustainability Ambassador @ VMware.

Marcus Trapp unterstützt als Digital Designer seit vielen Jahren Unternehmen dabei, digitale Potenziale zu nutzen, insbesondere bei der Ideenfindung und initialen Ausgestaltung digitaler Ökosysteme.

Frank Buschmann, Sara Bergman, Jutta Eckstein, Pia Linnea Fåk Sunnanbo, Martin Lippert, Marcus Trapp
Frank Buschmann, Sara Bergman, Jutta Eckstein, Pia Linnea Fåk Sunnanbo, Martin Lippert, Marcus Trapp
Vortrag: Ndo 4
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