Conference Program

Please note:
On this page you will only see the English-language presentations of the conference. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2023 Digital correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "VORTRAG MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

Thema: DevOps

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  • Montag
    06.02.
  • Dienstag
    07.02.
  • Mittwoch
    08.02.
  • Donnerstag
    09.02.
, (Montag, 06.Februar 2023)
18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 4
Closing the Developer Experience Gap of your Container Platforms
Closing the Developer Experience Gap of your Container Platforms

Due to the lack of user focus, lots of container platforms have a big developer experience GAP.

That's not only because building a Kubernetes platform is complex but also because deploying applications on Kubernetes requires expertise in many Container and Kubernetes concepts.
Developers today shouldn’t have to care how their applications run and focus on adding business value.

In this session, we will explore some of the powerful open source technologies available within the Kubernetes ecosystem to close the developer experience gap.

Target Audience: Developers, DevSecOps
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in Kubernetes and software development
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Due to the lack of user focus, lots of container platforms have a big developer experience GAP.

That's not only because building a Kubernetes platform is complex but also because deploying applications on Kubernetes requires expertise in many Container and Kubernetes concepts. And once developers learn them, they still must spend a lot of time maintaining containers, writing YAML templates, and orchestrating many moving Kubernetes parts.

Like in the days when the Waterfall model was the standard for software development, developers today shouldn’t have to care where and how their applications run and focus on adding business value by implementing new features.

In this session, we will explore some of the powerful open source technologies available within the Kubernetes ecosystem to close the developer experience gap.

Timo Salm is based out of Stuttgart in southwest Germany and in the role of the first VMware Tanzu Solutions Engineer for Developer Experience in EMEA with a focus on VMware Tanzu Application Platform and commercial Spring products. In this role, he’s responsible for educating customers on the value, vision, and strategy of these products, and ensuring that they succeed by working closely on different levels of abstractions of modern applications and modern infrastructure.
Before Timo joined Pivotal and VMware, he worked for more than seven years for consulting firms in the automotive industry as a software architect and full-stack developer on projects for customer-facing products.

Timo Salm
Timo Salm
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, (Dienstag, 07.Februar 2023)
16:15 - 17:15
Di 9.3
If it is About Cloud Native Transformation ... It Is Still About People! (Experience Report)
If it is About Cloud Native Transformation ... It Is Still About People! (Experience Report)

I will share our hands-on experience with a cloud native (container) transformation that is currently unfolding. Technically, implementing an Open Shift Container Platform (bare metal) is pretty challenging. Doing this in a way that we will have pretty stuff in our data centers and at the same time making sure that our technical possibilities are actually being used effectively by product developers ... is a different challenge all together.

Join this session if you'd like to hear what we figured out about the people side of this kind of change!

Target Audience: Architects, Management, Developers, Operational Heroes, Product Owners, Agile Coaches, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of DevOps concepts
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
In this session I will share our hands-on experiences implementing a container-based architecture in our organisation. Choosing to implement Open Shift (bare metal) as your container platform is pretty difficult and challenging technically. It is also rather exciting and not too difficult to find smart people willing to help you build and run this new platform. However, it turns out that there is far more to this challenge than just the technology. Therefore, we are adopting an evolutionary implementation approach - stringing together small experiments - towards a flexible, more experimental and proactive culture that will allow us to actually benefit from the technical possibilities our new platform offers. This session is our story of our evolutionary and experimental approach and what we discovered along the way that works in this kind of transformation. Our main "discovery" is that even though at first it seemed mostly a technical transformation, it actually is far more of a human challenge.

We are right in the middle of this transformation so in this talk, I will bring you the latest and most valuable insights and experiences regarding this organisational and cultural transformation that is needed to turn the potential of our container platform into actual value for our organisation. We will summarise our ideas in a practical "this might work" list (bear in mind however there are no best practices, just patterns that might work in your specific situation).

An example of an experiment that turned out useful in our situation is: "create a small separate team that will drive this change". In our organisation we strive to build end-to-end teams, so at first we tried to get this new platform started from within the regular Infra DevOps team (as a huge Epic on the backlog). But people however got swamped in work and annoyed by all the context switching this required. Team members got tired and frustrated with the huge amounts of work, sky high ambitions and lack of progress. So, in the end we did a small experiment by creating a separate, dedicated, core team to get things going. This experiment turned out to be successful (and was thus extended) because it allowed team members to focus on the development of the platform and to build, document and share their experiences along the way, so that this team is also able to incrementally onboard the other teams along the way. Busy OPS-teams and product teams can't just develop the new platform on the side, next to all their other ongoing work. Building a container platform is epic and needs dedicated time and focus, also to keep people in their best energy.

I will share some of our most useful experiments and experiences, all having to do with the human side of this container transformation.

This session is not meant for decision making on going cloud native or not. If you do go cloud native, please bear in mind it is still about people, most of all!

Maryse Meinen is a product leader, currently working in a product owner role, building a full-blown container platform for a new IT infrastructure, together with an awesome team. She is also an active practitioner of Stoic philosophy, trying to live according to values like "humans are made for cooperation", "wisdom" and "perseverance". Always keeping an eye on the human aspect of our work, she strives to humanise our workplace a bit more every day.

Maryse Meinen
, (Mittwoch, 08.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Mi 3.1
Beyond Taming Technical Debt
Beyond Taming Technical Debt

Discipline, determination, a highly visible area, and a few sticky notes, are all you need to move beyond problems with technical debt.

Target Audience: Developers, Project Leader, Designers, Product Owners, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Basic Knowledge of Software Development Process
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
## Making great software is challenging
It doesn't matter how qualified a team is, it will never be able to produce perfect, flawless, entirely bug-free software.
While teams are discovering how to build the right software in the right way, the environment the team operates in changes.
This results in a constant reorientation of the product, and the corresponding software solution, which will cause gaps between how things work, and how they should work.
Unfortunately, the market won't wait infinitely until teams have addressed these issues in the software, and organizations tend to run out of patience too.
That is why teams often have to move forward with designs and code that are ... let's call them sub-optimal.
These gaps, they are technical debt: a loan against the future, where things will be fixed, at some point ... Hopefully.
According to a global survey performed by Stripe, Inc. amongst software engineers in 2018, researchers found that **engineers estimate to spend 17,3 hours per week on addressing technical debt**.
That same research established that developers work about 41.1 hours per week. With that in mind, addressing technical debt constitutes well over a third of the time a typical engineer spends per week.
**If engineers are spending that much time, how could they better utilize their attention?**
Why do they seem unable to gain control over this metric and push it downwards?
While technical debt sounds nice and predictable: "you just have to pay interest", it really is like a loan with a mobster, and not with a bank.
It will show up unannounced at your doorstep at 3.30 in the morning, demanding that you pay up now!
How can you prevent being surprised by this goon?! And what can you do to leverage the benefits of borrowing against the future?
Because when the conditions are right, taking out a loan and paying it back Tomorrow might just help you ship a better product today.

## Imagine...
- A lightweight process to discover technical debt without a big investment up front
- A data-driven approach to identify the technical debt that needs attention right now
- A system that is easy to introduce, and simple to enforce
- Something that will guide engineers to articulate technical debt in terms of our roadmap
- Which will ultimately improve the flow of work in your organization

## The Wall of Technical Debt™️
A few years ago [Mathias Verraes coined the term "_The Wall of Technical Debt_"][1]. During this presentation Marijn Huizendveld will show you how to institute such a process for managed technical debt. Doing so will provide you with a safety net that allows you to make "naive" design choices every now and again to ship your ideas as fast as possible, without sacrificing sustainable delivery in the long run.
[1]: verraes.net/2020/01/wall-of-technical-debt/

Marijn Huizendveld – In a small backstreet of Tokyo lives a man named Aki, a 78 years old former chef. Aki spent most of his life trying to perfectly cook the rice he buys from his friend Mato. He's been at it for 57 years now, and still searches for ways to improve his cooking methods. There is probably not too much anybody else could tell Aki about cooking this specific type of rice. When it comes to his process, Aki's understanding is unrivaled.
After years of trial and error, Marijn Huizendveld could be called the Aki of Domain-Driven Design, due to his extensive background in both programming and strategy. He uses this experience to show teams and organizations how to recognize and act on problems and opportunities in an autonomous, self-learning fashion.

Maintenance and Evolution of Large Scale Software Systems – Business, Dev & Ops Challenges
Maintenance and Evolution of Large Scale Software Systems – Business, Dev & Ops Challenges

Even in the time of agile software development and devOps, maintenance and evolution of large-scale software systems remain challenging. This is not only caused by technical debt, but is heavily caused by lost knowledge, high complexity of micro-service architectures, difficult requirements management, not available documentation, and the complexity of communication among and coordination of the many stakeholders. In our session we will talk about the challenges we identified in our study and present new approaches to address these challenges.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Project Management Experience, Software Maintenance
Level: Expert

Martin Kropp is professor for Software Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland. His interest is in everything that makes software development more efficient, build automation, testing, refactoring and development methodologies.

As a software engineer, Janick Rüegger worked in different teams from web development to platform engineering. In his master’s degree, he focuses on the challenges of large-scale software development.

Marijn Huizendveld
Martin Kropp, Janick Rüegger, Andreas Meier
Marijn Huizendveld

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Martin Kropp, Janick Rüegger, Andreas Meier
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, (Donnerstag, 09.Februar 2023)
11:00 - 11:45
Do 9.2
OpenTelemetry from an Ops Perspective
OpenTelemetry from an Ops Perspective

The developers have instrumented the applications with OpenTelemetry — great! But that doesn't mean you're ready to roll it out in production yet. What do you need to keep in mind for your instrumentation infrastructure?

* Quick OpenTelemetry overview.
* Tradeoffs between the three architectures you use with OTel (depending on your vendor): vendor exporter vs OTel Collector vs OTel protocol support
* Sampling, including head vs tail based, and how to keep it representative and / or useful.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Software development knowledge and some monitoring experience is also helpful
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The developers have instrumented the applications with OpenTelemetry — great! But that doesn't mean you're ready to roll it out in production. What do you need to keep in mind for your instrumentation infrastructure? OpenTelemetry is THE emerging standard for monitoring and creating more observable systems. Starting with an overview, this talk then dives into two areas that make a big difference in cost, flexibility, and insights:

Firstly, the three possible integration architectures with vendor exporter, OpenTelemetry Collector, and native protocol support; and why a combination of Collector and native protocol are the most common choice today.
Secondly, sampling or how to get the big picture from a subset of the data (and cost). Here the tradeoffs evolve around head- vs tail-based sampling and how to keep the collected data representative and / or useful. It generally comes down to simpler and cheaper with the head-based approach, while the tail-based one is potentially more useful with higher overhead. And now it's time to roll it out in production!

Philipp Krenn lebt für technische Vorträge und Demos. Nachdem er mehr als zehn Jahre als Web-, Infrastruktur- und Datenbank-Entwickler gearbeitet hat, ist er mittlerweile Developer Advocate bei Elastic — dem Unternehmen hinter dem Open Source Elastic Stack, bestehend aus Elasticsearch, Kibana, Beats und Logstash. Auch wenn er in Wien zu Hause ist, reist er regelmäßig durch Europa und darüber hinaus, um über Open-Source-Software, Suche, Datenbanken, Infrastruktur und Sicherheit zu sprechen.
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Philipp Krenn lives to demo interesting technology. Having worked as a web, infrastructure, and database engineer for over ten years, Philipp is now a developer advocate and EMEA team lead at Elastic — the company behind the Elastic Stack consisting of Elasticsearch, Kibana, Beats, and Logstash.

Philipp Krenn
Philipp Krenn
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15:45 - 16:30
KeyDo 2
KEYNOTE: Making Sure the New Platform is Actually an Improvement
KEYNOTE: Making Sure the New Platform is Actually an Improvement

Since the dawn of software development, programmers have been perpetually occupied with migrating our "legacy" code to "the new platform". As soon as we finish, it is obsolete, and we need to start over. Today we are typically in the midst of moving to the cloud. We need DevOps, microservices, new frontend frameworks ... there is always some new tool that promises to deliver much better value than our existing solutions. Millions - even billions - are spent on these initiatives. Are they worth it? For whom?
In this presentation we will go through various strategies and their tradeoffs. How can we work with our code bases, staff and users to maximise the actual value delivered? The answer will depend on many things. Be conscious of what exactly you are aiming to achieve.

Christin Gorman has more than 20 years experience with hands-on software development. She is currently working on a large migration project in the Norwegian healthcare sector. She has worked for both startups and large enterprises, on systems varying from real-time control systems to e-commerce. What is important in one field is not necessarily important in others. Both in writing and in presentations, she is known for her entertaining way of raising questions about established truths, and making people think about why they are working the way they do.
Sometimes controversial, but never boring.

Christin Gorman
Christin Gorman
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