Conference Program

Please note:
On this page you will only see the English-language presentations of the conference. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2023 Digital correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "VORTRAG MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

Thema: Agilität

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  • Montag
    06.02.
  • Dienstag
    07.02.
  • Mittwoch
    08.02.
  • Donnerstag
    09.02.
, (Montag, 06.Februar 2023)
10:00 - 17:00
Mo 1
ScaleAgility: Principles Over Frameworks for Sound Agile Organisations
ScaleAgility: Principles Over Frameworks for Sound Agile Organisations

Do you like some of what you find in the common scaling frameworks but don't buy-in to everything? Then, go to the essence!
This session will present and share a set of principles for scaling, which you can use to roll-your-own approach or properly contextualise the usage of an existing framework such as LeSS, Scrum@Scale or Nexus.

Unlike other scaling approaches, these guidelines are non-prescriptive and recognise the value of elements in many scaling frameworks.

Target Audience: Managers, Decision Makers, Agile Coaches
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of agile. Having been exposed to agile at scale projects is a plus
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
ScaleAgility is a set of principles to create sound scaled organisations.
Devised by a group of five trainers and coaches with a total of more than 70 years of experience in large-scale agile implementations, these principles aim to expose the tensions inherent in any organisational development initiative and provide guidance to discuss and develop strategies and tactics for transforming a company.
In this workshop we will discuss:

  1. A set of general principles to consider when creating large-scale agile organisations
  2. How properly defining products and the way the product definition evolves are fundamental for large-scale agility
  3. A path for Teams to evolve from localised responsibility to feature Teams
  4. How the Leadership should accompany the change

Pierluigi Pugliese is active as Agile Coach, Systemic Consultant and Trainer. He has a long experience in various roles in software development organisations and complex international projects.
He started hacking code so long ago that he cannot remember exactly when anymore. After many years various roles in the mobile telecommunication business, he works as a consultant for software organisations and coach for individuals and teams, focusing on software development and software processes, helping them implementing sound and agile solutions.

Blog: http://www.connexxo.com/blog

Simon Roberts is an agile and leadership coach and Certified Scrum Trainer. He has used lightweight/agile methods since the late 1990s and works with organisations large and small to help them achieve better results by leveraging the power of self-organising teams. He has consulted for and led several large-scale agile transitions at DAX companies in Germany, is the author of several articles and speaks regularly at conferences on the subject of agile leadership. Simon holds an MBA specialising in Creativity, Innovation and Change from the Open University Business School.

Since 2005 Colin Bird is assisting organisations in many sectors to wrestle with the challenges of retaining agility as the scale of the challenge moves beyond a single team.

Pierluigi Pugliese, Simon Roberts, Colin Bird, Matt Roadnight, Jan Olsen
Pierluigi Pugliese, Simon Roberts, Colin Bird, Matt Roadnight, Jan Olsen
Vortrag: Mo 1
Themen: Agilität
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 1
Architecture as Knowledge
Architecture as Knowledge

It is common to consider software architecture as structure, as infrastructure, as code, as technologies, as models, and so on, but what if we consider software architecture as knowledge? The idea that software architecture is the set of significant decisions about a system is not a new one, but those decisions represent knowledge.

When we embrace the idea of knowledge as a first class concept, that has implications for our documentation (such as architecture decisions records), for our code and for our development process.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Managers, Coaches, Leaders
Prerequisites: No specific prerequisites
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
It is common to consider software architecture as structure, as infrastructure, as code, as technologies, as models, and so on, but what if we consider software architecture as knowledge? The idea that software architecture is the set of significant decisions about a system is not a new one, but those decisions represent knowledge.

When we embrace the idea of knowledge as a first class concept, that has implications for our documentation (such as architecture decisions records), for our code and for our development process.
This session will explore a number of concepts and practices that relate architecture to existing development practice and agile approaches. It will revisit patterns, explore ADRs, relate architecture to lean thinking, PDSA, hypothesis-driven development, and more.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His development interests are in programming, practice and people. He is co-author of two volumes in the ”Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture” series, and editor and contributor for multiple books in the ”97 Things” series. He lives in Bristol and online.

Kevlin Henney
Kevlin Henney
Vortrag: Nmo 1
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, (Dienstag, 07.Februar 2023)
16:15 - 17:15
Di 5.3
Trauma-informed Agile – How I Adapted my Practice to Latest Knowledge in Psychology
Trauma-informed Agile – How I Adapted my Practice to Latest Knowledge in Psychology

In recent decades, our scientific and clinical understanding of how our nervous system works has increased tremendously. I’ve recently completed an education for trauma-informed work (NARM informed professional). It has changed many key aspects of how I teach and coach and will continue to have a large impact.

In this session, I’m presenting those key learnings, connecting them to well-known parts of Agile knowledge and inviting into a discussion of what a more trauma-informed approach to leading people in Agile organisations could look like.

Target Audience: All kinds of Leaders, Product Owners, People Managers, Decision Makers, Coaches, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: No prerequisites
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
In recent decades, our scientific and clinical understanding of how our nervous system develops and works has increased tremendously. Its implications are so profound, they radiate far beyond the field of psychology. Topics such as trauma-informed law, trauma-informed volleyball coaching, legal counseling, education, social activism have arisen. It is time to think about how it affects leadership.

Your speaker Anton, a Scrum trainer and coach, has recently completed a NARM-informed professional education. It has tremendously changed some key aspects of how he leads, teaches and coaches and will surely continue to have a large impact. In this session, he is presenting those key learning, connects them to well-known parts of Agile knowledge and invites into a discussion of what a more trauma-informed approach to leadership could look like.

In this talk you will:
•    experience a more calmer vulnerable space
•    learn what developmental trauma is and how it plays out in the workplace
•    learn about regulation and states of our nervous systems and its connection to creativity and cognitive capacity
•    get a new angle to think and act about topics such as responsibility, clarification of assignments and setting goals, teaching, mentoring and more
•    reflect on how these topics affects your own line of work and exchange on ideas

Anton Skornyakov is an Agile Coach and CST® for Scrum Alliance®, an experienced speaker and facilitator at many conferences, user groups for topics around Agile, facilitation, non-violent communication and leadership. Largest spaces were GSG Munic 2016, GSG Vienna 2019, OOP Munic 2019. However, there were many more at local conferences, user groups and meetups.
Most relevant to the topic Anton is speaking about, is his recently finished education as a NARM®-informed professional with the NARM® Training Institute. NeuroAffective Relational Model® (NARM®) is a unique and powerful approach to developmental trauma.

Anton Skornyakov
Anton Skornyakov
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, (Mittwoch, 08.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Mi 3.1
Beyond Taming Technical Debt
Beyond Taming Technical Debt

Discipline, determination, a highly visible area, and a few sticky notes, are all you need to move beyond problems with technical debt.

Target Audience: Developers, Project Leader, Designers, Product Owners, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Basic Knowledge of Software Development Process
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
## Making great software is challenging
It doesn't matter how qualified a team is, it will never be able to produce perfect, flawless, entirely bug-free software.
While teams are discovering how to build the right software in the right way, the environment the team operates in changes.
This results in a constant reorientation of the product, and the corresponding software solution, which will cause gaps between how things work, and how they should work.
Unfortunately, the market won't wait infinitely until teams have addressed these issues in the software, and organizations tend to run out of patience too.
That is why teams often have to move forward with designs and code that are ... let's call them sub-optimal.
These gaps, they are technical debt: a loan against the future, where things will be fixed, at some point ... Hopefully.
According to a global survey performed by Stripe, Inc. amongst software engineers in 2018, researchers found that **engineers estimate to spend 17,3 hours per week on addressing technical debt**.
That same research established that developers work about 41.1 hours per week. With that in mind, addressing technical debt constitutes well over a third of the time a typical engineer spends per week.
**If engineers are spending that much time, how could they better utilize their attention?**
Why do they seem unable to gain control over this metric and push it downwards?
While technical debt sounds nice and predictable: "you just have to pay interest", it really is like a loan with a mobster, and not with a bank.
It will show up unannounced at your doorstep at 3.30 in the morning, demanding that you pay up now!
How can you prevent being surprised by this goon?! And what can you do to leverage the benefits of borrowing against the future?
Because when the conditions are right, taking out a loan and paying it back Tomorrow might just help you ship a better product today.

## Imagine...
- A lightweight process to discover technical debt without a big investment up front
- A data-driven approach to identify the technical debt that needs attention right now
- A system that is easy to introduce, and simple to enforce
- Something that will guide engineers to articulate technical debt in terms of our roadmap
- Which will ultimately improve the flow of work in your organization

## The Wall of Technical Debt™️
A few years ago [Mathias Verraes coined the term "_The Wall of Technical Debt_"][1]. During this presentation Marijn Huizendveld will show you how to institute such a process for managed technical debt. Doing so will provide you with a safety net that allows you to make "naive" design choices every now and again to ship your ideas as fast as possible, without sacrificing sustainable delivery in the long run.
[1]: verraes.net/2020/01/wall-of-technical-debt/

Marijn Huizendveld – In a small backstreet of Tokyo lives a man named Aki, a 78 years old former chef. Aki spent most of his life trying to perfectly cook the rice he buys from his friend Mato. He's been at it for 57 years now, and still searches for ways to improve his cooking methods. There is probably not too much anybody else could tell Aki about cooking this specific type of rice. When it comes to his process, Aki's understanding is unrivaled.
After years of trial and error, Marijn Huizendveld could be called the Aki of Domain-Driven Design, due to his extensive background in both programming and strategy. He uses this experience to show teams and organizations how to recognize and act on problems and opportunities in an autonomous, self-learning fashion.

Maintenance and Evolution of Large Scale Software Systems – Business, Dev & Ops Challenges
Maintenance and Evolution of Large Scale Software Systems – Business, Dev & Ops Challenges

Even in the time of agile software development and devOps, maintenance and evolution of large-scale software systems remain challenging. This is not only caused by technical debt, but is heavily caused by lost knowledge, high complexity of micro-service architectures, difficult requirements management, not available documentation, and the complexity of communication among and coordination of the many stakeholders. In our session we will talk about the challenges we identified in our study and present new approaches to address these challenges.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Project Management Experience, Software Maintenance
Level: Expert

Martin Kropp is professor for Software Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland. His interest is in everything that makes software development more efficient, build automation, testing, refactoring and development methodologies.

As a software engineer, Janick Rüegger worked in different teams from web development to platform engineering. In his master’s degree, he focuses on the challenges of large-scale software development.

Marijn Huizendveld
Martin Kropp, Janick Rüegger, Andreas Meier
Marijn Huizendveld

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Martin Kropp, Janick Rüegger, Andreas Meier
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09:00 - 10:30
Mi 9.1
Scenario Casting – Agility Starts in DDD's Problem Space!
Scenario Casting – Agility Starts in DDD's Problem Space!

This talk explains how Scenario Casting enables agile teams to pull together despite diverse ideas and concerns - in three iterative collaborative steps:
1. Find example scenarios of how ideas and concerns affect the domain - strictly in domain language! This provides an initial Scenario Backlog outlining the problem space.
2. Prioritize the Scenario Backlog and agree on scope.
3. Combine the top scenarios into coherent overarching Orientation Scenarios.

Let the agile teams focus on their parts of the Orientation Scenarios over the next iteration(s).

Target Audience: Stakeholders, Non-IT Domain Experts, BAs, Developers, Architects, QMs, Agilists
Prerequisites: Project experience, basic knowledge of DDD, basic knowledge of agile methods
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Scenario Casting is a collaborative planning and requirements engineering method that has emerged over the past four years in various Domain-Driven Design projects. It is used intensively with dozens of teams most of them involved in ambitious transformation projects.
Scenario Casting is especially helpful for getting a handle on complex or even overwhelming domains. If your domain feels like this and there are a lot of people involved too, you should give Scenario Casting a try.
Scenario Casting lays the groundwork for focused collaborative modeling sessions using domain storytelling or event storming. It ensures that all relevant points are addressed step by step. Also, it helps to quickly identify your domain's subdomains and determine the people who should be involved.

More relevant scenarios are discovered during collaborative modeling. They all go into the Scenario Backlog and will be considered in future Scenario Castings.
Unlike other concepts that try to scale agile, the Scenario Backlog is strictly limited to DDD's problem space, thus avoiding upfront design and premature planning.
Instead, Scenario Casting sets a common focus in problem space for agile teams by defining Orientation Scenarios. An Orientation Scenario illuminates parts of the problem space very precisely. It defines the actual results that solutions must deliver from a domain perspective - but without prescribing specific solutions. Finding and implementing good solutions remains the responsibility of the individual agile teams!

This talk contains examples from real projects and gives you best practices - so you get a good idea of how to try Scenario Casting yourself!

Jörn Koch is an agile and DDD coach and trainer. He worked many years as a developer and architect. Jörn loves ambitious projects in highly collaborative environments. He has practical experience as an agile coach for 15 years, and as a DDD coach for 6 years.

Jörn Koch
Jörn Koch
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 7.2
Climate Bookkeeping – Making a Big Impact with a Small Team
Climate Bookkeeping – Making a Big Impact with a Small Team

Over 95 % of companies in the EU are small businesses with less than 250 employees. Many of them would like to reduce their carbon emissions but very few have the knowledge and time needed to take action.
Reaching a sizable fraction of these companies with actionable information about their carbon footprint has a huge potential for climate impact. But is that possible for an organization with less than 10 employees? While also working at a sustainable pace?

Target Audience: Everybody willing to explore how to build software for our future
Prerequisites: Basic technical knowledge helps - there will be system design diagrams and tech buzzwords
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Fighting the climate crisis is urgent today and it will continue to be urgent for years and years to come. That means we must approach the fight at a sustainable pace to keep on working for a better future for a long time.

GoClimate is a company founded for the sole purpose of stopping climate change, but also with the ambition of creating a healthy organization with the resilience to withstand the challenges of today and tomorrow. But is it possible to have an impact on such a huge problem with a team of only 10 people and no overtime?

Using GoClimate’s endeavors to scale climate consciousness in small businesses as an example, we’ll explore the topic of working for sustainability in a sustainable way: the constraints, the workarounds, the dead ends and the liberation of rethinking what a company needs to be.

Since many years Pia Fåk Sunnanbo is a software engineer with experience from a wide range of languages, environments and domains. She loves deleting code and using the simplest tools possible. Fascinated how humans create technology and technology changes human behavior and lives. She holds a firm belief that software engineering knowledge is a huge power in today's society. It's our responsibility to use it for good. Works full time to stop climate change.

Pia Linnea Fåk Sunnanbo
Pia Linnea Fåk Sunnanbo
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14:30 - 15:30
Mi 8.3
Test-Driven Requirements Engineering: Agile Testing in Practice
Test-Driven Requirements Engineering: Agile Testing in Practice

Requirements engineering like testing require balance of value and risk. Agile requirements engineering and testing with test-driven requirements engineering (TDRE) balances project risks and cost. Clear advantage: Requirements are understandable, testable, and directly applicable as test case. Lead time and costs in testing are reduced by up to thirty percent.

This presentation at OOP 2023 will practically introduce to agile requirements engineering and test with TDRE. A case study demonstrates an industry use of TDRE.

Target Audience: Project Managers, Architects, Analysts, Requirements Engineers, Product Owners, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Requirements engineering like testing require balance. Balance is about balancing value and risk. Requirements must be good enough to mitigate risks but yet not overly specific to contain effort. Same for test, which though never complete needs to address those areas with highest risk.

Requirements engineering and testing belong together. Historically, testers have often only seen the requirements after the system has already been partially implemented. This had two serious disadvantages. On the one hand, insufficient requirements quality came far too late to the table. On the other hand, it was quite a lot of extra work without deriving suitable test cases in the context of requirements definition. A lot of additional work and long correction loops were the result.

Only an agile balance of risk-oriented coverage and testable requirements can improve test effectiveness. Such risk-oriented work also optimizes requirements engineering. Instead of paralysis by analysis in defining numerous requirements, test-driven requirements engineering (TDRE) focusses on specifying what is necessary and of high risk or high value.

TDRE is straight-forward: Test cases are developed in parallel to the requirements. Thus, the feasibility of the requirements is analyzed much faster than in the traditional sequential approach, in which tests are specified relatively late. The test cases are initially described in the same structure as the requirements and as a supplement to the respective requirements. This shifts Test-Driven Development (TDD), which has already proven itself as relevant agile methodology, to the specification level. Regression tests are attributed in order to prepare for later automation. The effort required for testing can be better estimated on this basis, and project and quality risks are thus reduced.
TDRE follows a triple peak model, which is connecting requirements (i.e., needs), design (i.e., solution) and test (i.e., the product).

It intertwines three perspectives:
•    Market perspective: “How can I meet customer satisfaction and needs?”
•    Design perspective: “How can I implement the solution to meet requirements?”
•    Testing perspective: “How can I find a defect and cause the product to fail?”

Here some guidance from our projects, which we will further illustrate in this presentation:
•    Every single functional requirement has at least one acceptance check, which is either fulfilled or not fulfilled and serves as the agile DoD (definition of done).
•    Each individual quality requirement is described with numerical values that can be measured.
•    Business rules are defined so that it can be determined whether they are true or false.
•    Business and data objects are defined with all their attributes, types and states so that they can be set and validated at test time.
•    System interfaces such as GUIs, reports and service interfaces are included in the requirements document so that values can be assigned to them.
•    All use cases have pre- and post-conditions that can be generated and validated.
•    All text is marked so that it can be automatically processed to generate test cases.

Agile requirements engineering and testing with test-driven requirements engineering (TDRE) balances project risks and cost. Clear advantage: Requirements are understandable, testable, and directly applicable as test case. Lead time and costs in testing are reduced by up to thirty percent. This presentation at OOP 2023 will practically introduce to agile requirements engineering and test with TDRE. A case study from medical cybersecurity demonstrates an industry use of TDRE.

Christof Ebert is managing director at Vector Consulting Services. He supports clients around the world in agile transformations. Before he had been working for ten years in global senior management positions. A trusted advisor and a member of several of industry boards, he is a professor at the University of Stuttgart and at Sorbonne in Paris. He authored several books including "Requirements Engineering" published by dPunkt and in China by Motor Press. He is serving on the editorial Boards of "IEEE Software" and "Journal of Systems and Software (JSS)".

Christof Ebert
Christof Ebert
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17:00 - 18:00
Mi 1.4
Initial Architecture Modeling: How Much is Too Much?
Initial Architecture Modeling: How Much is Too Much?

One of the fundamental strategies of Agile Modeling is that artifacts, including architecture models, should be just barely good enough (JBGE). Another way of saying this is your models should be sufficient for the task at hand, no more and no less. But sufficiency is contextual in nature, it depends.
In this session we will look at the issue of model sufficiency, exploring the risk factors that motivate us to model more as well as the conditions that enable us to model less.

Target Audience: Software Architects, Software Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of agile, understanding of software architecture
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
One of the fundamental strategies of Agile Modeling is that artifacts, including architecture models, should be just barely good enough (JBGE). Another way of saying this is your models should be sufficient for the task at hand, no more and no less. But sufficiency is contextual in nature, it depends.

In this session we will look at the issue of model sufficiency, exploring the risk factors that motivate us to model more as well as the conditions that enable us to model less. We model to think things through, to identify potential avenues for moving forward so that we can choose what we believe to be the most likely path for success. But the more effort we spend doing so potentially motivates us to make commitments earlier than we should and to lose time, and value, doing so. Balancing these tensions is how we determine model sufficiency in the context that we face. Proven agile architecture strategies that enable us to invest in less up-front modeling will also be explored. It's never just about modeling.

Agenda:
1. Architecture throughout the agile lifecycle.
2. What is initial architecture modeling?
3. What does it mean to be just barely good enough (JBGE)?
4. What risk factors motivate us to invest in more up-front modeling?
5. What factors enable us to invest in less up-front modeling?
6. What are the development practices that support an agile approach to architecture?

Scott Ambler is the Chief Methodologist of Ambysoft Inc. He is the creator of the Agile Modeling and Agile Data methods, as well as co-creator of PMI's Disciplined Agile tool kit. He has worked with organizations around the world to improve their software development ways of working (WoW). Scott is an award-winning author of 20+ books and an international keynote speaker.

Scott W. Ambler
Scott W. Ambler
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, (Donnerstag, 09.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Do 5.1
XP – 25 Years Later: Balancing New Tech and Proven Practices
XP – 25 Years Later: Balancing New Tech and Proven Practices

When Extreme Programming (XP) was first described 25 years ago the IT industry was in a different place. Since then, we've seen widespread adoption of agile approaches, the rise of the open source and public cloud ecosystems, and much more. And while these trends have improved our ability to deliver complex software systems, the mastery of the actual craft — working effectively in a team, delivering quality software at a sustainable pace — is as important as ever.

This talk will place XP into today's world of modern software development.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Erik Dörnenburg is a software engineer and passionate technologist. At Thoughtworks he helps clients solve their business challenges using modern technologies, platforms, and practices. On his long journey through the tech industry Erik encountered an abundance of new technologies, always seeking to understand their potential while at the same time bringing along proven engineering practices. Throughout his career Erik has been an advocate of agile values and open-source software.

Take it Back
Take it Back

Das agile Manifest wurde vor über 20 Jahren von Entwicklern für Entwickler geschrieben. Mittlerweile fühlt es sich aber immer mehr an, als ob die agile Bubble eine eigene Welt ist, die von Scrum Mastern und Agile Coaches übernommen wurde. Developer nehmen eher passiv an den vorgeschriebenen Meetings teil, statt den Prozess aktiv zu gestalten.
Was läuft da schief? Und wie können wir das ändern?
In dieser Session geht es um Motivation, sinnvolle Konflikte und Empowerment.

Zielpublikum: Architekt:innen, Entwickler:innen, Projektleiter:innen
Voraussetzungen: Projekterfahrung
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Ina Einemann ist als Agile Coach bei der Open Knowledge GmbH in Oldenburg tätig. Ihr Tätigkeitsumfeld umfasst neben ihrer Arbeit als Scrum Master auch Aufgaben aus dem Bereich PO und Requirements Engineering. Sie beschäftigt sich mit agilen Methoden und Vorgehensmodellen und berät Teams bei der Umsetzung agiler Praktiken. Sie ist außerdem einer der Hosts des Podcast "Mein Scrum ist kaputt".

Erik Dörnenburg
Ina Einemann
Ina Einemann
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