Konferenzprogramm

 

 

 

Das gesamte Konferenzprogramm auf einem Blick? Kein Problem, alle Programminhalte finden Sie hier jetzt auch als praktische PDF-Broschüre ganz bequem zum durchscrollen, downloaden oder ausdrucken:

Zur PDF-Broschüre

 

 

Thema: Technical Debt

Nach Tracks filtern
Nach Themen filtern
Alle ausklappen
  • Montag
    06.02.
  • Dienstag
    07.02.
  • Mittwoch
    08.02.
  • Donnerstag
    09.02.
, (Montag, 06.Februar 2023)
14:00 - 17:00
Mo 12
Limitiert Approval Testing: Get Legacy Code Under Control
Approval Testing: Get Legacy Code Under Control

Approval testing is a technique that helps you to get a difficult codebase under test and begin to control your technical debt. Approval testing works best on larger pieces of code where you want to test for multiple things and interpreting failures is challenging.

In this hands-on session we'll introduce a commonly-used Approval testing tool for Java and through hands-on exercises learn to get control of some example code. The same tool is also available for many other programming languages, see https://approvaltests.com/

Bring a laptop.
Max. number of participants: 30

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of Java and unit testing, bring a laptop
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:

Introducing Approval Testing (55 minutes)

  • Code Review: examine existing test case, discuss strengths & weaknesses
  • Demonstration: Convert an assertion-based test to use Approval testing
  • Hands-on exercise: Add some tests using Approvals.Java.

Break (5 minutes)

Approval Test Design (50 minutes)

  • Presentation: Approval testing characteristics and design patterns
  • Exercise: Using the default XML printer with Approvals.Java
  • Demonstration: Using scrubbing with an XML printer
  • Discussion: when to print, when to scrub

Printer Design (30 minutes)

  • Exercise: Designing a printer for a domain object
  • Presentation: Case studies
  • Q&A (10 minutes)

Emily Bache is a Technical Coach with ProAgile. She has worked with software development for over 20 years in diverse organizations from start-up to large enterprise. These days Emily specializes in coaching development teams in agile practices like Test-Driven Development, refactoring and agile design. Emily has written two books, authored Pluralsight courses and regularly speaks at software conferences. Originally from the UK, she currently lives in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Twitter: https://twitter.com/emilybache
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emilybache/
Github: https://github.com/emilybache
Website: https://sammancoaching.org/

Emily Bache
Emily Bache
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Dienstag, 07.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Di 3.1
Technical Coaching with the Samman Method
Technical Coaching with the Samman Method

For a technology company, building a strong engineering culture is essential for long-term success. Today's software industry is growing so fast that a large proportion of developers will inevitably have less than 5 years experience. At the same time, many software systems contain code that is ten, twenty or even thirty years old.

It's a constant challenge to communicate a healthy culture to newcomers and prevent technical debt from getting out of control. Technical coaching is all about tackling those issues: culture and skills.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
The Samman method is a concrete coaching method for spreading skills and culture within an engineering organization. There are two main parts to the method:
- Learning Hour
- Ensemble working

In the learning hour the coach uses exercises and active learning techniques to teach the theory and practice of skills like Test-Driven Development and Refactoring. In two-hour Ensemble sessions the whole team collaborates together with the coach in applying agile development techniques in their usual production codebase.

In combination with strong technical leadership, the Samman method can enable the spread of skills and culture to bring a healthy engineering organization to the next level.

Emily Bache is a Technical Coach with ProAgile. She has worked with software development for over 20 years in diverse organizations from start-up to large enterprise. These days Emily specializes in coaching development teams in agile practices like Test-Driven Development, refactoring and agile design. Emily has written two books, authored Pluralsight courses and regularly speaks at software conferences. Originally from the UK, she currently lives in Gothenburg, Sweden.
Twitter: https://twitter.com/emilybache
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/emilybache/
Github: https://github.com/emilybache
Website: https://sammancoaching.org/

Micro-Learning-Cycles (MLCs) – Lernen ohne Zeit
Micro-Learning-Cycles (MLCs) – Lernen ohne Zeit

"Ich hatte keine Zeit, den Zaun zu flicken" - Dieses Zitat kennt wohl jeder, und doch ertappen wir uns selbst, unseren Zaun nicht geflickt, sondern stattdessen die Hühner gesucht zu haben.
Doch wie ändere ich das?
Dieser Vortrag zeigt mit dem Konzept der MLCs ein Tool auf, dieser Falle zu begegnen und sich selbst und andere in den Modus des kontinuierlichen Lernens zu versetzen.
Am Ende haben die Zuhörenden einen ersten MLC durchlaufen und ein Tool erlernt, um sich und anderen den Freiraum zum Lernen zu erschaffen.

Zielpublikum: Coaches, Entscheider, Projektleiter:innen, Transformation Manager, Architekt:innen, Lebenslange Lernende
Voraussetzungen: Keine
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Extended Abstract:
Micro-Learning-Cycles sind kein theoretisches Konstrukt, sie sind tatsächlich aus der Notwendigkeit entstanden, trotz vollem Terminkalender Zeit zum Lernen zu finden.
Neben der Vermittlung und Anwendung von MLC zeigt die Referentin auch aus der Praxis, wo sie MLCs einsetzte, was funktionierte und wo auch Limitierungen sind.

Ihr Motto „You go first! – Nimm dein Leben in die Hand!", steht für ihr Tun: Rein in den nachhaltigen Erfolg durch Eigenverantwortung und Selbstführung.
Anne Hoffmann unterstützt Menschen und Organisationen dabei, erfolgreich ihre Ziele zu erreichen. Als Expertin für Selbstführung und mit ihrem Motto „You go first!“ erinnert sie daran, dass nachhaltiger Erfolg durch hohe Eigenverantwortung insbesondere dann entsteht, wenn diese Selbstführung vorgelebt wird.
Anne benutzt oft Spiele, um Erkenntnisse weiterzugeben.

Emily Bache
Anne Hoffmann
Anne Hoffmann
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Mittwoch, 08.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Mi 3.1
Beyond Taming Technical Debt
Beyond Taming Technical Debt

Discipline, determination, a highly visible area, and a few sticky notes, are all you need to move beyond problems with technical debt.

Target Audience: Developers, Project Leader, Designers, Product Owners, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Basic Knowledge of Software Development Process
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
## Making great software is challenging
It doesn't matter how qualified a team is, it will never be able to produce perfect, flawless, entirely bug-free software.
While teams are discovering how to build the right software in the right way, the environment the team operates in changes.
This results in a constant reorientation of the product, and the corresponding software solution, which will cause gaps between how things work, and how they should work.
Unfortunately, the market won't wait infinitely until teams have addressed these issues in the software, and organizations tend to run out of patience too.
That is why teams often have to move forward with designs and code that are ... let's call them sub-optimal.
These gaps, they are technical debt: a loan against the future, where things will be fixed, at some point ... Hopefully.
According to a global survey performed by Stripe, Inc. amongst software engineers in 2018, researchers found that **engineers estimate to spend 17,3 hours per week on addressing technical debt**.
That same research established that developers work about 41.1 hours per week. With that in mind, addressing technical debt constitutes well over a third of the time a typical engineer spends per week.
**If engineers are spending that much time, how could they better utilize their attention?**
Why do they seem unable to gain control over this metric and push it downwards?
While technical debt sounds nice and predictable: "you just have to pay interest", it really is like a loan with a mobster, and not with a bank.
It will show up unannounced at your doorstep at 3.30 in the morning, demanding that you pay up now!
How can you prevent being surprised by this goon?! And what can you do to leverage the benefits of borrowing against the future?
Because when the conditions are right, taking out a loan and paying it back Tomorrow might just help you ship a better product today.

## Imagine...
- A lightweight process to discover technical debt without a big investment up front
- A data-driven approach to identify the technical debt that needs attention right now
- A system that is easy to introduce, and simple to enforce
- Something that will guide engineers to articulate technical debt in terms of our roadmap
- Which will ultimately improve the flow of work in your organization

## The Wall of Technical Debt™️
A few years ago [Mathias Verraes coined the term "_The Wall of Technical Debt_"][1]. During this presentation Marijn Huizendveld will show you how to institute such a process for managed technical debt. Doing so will provide you with a safety net that allows you to make "naive" design choices every now and again to ship your ideas as fast as possible, without sacrificing sustainable delivery in the long run.
[1]: verraes.net/2020/01/wall-of-technical-debt/

Marijn Huizendveld – In a small backstreet of Tokyo lives a man named Aki, a 78 years old former chef. Aki spent most of his life trying to perfectly cook the rice he buys from his friend Mato. He's been at it for 57 years now, and still searches for ways to improve his cooking methods. There is probably not too much anybody else could tell Aki about cooking this specific type of rice. When it comes to his process, Aki's understanding is unrivaled.
After years of trial and error, Marijn Huizendveld could be called the Aki of Domain-Driven Design, due to his extensive background in both programming and strategy. He uses this experience to show teams and organizations how to recognize and act on problems and opportunities in an autonomous, self-learning fashion.

Maintenance and Evolution of Large Scale Software Systems – Business, Dev & Ops Challenges
Maintenance and Evolution of Large Scale Software Systems – Business, Dev & Ops Challenges

Even in the time of agile software development and devOps, maintenance and evolution of large-scale software systems remain challenging. This is not only caused by technical debt, but is heavily caused by lost knowledge, high complexity of micro-service architectures, difficult requirements management, not available documentation, and the complexity of communication among and coordination of the many stakeholders. In our session we will talk about the challenges we identified in our study and present new approaches to address these challenges.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Project Management Experience, Software Maintenance
Level: Expert

Martin Kropp is professor for Software Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland. His interest is in everything that makes software development more efficient, build automation, testing, refactoring and development methodologies.

As a software engineer, Janick Rüegger worked in different teams from web development to platform engineering. In his master’s degree, he focuses on the challenges of large-scale software development.

Marijn Huizendveld
Martin Kropp, Janick Rüegger, Andreas Meier
Marijn Huizendveld

Vortrag Teilen

Martin Kropp, Janick Rüegger, Andreas Meier
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

11:00 - 11:45
Mi 3.2
Raus aus der Wartungshölle ... zumindest ein bisschen
Raus aus der Wartungshölle ... zumindest ein bisschen

Irgendwann trifft es mal jeden. Anwendungen veralten automatisch, egal, ob ein oder zehn Jahre alt, ob sie "fertig" entwickelt sind oder nicht. Die Gründe sind vielschichtig: Die Programmiersprache entwickelt sich weiter, Bibliotheken brauchen ein Update, Good Practices entwickeln sich weiter. Diese Wartungsarbeiten werden nicht gerne gemacht, da sie scheinbar unnötige Aufwände erzeugen und zum Teil recht stupide sind. Ignoriert die Entwicklerin sie, dann sammelt sie automatisch technische Schulden und die Aufwände sind in der Zukunft höher.

Zielpublikum: Entwickler:innen, Architekt:innen, Entscheider
Voraussetzungen: Allgemeine Entwicklungskenntnisse
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Extended Abstract:
Irgendwann trifft es mal jeden. Anwendungen veralten automatisch, egal, ob ein oder zehn Jahre alt, ob sie "fertig" entwickelt sind oder nicht. Die Gründe sind vielschichtig: Die Programmiersprache entwickelt sich weiter, Bibliotheken brauchen ein Update, Good Practices entwickeln sich weiter. Diese Wartungsarbeiten werden nicht gerne gemacht, da sie scheinbar unnötige Aufwände erzeugen und zum Teil recht stupide sind. Ignoriert die Entwicklerin sie, dann sammelt sie automatisch technische Schulden und die Aufwände sind in der Zukunft höher und bei Sicherheitslücken schmerzhafter.

Dieser Vortrag zeigt, was alles unter Wartungsarbeiten zu verstehen ist und in welche Probleme Unternehmen laufen können, wenn sie es unterlassen. Außerdem stellt es Vorgehensweise und Werkzeuge vor, die bei Wartungsarbeiten helfen können und somit zumindest den stupiden Teil reduzieren.

Sandra Parsick ist Java Champion und arbeitet als freiberufliche Software-Entwicklerin und Consultant im Java-Umfeld. Seit 2008 beschäftigt sie sich mit agiler Softwareentwicklung in verschiedenen Rollen. Ihre Schwerpunkte liegen im Bereich der Java Enterprise-Anwendungen, Cloud, Software Craftsmanship und in der Automatisierung von Softwareentwicklungsprozessen. Darüber schreibt sie gerne Artikel und spricht auf Konferenzen. In ihrer Freizeit engagiert sich Sandra Parsick in verschiedenen Programmkomitees und Community-Gruppen.

Sandra Parsick
Sandra Parsick
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

14:30 - 15:30
Mi 4.3
Technische Schulden dem Management erklären
Technische Schulden dem Management erklären

Wir entwickeln heute Software nicht mehr auf der grünen Wiese, sondern wir erweitern und verändern vorhandene Systeme. Dabei wird der Code immer komplexer und sammelt technische Schulden an. Im Entwicklungsteam ist uns das allen klar, aber wie erklären wir dem Management, dass es sinnvoll ist, frühzeitig technische Schulden abzubauen?

In diesem Vortrag berichte ich von meiner Erfahrung aus verschiedensten Kontexten und gebe Empfehlungen, wie die Kommunikationsbarriere zwischen Management und Entwicklungsteams übersprungen werden kann.

Zielpublikum: Architekt:innen, Entwickler:innen, Product Owner, Projektleiter:innen, IT-Management
Voraussetzungen: Projekterfahrung
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Dr. Carola Lilienthal ist Software-Architektin und Geschäftsführerin bei der Workplace Solutions GmbH. Seit 2003 analysiert sie die Zukunftsfähigkeit von Softwarearchitekturen und spricht auf Konferenzen über dieses Thema. 2015 hat sie ihre Erfahrungen in dem Buch „Langlebige Softwarearchitekturen“ zusammengefasst.

Carola Lilienthal
Carola Lilienthal
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Donnerstag, 09.Februar 2023)
09:00 - 10:45
Do 8.1
Evolutionäre Softwarequalität
Evolutionäre Softwarequalität

Qualitätsziele helfen uns, Architekturentscheidungen fundierter zu treffen. Die genau richtige Qualität ist jedoch oft subjektiv und ändert sich über die Zeit hinweg. Dies macht das Arbeiten mit und an Qualitätszielen vor allem bei langlebigen Softwaresystemen spannend.

In diesem Vortrag stelle ich eine neue Sicht auf Softwarequalität vor, bei der wir Qualität im evolutionären Kontext betrachten. Als Basis verwende ich das ISO 25010-Qualitätsmodell sowie Wardley Mapping, um die passende Qualität nach Wichtigkeit und Evolutionsstufen zu finden.

Zielpublikum: Software-Architekt:innen, Entwickler:innen
Voraussetzungen: Erfahrung mit optimierungsbedürftigen Softwaresystemen
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Extended Abstract:
Die Balance der passenden Qualitätszielen ist ein herausforderndes Thema. Qualitätsziele sind aber sehr wichtig in der Entwicklung passender Softwaresysteme. Sie helfen uns, Architekturentscheidungen fundierter zu treffen. Die „genau richtige Qualität“ hängt dabei stark vom Betrachtungspunkt verschiedener Stakeholder ab. Zudem ändern sich Ansprüche an die Qualitäten eines Softwaresystems über die Zeit hinweg. Dies macht das Arbeiten mit und an Qualitätszielen vor allem in langlebigen Softwaresystemen immer wieder spannend.

In diesem Vortrag stelle ich eine neue Sicht auf Softwarequalität vor, wo wir Qualität im evolutionären Kontext betrachten. Als Basis verwende ich hierzu das ISO 25010-Qualitätsmodell sowie Wardley Mapping. Damit lassen sich notwendige Qualitäten nach ihrer Wichtigkeit und Evolutionsstufen von Softwaresystemen kommunizieren. Der Vortrag verzahnt die evolutionäre Sicht auf Softwarequalität mit Beispielen aus der Praxis und zeigt, wie sich damit die richtige Balance zwischen zu viel und zu wenig Qualität gestalten lässt.

Markus Harrer arbeitet seit mehreren Jahren in der Softwareentwicklung und ist vor allem in konservativen Branchen tätig. Als Senior Consultant hilft er, Software nachhaltig und wirtschaftlich sinnvoll zu entwickeln und zu verbessern. Er ist aktiver Mitgestalter in Communities zu den Themen Software Analytics, Softwarearchitektur, Softwaresanierung und Java. Zudem ist er akkreditierter Trainer für den iSAQB Foundation Level und dem Advanced-Level-Modul IMPROVE.

Technische Schulden – warum der Begriff mehr Verwirrung als Klarheit stiftet. Und wie es besser geht
Technische Schulden – warum der Begriff mehr Verwirrung als Klarheit stiftet. Und wie es besser geht

Ist uns Softwerkern wirklich klar, was wir meinen, wenn wir von Technischen Schulden sprechen? “Klar”, ist die Antwort. Wirklich? Warum haben wir dann Schwierigkeiten, POs/Projektleiter/Abteilungsleiter vom notwendigen Budget zu überzeugen?
Im Vortrag zeigen wir, wie es datenbasiert besser geht. Wie man für Technische Schulden KPIs erfasst und wie man jeweils Code-, Architektur-, Test-Qualität, Team-Kollaboration mit den KPIs korreliert, um eine Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse durchzuführen. Trotz Microservices und DevOps - die Herausforderungen bleiben.

Zielpublikum: Architekt:innen, Projekt-/Technische Leiter:innen, Key Developer, Manager, Entscheider
Voraussetzungen: Keine
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Fortgeschritten

Extended Abstract:
Ist uns Softwerkern wirklich klar, was wir meinen, wenn wir von Technischen Schulden sprechen? “Klar”, ist die Antwort, “es geht um Smells, Bugs, Bedarf an Refactoring, fehlende Tests …”. Zum Teil können wir deren Umfang und Bedarf sogar messen. Aber wie entscheiden wir, was wir zuerst angehen sollen? Wie und was messen wir, sodass andere Stakeholder uns überhaupt verstehen und wir POs, Projektleiter und Abteilungsleiter vom notwendigen Budget überzeugen können?
Im Vortrag zeigen wir, wie man datenbasiert bessere Antworten findet. Was man mit den Folgen der Technischen Schulden anfängt, Wartungs- und sich verstärkende Mehraufwände in der Entwicklung als KPIs erfasst und deren Hotspots im Code identifiziert. Wie man jeweils Code-, Architektur- und Test-Qualität usw. als Ursachen identifiziert und mit den KPIs korreliert. Und wie man Technische Schulden in der Architektur in Zahlen prognostiziert, um eine Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse durchführen zu können. Und wie sich Team-Kollaboration auch auf Technische Schulden auswirkt.
Diese Herausforderungen sind seit mehreren Jahrzehnten die gleichen. Daran haben auch Microservices nichts geändert.

Die Teilnehmer erhalten Antworten auf folgende Fragen:

•    Was sind Technische Schulden genauer?
•    Wie misst man die Folgen?
•    Wie sieht eine effektive Ursachenanalyse aus?
•    Wie überzeuge ich andere Stakeholder von der Notwendigkeit?
•    Wie wirkt sich Team-Kollaboration auf Technische Schulden aus?

Egon Wuchner hat mehr als 18 Jahre bei der Siemens Corporate Technology als Software-Engineer, Architekt und Projektleiter zu Software-Architektur-Themen wie Qualitätsattribute und Software-Wartbarkeit gearbeitet.
Konstantin Sokolov hat teilweise für Siemens als Freelancer an den Themen mit Egon zusammengearbeitet. Zusammen haben sie Cape of Good Code gegründet mit dem Ziel, Software-Analysen anzubieten, auf die es ankommt.
Markus Harrer
Egon Wuchner, Konstantin Sokolov
Egon Wuchner, Konstantin Sokolov
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

11:00 - 11:45
Do 5.2
You Don't Have to be a Conductor, to Make a Perfect Symphony Between Hype Driven and Legacy Development
You Don't Have to be a Conductor, to Make a Perfect Symphony Between Hype Driven and Legacy Development

You know the story, one dev in the team found out about this amazing new framework which will solve potentially aaaall your problems; but the product owner stops him right away. There is definitely no time until the next roadmap milestone is reached and you’re already late. We have introduced the tool Tech Radar – in two different organisational setups – to make technology strategy explicit.

In this talk I’ll share our learnings on how we made sure our teams don’t drown in legacy, train them on time for new tech and foster exchange across teams.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Team Lead
Prerequisites: Everyone interested in technology strategy
Level: Basic

Marita Klein works as Senior Cloud Architect at Bosch Engineering. She has worked in different domains and roles during her professional career: Frontend and Backend developer, Architect as well as team lead of a group of software engineers. In all these stations she has experienced the importance of technical exchange between experts and how making problems explicit and talking about them is the first step of a solution.

Marita Klein
Marita Klein
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

Zurück