Conference Program

Please note:
On this site, there is only displayed the English speaking sessions of the OOP 2022 Digital. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2022 Digital correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "EVENT MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

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  • Montag
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    04.02.
, (Montag, 31.Januar 2022)
10:00 - 17:00
Mo 3
Limitiert Scrum Patterns: Understanding Scrum In-Depth and Accelerating your Team
Scrum Patterns: Understanding Scrum In-Depth and Accelerating your Team

The Scrum Guide lays out the rules of the game called Scrum. Beyond it, there are known "secrets" necessary to making Scrum work—but most teams never get to them.

Scrum experts have been working for years to collect and write these nuggets down as patterns. The seminar is based on the book "A Scrum Book" — a de facto standard for Scrum, and a definitive exposition of the why behind everything Scrum. You'll learn about Scrum at a deeper level than you probably reached during your CSM, PSM, or CSPO training — focusing on your team's special needs.

Maximum number of participants: 30

Target Audience: Scrum team members (all Scrum roles); managers and other players in organizations using Scrum
Prerequisites: Basic Scrum familiarity (any Scrum certification, or membership on a practicing Scrum team)
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
When you have a new child in your family, there are a lot of things you need to know that aren't in the owner's manual. What? You didn't get an owner's manual with your child? Even Scrum has an "owner's manual" called The Scrum Guide — but all it does is to provide a dry, formal description of the boundaries of Scrum. Yet there are known "secrets" to making Scrum work, but, unfortunately, some teams never get to them.

Scrum community experts have been collecting these secrets for years, and working together to write them down as patterns. The seminar is based on the book "A Scrum Book" — a de facto standard for what Scrum means, and a definitive exposition of the why behind everything Scrum. Even the inventor of Scrum, Jeff Sutherland, now uses them as a central part of his training and of describing Scrum. And now they’re freely available to you. Come and learn how to use them and what they mean to your organization, and how you can use them to chart a powerful new direction of kaizen for your Scrum team! You'll learn things about Scrum at a deeper level than you probably reached during your CSM, PSM, or CSPO training — and the seminar is focused on your team's special needs.

There will be exercises to develop pattern sequences from the pattern language, and to identify solutions to your own impediments using patterns. The session culminates with an exercise where you assess your own Scrum team and develop a concrete action plan to remedy the gaps between your current practice and those parts of Scrum that will move you forward. In the end, the goal is to move beyond Scrum — and this session lays the foundations for you eventually to do that.

We encourage you to attend as Scrum team, perhaps using this event as a retrospective!

Jim Coplien is an old programming language shark who now does world-wide consulting on Agile software development methods and architecture. He is one of the founders of the software pattern discipline, and his organizational patterns work is one of the foundations of both Scrum and XP. He has written several books on programming, software design, and organizational design. He currently works for Gertrud & Cope in Denmark. When he grows up he wants to be an anthropologist.
James O. Coplien
James O. Coplien
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10:00 - 17:00
Mo 4
Modern C++ Design for Safe and Embedded Systems
Modern C++ Design for Safe and Embedded Systems

This tutorial will demystify some of C++ complexities by showing clear guidelines to simpler use of specific language features for designing functions and types of your system. From the experience in specifying new MISRA C++ guidelines the author will show how to write safer C++ for embedded and other systems.

Learning goals consist of

  • designing function interfaces: parameter passing styles and error reporting
  • employ strong typing for better domain values
  • conscious class design for resource management and hierarchies

Target Audience: Developers
Prerequisites: Practical knowledge of C++
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
This tutorial is trying to simplify your use of C++. We have many great rule sets to chose from, some partially outdated, like Scott Meyers 3rd edition, some futuristic, like the C++ core guidelines. While working on the AUTOSAR C++ and new MISRA C++ guidelines I found that many of the guidelines forbid things without giving actual guideline on how to do things and when to deviate.

Also many talks (mine included) on C++ explain the modern features and show how they work, but only few put things into context and show what to give up and how things combine sanely.

This full day tutorial is the result of thinking about that. It won’t show C++20 feature by feature, but gives a coherent set of practices to improve your design and code using existing standard C++ features where they give you benefits.

We will cover the following topics:

  • designing function interfaces in a way that they are easy to call correctly and hard to call incorrectly
  • how to report function contract violations (at least 5 different ones) and their individual benefits and liabilities, so you can make a conscious choice.
  • what parameter passing style and return value style works best under what conditions
  • how to create (parameter) type wrappers to avoid passing wrong arguments
  • class design for simple value wrappers to improve function interfaces
  • mix-in strategies for functionality and operators, so that creating value wrappers is simpler
  • provide an overview of class styles, e.g., value, manager, oo-bases and show how to select from the rules for special member functions
  • take a look at the lesser known C++11 feature of ref-qualified member functions and show why and when to use them for your member functions

If you are brave enough, bring your own examples that we can look at and discuss where they are perfect and where they could be improved.

Peter Sommerlad is a consultant and trainer for C++ and agile software development. He was professor and lead the Institute for Software at HSR Rapperswil. Peter is co-author of the books POSA Vol. 1 and Security Patterns and contributed to "97 things every programmer should know". Peter is an ACM Senior Member and member of ACCU, IEEE CS, and the ISO WG21( C++ ) and WG23 (vulnerabilities) committees. Peter participated in the creation of MISRA C++202x.
Peter Sommerlad
Peter Sommerlad
Vortrag: Mo 4
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10:00 - 17:00
Mo 7
Rust Fundamentals Workshop
Rust Fundamentals Workshop

This training has been designed for developers who want to start working with Rust professionally and already have a solid background in programming from other C-like languages like Java, C++, C#, or JavaScript/TypeScript. It is not specialized on a specific field of use but should rather equip attendees with fundamental knowledge to successfully get started with Rust.

Target audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: Solid background in programming from other C-like languages
Level: Practicing

Extended Abstract
Rust has recently gained significant popularity. It has been achieving top rankings in the Most Loved Language-category of the Stack Overflow developer survey for many years in a row. The reasons for Rust’s success are manifold. The language is statically typed but with zero-cost abstractions, it eliminates entire classes of bugs because of its memory safeness, it generates blazingly fast code, you can build a wide variety of application types ranging from embedded systems for IoT devices to RESTful web APIs in the cloud, etc.

This training has been designed for developers who want to start working with Rust professionally and already have a solid background in programming from other C-like languages like Java, C++, C#, or JavaScript/TypeScript. It is not specialized on a specific field of use but should rather equip attendees with fundamental knowledge to successfully get started with Rust.

Rainer Stropek is co-founder and CEO of the company software architects and has been serving this role since 2008. At software architects, Rainer and his team are developing the award-winning SaaS time tracking solution time cockpit. Previously, Rainer founded and led two IT consulting firms that worked in the area of developing software solution based on the Microsoft technology stack.
Rainer is recognized as an expert concerning software development, software architecture, and cloud computing. He has written numerous books and articles on programming languages, database development, cloud computing, and web development. Additionally, he regularly speaks at conferences, workshops and trainings in Europe and the US. In 2010 Rainer has become one of the first MVPs for the Microsoft Azure cloud computing platform. In 2015, Rainer also became a Microsoft Regional Director. 2016, Rainer additionally received the MVP award for Visual Studio and Developer Technologies.
Rainer graduated the Higher Technical School Leonding (AT) for MIS with honors and holds a BSc (Hons) Computer Studies of the University of Derby (UK).
Rainer Stropek
Rainer Stropek
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10:00 - 13:00
Mo 10
Limitiert Timing in Testing
Timing in Testing

Today we must deal with shorter time-to-market, increasing complexity and more agility while keeping quality and other key system properties high.

To address these challenges the right timing in testing is critical but often not explicitly tackled. Therefore, in this interactive tutorial we reflect on our current approach on timing in testing, investigate and discuss needed strategies, tactics, and practices in different areas, and share experiences and lessons learned to improve timing in testing – because it is time to act now!

Maximum number of participants: 50

Target Audience: Test Architects, Test Engineers, Product Owners, Quality Managers, Software Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge about testing and quality engineering
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Today we must deal with shorter time-to-market, increasing complexity and more agility while keeping quality and other key system properties high. Our test systems increase in size, volume, flexibility, velocity, complexity, and unpredictability. Additionally, digitalization requires more than just a face lift in testing.

To address these challenges the right timing in testing (“when to do what kind of testing and how?”) is critical, but often not explicitly tackled. Therefore, in this interactive tutorial we reflect on our current approach on timing in testing, investigate and discuss needed strategies, tactics, and practices in different areas, and share experiences and lessons learned to improve timing in testing – because it is time to act now!

Some of the areas in testing that are covered in the tutorial are:

  • When to do what kind of testing in the lifecycle – agile, lean, DevOps, and beyond
  • Testing too early vs. too late – risks and opportunities
  • Test automation and the test pyramid – shift-left, shift-right
  • When to stop testing – test exit criteria
  • Repetition in testing – regression testing
Peter Zimmerer is a Principal Key Expert Engineer at Siemens AG, Technology, in Munich, Germany. For more than 30 years he has been working in the field of software testing and quality engineering. He performs consulting, coaching, and training on test management and test engineering practices in real-world projects and drives research and innovation in this area. As ISTQB® Certified Tester Full Advanced Level he is a member of the German Testing Board (GTB). Peter has authored several journal and conference contributions and is a frequent speaker at international conferences.
Peter Zimmerer
Peter Zimmerer
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10:00 - 13:00
Mo 12
Agile Requirements Engineering - Best Practices
Agile Requirements Engineering - Best Practices

This tutorial introduces to agile requirements engineering. The half day delivers practical guidance from our projects across different industries. While being based on the IREB agile RE primer curriculum, it has more practical focus and avoids agile basics and theory. Yet, participants are eligible to IREB certification. We give practical tips for designing agile requirements processes. Attendees will learn how to combine needs of systematic requirements engineering with agile principles. Special focus is given to connect RE with agile project management and with testing. A hands-on case study shows practical usage of agile RE.

Target Audience: Project Managers, Architects, Analysts, Requirements Engineers, Product Owners, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Agile projects need agile requirements engineering. Innovations in increasingly complex systems under cost pressure and in global competition demand for continuous alignment towards value and costs. The key to value delivery is requirements. They are no longer "collected" but must be developed in a targeted manner with suitable interest groups. Requirements are not frozen at an early stage but must be flexibly addressed throughout the project and product. However, agile requirements engineering is difficult to implement, especially in critical systems because of complex dependencies, growing quality requirements and diverse coordination processes.

Agile requirements engineering is not just a trivial priority setting. Leaving our some requirements when time and budget are scarce does not work in critical systems. Design thinking and team-based decision-making are nice for small applications, but hardly scale in larger industrial projects. Describing requirements vaguely and hoping that they become clear in the course of the project has already ruined many projects. Agile requirements engineering in critical and compliant context must combine the needs of classic requirements engineering with the flexibility of agile action.

This tutorial introduces to agile requirements engineering. It offers many practical examples from our industry projects when introducing agility. The training considers the IREB agile RE primer curriculum, however with more practical focus from many agile projects across industries. Participants are eligible to IREB certification. We give practical tips for designing agile requirements processes.

This begins with a value-oriented elaboration of the actual need. Then we look at techniques like Kano model, planning poker, design thinking, Kanban etc. In an industry case study, we present experiences and benefits of agile requirements engineering in a medical technology project with Siemens Healthineers. In particular, we use concrete examples and industry experience to show how agile requirements engineering is implemented in practice. This allowed us to reduce the costs for reworking by about 30%. The experience gained can be transferred to other projects and environments.

As a product manager or project manager, you will learn how to merge systematic requirements engineering with agile principles. As a successful requirements engineer or system analyst, you will learn how to use and scale agile techniques for requirements engineering.

Christof Ebert is managing director at Vector Consulting Services. He supports clients around the world in agile transformations. Before he had been working for ten years in global senior management positions. A trusted advisor and a member of several of industry boards, he is a professor at the University of Stuttgart and at Sorbonne in Paris. He authored several books including "Requirements Engineering" published by dPunkt and in China by Motor Press. He is serving on the editorial Boards of "IEEE Software" and "Journal of Systems and Software (JSS)".
Christof Ebert
Christof Ebert
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10:00 - 13:00
Mo 13
Introduction to Functional Programming
Introduction to Functional Programming

Functional programming is the future of software development. As software gets ever more complex, unintended side effects flourish - you push on one side, and something unexpected squirts out the other. Functional programming cuts down on complexity through high-level abstractions and avoids unintended side effects through pure functions. The result is simple and elegant code that captures the essence of the problem you're trying to solve. Fortunately, functional programming is easy to learn, and this tutorial will get you started.

Target audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: none
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract
Functional programming is the logical continuation of object-oriented programming: OOP managed to encapsulate mutable state with the goal of ultimately eliminating it one day, and functional programming finally realizes that vision. Language implementations have been mature and robust for many years now, and the practical functional languages - Haskell, OCaml, Scala, Clojure, F#, Racket, Erlang, Elixir, Swift - all have thriving communities and ecosystems. Moreover, decades of experience and research teaching functional programming have produced effective didactic approaches that enable anyone into programming to easily get into FP. The time to get started is now!

Michael Sperber is CEO of Active Group in Tübingen, Germany. Mike specializes in functional programming and has been an internationally recognized expert in the field: He has spoken at the top conferences in programming languages, authored many papers on the subject as well as several books. Moreover, he is an expert on teaching programming.
Michael Sperber
Michael Sperber
Vortrag: Mo 13
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 14
Limitiert Security Games – Playfully Improve your Security
Security Games – Playfully Improve your Security

Security is an important topic, especially when developing software. But it is seen as complex and is holding everyone back, often put off until the end and delegated to an external person or group.

To be effective security needs to be a continuous part of the development process and to involve the whole team.

Security games can help to achieve this. They involve the whole team and facilitate the learning and application of security principles. They offer a way to integrate expert knowledge and make security less scary, maybe even fun.

Maximum number of participants: 50

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leaders, Testers, Security Experts
Prerequisites: General interest in security, basic development experience
Level: Basic

Claudius Link is working in IT since 1994 in roles from system and network administration, support, software development, development manager to information security officer.
During this time he worked in different domains. Ranging from medical devices and laboratory systems, numerical simulations, transportation, financial industry, through security software and as information security officer for a medium sized subsidiary of a global enterprise.
Currently he is self-employed, promoting human centred security.
Matthias Altmann is a software developer and IT security expert at Micromata GmbH, where he and his colleagues oversee and develop the IT security area. He is also co-founder and organizer of the IT Security Meetup Kassel, a network of IT security enthusiasts dedicated to professional exchange on the topic. More information on his blog: https://secf00tprint.github.io/blog
Claudius Link, Matthias Altmann
Claudius Link, Matthias Altmann
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 16
From Requirements to Outcomes: Value Modeling, Experimentation and AI/ML
From Requirements to Outcomes: Value Modeling, Experimentation and AI/ML

Traditionally, requirements were used as a means to communicate between customers and development organizations. Unfortunately, requirements suffer from many limitations.

An alternative approach is to focus on outcomes and to use value modeling as a mechanism to quantitatively define the desired outcomes. This value model can then be used for experimentation by humans using DevOps and A/B testing or using machine learning models for automated experimentation.

The tutorial provides introduction of the topics and exercises.

Target Audience: Architects, Product Managers, Senior Developers, Business Leaders
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Jan Bosch is professor at Chalmers University Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden and director of the Software Center (www.software-center.se), a strategic partner-funded collaboration between 17 large European companies (including Ericsson, Volvo Cars, Volvo Trucks, Saab Defense, Scania, Siemens and Bosch) and five universities focused on digitalization. Earlier, he worked as Vice President Engineering Process at Intuit Inc where he also led Intuit's Open Innovation efforts and headed the central mobile technologies team. Before Intuit, he was head of the Software and Application Technologies Laboratory at Nokia Research Center, Finland. Prior to joining Nokia, he headed the software engineering research group at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. He received a MSc degree from the University of Twente, The Netherlands, and a PhD degree from Lund University, Sweden. His research activities include digitalisation, evidence-based development, business ecosystems, artificial intelligence and machine/deep learning, software architecture, software product families and software variability management. He is the author of several books including "Design and Use of Software Architectures: Adopting and Evolving a Product Line Approach" published by Pearson Education (Addison-Wesley & ACM Press) and “Speed, Data and Ecosystems: Excelling in a Software-Driven World” published by Taylor and Francis, editor of several books and volumes and author of hundreds of research articles. He is editor for Journal of Systems and Software as well as Science of Computer Programming, chaired several conferences as general and program chair, served on numerous program committees and organised countless workshops. Jan is a fellow member of the International Software Product Management Association (ISPMA) and a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Science. Jan serves on the boards of IVER, Peltarion and Burt Intelligence and on the advisory boards of Assia Inc. in Redwood City, CA and Pure Systems GmbH (Germany). Earlier he was chairman of the board of Auqtus, Fidesmo and Remente. In the startup space, Jan is an angel investor in several startup companies. He also runs a boutique consulting firm, Boschonian AB, that offers its clients support around the implications of digitalization including the management of R&D and innovation. For more information see his website: www.janbosch.com.
Helena Holmström Olsson is a professor of computer science at Malmö University, Sweden, and principal investigator/senior researcher in the aforementioned Software Center with expertise in AI and data-driven development. Over the years, she has run projects focusing on feature experimentation, A/B testing, data-driven development practices and data for ML/DL model design and development. She is the supervisor of several PhD students in the area of data-driven development and AI Engineering. In addition, her university has a well established program related to the internet of things (IoT) as well as a research school on data driven systems.
Jan Bosch, Helena Holmström Olsson
Jan Bosch, Helena Holmström Olsson
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 17
Limitiert Can We Leverage The Agile Manifesto To Reduce Our Carbon Footprint?
Can We Leverage The Agile Manifesto To Reduce Our Carbon Footprint?

Do you know that some forecasts project that in 2030 IT will account for 21% of all energy consumption? So, if we do not change the way we implement software, we will contribute to the increase in the carbon footprint. This means it is about time to take another look at how agile development can help decrease energy consumption.

In this workshop, we'll explore how the agile principles can guide us to more sustainability, and we'll provide you with concrete ideas for increasing sustainability in your product development.

Maximum number of participants: 100

Target Audience: Developers, Managers, Scrum Master, Product Owners, Coaches, ...
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in agile would be helpful
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
The Agile Manifesto captures "better ways of developing software" yet, could this better way also take the environmental, economic, and social footprints of your software into account?

Software lifecycle creates direct and indirect carbon emissions: it has a footprint, worsening environmental problems. So, this session tries to provide the first answers to "how can the agile principles contribute to or guide sustainability?" In this workshop, we want to examine how the principles of the Agile Manifesto can provide guidance for implementing sustainability in IT.

In this workshop, we will explore the impact of the agile principles on sustainability, and how a greater awareness can change our current way of working for providing our contribution to addressing climate change.

Jutta Eckstein arbeitet weltweit als Business-Coach, Change-Manager & Beraterin. Ihr Fokus liegt auf unternehmensweiter Agilität in großen & verteilten Organisationen. Sie war von 2003-2007 im Vorstand der AgileAlliance. Sie hat einen M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, einen Dipl.-Ing. in Product-Engineering & ist als Immissionsschutzbeauftragte (Umweltschutz) zertifiziert. Jutta wurde 2011 von der Computerwoche in die Top 100 der bedeutendsten Persönlichkeiten der Deutschen IT gewählt.
Having worked as an Agile Coach/Software Engineer for the United Nations, Dr. Claudia Melo is now Director of Engineering and Tech Organizational Design at Loft and Advisory board member at Mulheres na Tecnologia (/MNT). Over the past 20 years, Claudia has joined different organizations with a focus on software engineering, connecting delivery, research and education. She conducts extensive work in Agile Methods/DevOps and Organization Design in collaboration with companies, universities, entrepreneurs, government and international organisations. She was ThoughtWorks’ Global Head of Tech Learning Development, member of the Technology Advisory Board, and CTO for Latin America. Since 2016, she has been working on ICT for Sustainability topics, aligned to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Claudia received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of São Paulo (USP), in collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). Besides contributing to scientific research, books, and industry reports, in 2015, she received the USP Outstanding Thesis Award.
Claudia can be reached @claudia_melo | https://www.linkedin.com/in/claudiamelo/ | https://claudiamelo.org/en/about/midia-e-imprensa/
Jutta Eckstein, Claudia Melo
Jutta Eckstein, Claudia Melo
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 18
The KISS Architecture Model
The KISS Architecture Model

There are several architecture models with prescribed views and notations. The Keep It Short & Simple architecture model is different. We create pieces of documentation iff they benefit stakeholders. We do so using drawing tools, not modeling tools. We say no to BDUF and yes to Important Design Up Front. We follow 7 tips for creating diagrams that are expressive, not ambiguous, and help you to successfully understand and evolve them, and build a system from them. We complement the design diagrams that describe structure and behavior with ADRs.

Target Audience: Developers and anyone else who plays the role of architect.
Prerequisites: If you've ever developed software, you're ready.
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract
Do you create or use architecture documentation? Have you ever been confused and wondered about the meaning of a box or arrow in a design diagram? Do you think architecture documentation is costly or time consuming? If your answer is yes to any of these questions, this tutorial has practical and valuable information for you. There are several proposed architecture models with prescribed views and notations. The Keep It Short and Simple architecture model is different. We create pieces of documentation if they benefit stakeholders. We do so primarily use drawing tools, not modelling tools. We say no to Big Design Up Front (BDUF) but say yes to Important Design Up Front (IDUF). We follow 7 guidelines for creating informal design diagrams that are expressive, not ambiguous, and effectively help you and others to successfully understand them, evolve them, and build a system from them. Finally, we complement the essential design diagrams that describe structure and behaviour with architecture decision records (ADRs) for the important design decisions.

In the tutorial we look at several example architectures from real world systems. Most are good examples, but we also turn a critical eye on known products' architecture diagrams with several opportunities for improvement. Participants can also share their experience throughout. The tutorial also includes a fun online game and a hands-on exercise.

Tutorial minutiae include: what is the minimum architecture documentation expected, what design decisions are important enough to deserve an ADR, examples of drawing tools, who should be responsible for architecture documentation, how to complement structural diagrams with behavior diagrams.

Paulo Merson has been programming in the small and in the large for over 30 years. He's a dev at the Brazilian Federal Court of Accounts, adjunct faculty in the Masters of Software Engineering program at Carnegie Mellon University, and faculty in the University of Brasilia masters program in Applied Computing. He often delivers professional training to fellow devs in the US and Europe. His speaking experience also includes talks at DDD Europe, OOP, XP Agile, JavaOne, SPLASH/OOPSLA, SATURN, and lectures to grad students in different universities. Paulo holds a BSc in CS from University of Brasilia and a Master of Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.
Paulo Merson
Paulo Merson
Vortrag: Mo 18
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 19
Limitiert Beyond Psychological Safety - Tools From Psychology For Enabling Intelligent, High-Performing Teams
Beyond Psychological Safety - Tools From Psychology For Enabling Intelligent, High-Performing Teams

Despite being hyped in the Agile community because of Google discovering its importance, psychological safety alone is not enough. It is a necessary but not sufficient precondition for successful intelligent and high-performing teams. But what else is needed? This workshop will present additional research as well as tools used by psychologists that boost team intelligence and performance and explore the potential for their use in their teams. Participants will have the opportunity to try some tools and learn how to design their own.

Maximum number of participants: 100

Target Audience: Coaches, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: English, basic knowledge of statistics
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Despite being hyped in the Agile community because of Google discovering its importance, psychological safety alone is not enough. It is a necessary but not sufficient precondition for successful intelligent and high-performing teams. But what else is needed? This workshop will present additional research as well as tools used by psychologists that boost team intelligence and performance and explore the potential for their use in Scrum teams.

After attending this workshop, the attendee will

  • have a basic understanding of the psychological concepts of team intelligence and performance
  • go beyond the buzzwords to understand where and how psychological safety fits into these larger concept
  • have working knowledge of a validated framework for designing exercises to increase team performance
  • have hands-on experience with psychological tools and techniques that can be used to implement and support the exercises
  • have a toolkit of techniques that they can immediately use to help their teams improve how they work together
A quiet and reserved researcher and practitioner, Joseph Pelrine is considered by cognoscenti to be one of the pioneers and top experts on Agile methods. He has spent over 25 years defining and refining processes to help some of the world’s most well-known companies improve their ability to satisfy the needs of their customers. As a psychologist, his focus on people and his experience in applying leading-edge techniques from social complexity and psychology to process optimisation goes far beyond the domain of software development and extends to the whole organisation.
Born and raised in Krakow, Poland, Weronika Ilczyszyn originally started an academic career. After earning her PhD in microbiology, she decided that she would like to work on a more macro scale, and she moved into IT. At present, she works at Motorola Solutions as ScrumMaster, helping her teams develop mission-critical communication products that help save lives. Her interest in quantitative research has led her to collaborate with Joseph Pelrine on discovering new ways to analyse and optimize team performance.
Joseph Pelrine, Weronika Ilczyszyn
Joseph Pelrine, Weronika Ilczyszyn
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17:15 - 18:00
KeyMo
KEYNOTE
KEYNOTE

More information about the OOP keynotes can be found here starting Dec. 15, 2021.

Track: Keynote
Vortrag: KeyMo
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 3
Domain-Driven Game Design
Domain-Driven Game Design

After two decades of being a business software developer, a DDD consultant and an Event Storming aficionado, I started to build a game and had no clue how to.
So I modelled the heck out of the game using Event Storming and implemented it using all the DDD patterns, functional and object oriented architecture patterns and even CQRS & Event Sourcing.
Let me show you how much fun it is to build a game, using everything you know about business software and subsequently, how your business software building abilities will improve from building games.

Target Audience: Senior Developers, DDD Enthusiasts, Game Developers, Software Architects
Prerequisites: The will to put the fun back into functioning business software
Level: Advanced

Marco Heimeshoff is a trainer, speaker and software developer from Germany. He organizes KanDDDinsky, a conference about Domain-driven Design and the art of business software and co-founded the german DDD community in 2013 and VirtualDDD.com in 2019. Between consulting companies around the globe and his day job in building health care software, you'll find him speaking at conferences about DDD, socio-technical systems and first principles.
Marco Heimeshoff
Marco Heimeshoff
Vortrag: Nmo 3
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 4
How to Enable all Voices of Your Organization – Triggering Collaborative Insight & Action
How to Enable all Voices of Your Organization – Triggering Collaborative Insight & Action

Diversity in organizations can be a challenge or a wealth of potential. You choose - but how? In this session we'll offer you solid perspectives, concrete tools and examples, so you will be better enabled, how to foster deep, also challenging, but definitely fruitful collaboration across your organization.

Target Audience: Managers, HR Leads, Change Agents, Coaches
Prerequisites: Interest in Leadership, Collaboration, Organizational Change
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract
Exponential change, globalization, an increase in interdependence, complexity has put societies, but also organizations at the edge of known territory. Diversity has become a challenge and requirement at the same time. Leading under such conditions requires a different set of perspectives. Organizations need new skills and tools to overcome these obstacles.
In order to enable the growth of diversity in any organization, it very much helps gain an understanding what makes the system(s) of this organization tick. For meaningful action to happen, whatever your position (formal leader or inspired change agent), you will create a space, where voices (especially marginalized ones) can be heard, get into conversation, so to gain deeper insights and more awareness. This is the soil for new ideas and more effective solutions to overcome the pressing challenges, every organization is confronted with.
This session will provide a solid combination of sound concepts, tools and examples, how to overcome the challenges of a siloed organization, how to overcome domination of single voices, how to overcome unskillful conflict behavior. We will offer the audience concrete and immediately actionable practices, they can use for fostering dialog between small and larger groups in their organizations. Last but not least, they will walk away with a self assessment questionnaire, providing first insight on their own views and behaviors.

Mike Leber is an international Executive Consultant and Business Agility Coach, an Organizational Developer and Systems coach with more than 25 years experience in the field. His work is dedicated to highly Adaptive Organizations, fitter for delivering awesome products and services and thriving from the natural intelligence of its system. Mike has been working with large international groups as well as in the startup domain. Together with his clients he designs innovative and collaborative spaces for delivering fresh business models. He regularly speaks at international conferences and events, where you can meet him across the globe. Get in touch, if you like to take a step towards fresh approaches for management, leadership, service delivery and change.
Mike Leber
Mike Leber
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, (Dienstag, 01.Februar 2022)
09:00 - 10:45
Di 1.1
Jenseits Micro-Frontends: Der Frontend-Modulith
Jenseits Micro-Frontends: Der Frontend-Modulith

Micro-Frontends eigenen sich nicht in allen Szenarien! Diese Session stellt einen alternativen Ansatz vor: Frontend-Modulithen. Wir besprechen das Abbilden fachlicher Domänen, die Kategorisierung von Bibliotheken sowie Zugriffseinschränkungen zum Erzwingen entkoppelter Teilsysteme. Außerdem nutzen wir inkrementelle Builds und einen Build Cache zur drastischen Beschleunigung des CI-Prozesses. Am Ende wissen Sie, ob Frontend-Modulithen für Sie der richtige Ansatz sind und wie Sie Ihre Anwendungen damit aufbauen.

Zielpublikum: Architekt:innen, Entwickler:innen
Voraussetzungen: Grundlagenwissen zu JavaScript von Vorteil
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Fortgeschritten

Manfred Steyer ist Trainer, Berater und programmierender Architekt mit Fokus auf Angular, Google Developer Expert (GDE) für Angular und Trusted Collaborator im Angular-Team. Erunterstützt Firmen im gesamten deutschen Sprachraum, schreibt für O'Reilly, Heise und das Java-Magazin, spricht regelmäßig auf Konferenzen.
Applications Instead of Libraries: Micro Frontends Implemented Through Module Federation
Applications Instead of Libraries: Micro Frontends Implemented Through Module Federation

Imagine you have an enterprise frontend monolith. Due to explosive growth, around 30 teams work on it, with about 100 different use cases. How do you keep this system scalable and consistent?
That's the question we faced inside Partner Home at Wayfair. I'm going to share our experience implementing a micro frontend architecture based on React to distribute shared concerns as long-lived applications. We used module federation, a new feature in Webpack 5.
I'll talk about the general architecture, plus an overview of our technical solution.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: English, Frontend Architecture, React
Level: Expert

Mario Fernandez develops software for a living, and then he goes home and continues thinking about software because he just can't get enough.
He is a full-stack engineer with infrastructure skills. He has led multiple agile delivery teams, being an individual contributor, driving architecture topics, and coaching and supporting other team members.
He believes in high-quality software and advocates for Continuous Delivery, Tes- Driven Development, and quick iteration. He writes and speaks about his experience regularly.
Manfred Steyer
Mario Fernandez
Manfred Steyer

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Mario Fernandez
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09:00 - 10:30
Di 2.1
Orchestrating Collaboration at Different Levels of Scale
Orchestrating Collaboration at Different Levels of Scale

Orchestrating the work of hundreds or thousands of people working at different locations around the world presents a set of challenges specific to that kind of context. It is not simply a matter of “scaling up", we need to understand underlying principles and patterns and make them work. With this session we invite you into a conversation about how to improve the way leaders and teams collaborate in our organizations. You will experience a workshop that you can reproduce for your organisation to create supporting structures that scale

Target Audience: Thinkers, Decision Makers, Architects, Managers, Coaches, Scrum Masters, Product Owners
Prerequisites: Curiosity and some experience in working in large organisations
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Orchestrating the work of hundreds or thousands of people working at different locations around the world presents a set of challenges specific to that kind of context. It is not simply a matter of “scaling up” what works for orchestrating the work of a small number of co-located people, or even a small number of distributed teams. The specific practices necessary for success will vary and evolve. Variety of practice is essential to creating successful outcomes.
There is a useful set of underlying principles and patterns that we bring to our work. They enable us to create a wide variety of context-aware practices that serve the needs of the people in our organizations, and support them in collaborating to create value for our customers.
With this session we invite you into a conversation about how to improve the way leaders and teams collaborate in our organizations. We will look at teams’ needs regarding autonomy, leadership, and support, and at leaders’ needs regarding strategy, challenges, and responsibility. One specific theme we explore in this session is that of the relationships between leaders and teams, and how we leverage those relationships to orchestrate work and outcomes.
Through this session you will experience a workshop that you can reproduce for your organisation. We will share our setup guides, tools, and materials with you so that you can create supporting structures to more effectively orchestrate collaboration at different scales in your organization.

Olaf Lewitz went from programmer to manager to coach to become the trust artist. He integrates his passions: freedom of choice, distributing authority and psychology in his work with transforming human systems.
Ken Power is a software engineering professional with more than 20 years’ experience implementing software systems and building agile teams and organizations. He is currently developing AI-enabled systems for self-driving cars and intelligent autonomous systems.
Olaf Lewitz, Ken Power
Olaf Lewitz, Ken Power
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09:00 - 10:30
Di 6.1
Organizational Agility in a Post-Pandemic World
Organizational Agility in a Post-Pandemic World

How will organizations keep agility alive after their initial agile transformation? The question of what happens if agile becomes daily business is even more intriguing in this post-pandemic COVID era. Will AGILE survive these unparalleled insecure times? Participants in this workshop will explore what is needed to sustainably ‘safeguard’ an enterprise agile delivery culture after the initial ‘agile transformation’. The workshop hosts will share their observations of working in a big financial organization and will invite participants to share theirs so that collectively, we can gain insight and define potential countermeasures.

Target Audience: Anyone interested in transformational agility challenges, e.g. Change Lead, Coach, BusArchitect
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Participants in this workshop will explore what is needed to move forward after the initial ‘agile transformation’, to sustainably ‘safeguard’ an enterprise agile delivery culture. The question of what happens if agile becomes daily business is even more intriguing in this post-pandemic COVID era. How will organizations keep agility alive after their initial agile transformation? When organizational systems come under too much pressure; how ‘VUCA’* resistant are our agile enterprise cultures?
Lieke Jansen and Eric Abelen are senior Agile Enterprise Coaches at ING in the Netherlands. They both contributed to ING's Spotify inspired, big-scale transformation towards an agile way of working, some seven years ago. As of then, they have successfully coached a wide variety of departments and organizations within ING to adopt and sustain an effective healthy agile delivery culture. Being key players of a massive enterprise agile transformation, they also observe some challenges related to upkeep of the resulting way of working. Because people come and go, and in our VUCA world business and process change is frequent. What options do we have in this reality of ongoing change to keep the ‘agile enterprise culture’ strong and resilient?
Also, in the Covid pandemic we learned that people and organizations can respond to change quickly, especially those organizations that adopted a culture of agility. But after a period of unparalleled social restrictions, how does this affect our agile corporate cultures? Has the trauma of the pandemic infected us with a renewed urge to feel ‘in control’ of the future and has this irrevocably injured our appetite for organic growth and agility?
In this workshop we will explore this interesting and urgent question together with you. We will share key observations from experience working with a wide variety of delivery and leadership teams and their related organizational structures. We hope that workshop participants are willing to add their observations and experiences to ours. In interactive dialogue sessions we hope to collectively engage in sense-making and to define basic anti-patterns and growth-paths.
( * VUCA = Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity)

Eric Abelen is Enterprise Agile Coach at ING Netherlands with agile transformation lead experience in ING's Support functions, HR, and (IT driven) delivery organizations. Eric's professional profile is that of Agile Coach, Lean Consultant, Business Manager, Process Manager, and Program/Change Manager. Before joining ING, he helped the Customer Care and Logistics organizations of Hewlett-Packard to adopt global ways of working. Eric enjoys reflecting on enterprise agility health, see e.g. Supporting Agile Adoption Initiative | Agile Alliance.
Lieke Jansen is an Enterprise Agile Coach at ING Netherlands. After different roles in Account Management, Project Management and General Management, she became Agile Enterprise Coach in 2015. From the start of the Agile Transformation, she has been involved and has coached (leadership) teams at different stages of their ambition to become high performing. Cultural challenges, team dynamics and systemic transition management have her special interest.
Eric Abelen, Lieke Jansen
09:00 - 10:30
Di 9.1
C++20: What's In There For You
C++20: What's In There For You

C++20 is now a year old. Time to take a closer look at the benefits you get when using C++ for standards 11 to 20. You learn about Coroutines by building a coroutine-based parser. The new ranges and the spaceship operator help you write less code. You will learn how Concepts help you to express constraints better and improve error messages. Doing things at compile-time saves run-time. Let‘s see how C++20 improves your code with the new features consteval and constinit. After this talk, you learned some C++20 features and saw the improvements to C++17 code.

Target Audience: Developers
Prerequisites: Knowledge about at least C++11
Level: Advanced       

Extended Abstract
C++20 is now a year old. The major compilers already provide a solid support for the new standard. It is time to take a closer look and figure out the benefits you get when using C++20. Because there are so many improvements in C++20, we will focus on: Concepts, Coroutines, ranges, the spaceship operator, and compile-time evaluation.
Coroutines are the feature that likely will have a strong impact on future finite state machine code. In a brief tour, we will see what we need to do for building a coroutine-based byte-stream parser and how this code is so much more beautiful than without Coroutines.
Less code is always a good thing. The new ranges part of the STL helps us achieve this goal. We will take a brief look at how ranges simplify our code.
Speaking about less code, how about writing a class with all comparison operations without having to write an awful amount of boilerplate code? Sounds good? Then let's see how C++20 helps us there with the spaceship operator.
And while we are speaking about less code, generic programming comes to mind. Concepts give us a whole new way to express constraints and requirements in generic code. Concepts make our code better readable while, at the same time, give us way better error messages.
We don't stop there. Together we will look at the updates to the compile-time world. With consteval and constinit we have two new keywords allowing us new things to do. A lot of former restrictions of constexpr functions were dropped as well. The most popular is probably the ability to dynamically allocate memory at compile-time. We will explore these features using some practical examples.
After this talk, you will have seen the probably most impactful features of C++20. You learned by examples how to use them. The comparisons to pre-C++20 code give you a good understanding of what your benefits are by using C++20.

Andreas Fertig, CEO of Unique Code GmbH, is an experienced trainer and lecturer for C++ for standards 11 to 20. Andreas is involved in the C++ standardization committee, in which the new standards are developed. At international conferences, he presents how code can be written better. He publishes specialist articles, e.g., for iX magazine, and has published several textbooks on C++. With C++ Insights (https://cppinsights.io), Andreas has created an internationally recognized tool that enables users to look behind the scenes of C++ and thus to understand constructs even better. Before working as a trainer and consultant, he worked for Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH for ten years as a C++ software developer and architect focusing on embedded systems.
Andreas Fertig
Andreas Fertig
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 3.2
Rust in a Polyglot World, from Client to Cloud
Rust in a Polyglot World, from Client to Cloud

While Rust is typically pitched as systems programming language, it is equally adept at application development thanks to its high level features and great tooling. In addition to increased performance, native code has the advantage that it can easily be reused across different system components, an advantage even more pronounced in polyglot environments. In this talk, we would like to present our experience of using Rust to write core components in such a polyglot system.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of Python, Java
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
While Rust is typically pitched as systems programming language, it is equally adept at application development thanks to its high level features and great tooling. In addition to increased performance, native code has the advantage that it can easily be reused across different system components, an advantage even more pronounced in polyglot environments.
In this talk, we would like to present our experience of using Rust to write core components in such a polyglot system. The systems spans different contexts, from client to cloud, and different programming languages, from Python to Java, respectively. We will showcase how the Rust language itself and its tooling simplified this task and discuss different integration patterns.

Christopher Prohm is working as a Data Scientist for Volkswagen. His main focus is the application of machine learning and data analytics to problems in the area of technical development.
Christopher Prohm
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 4.2
Creating Tech Workplaces Where Women Can Thrive
Creating Tech Workplaces Where Women Can Thrive

Women in technology leave the industry at a higher rate than any other profession. In her invited talk, Nicola Marsden draws on deep research into what women love about work and what they don’t. Together with Karen Holtzblatt, the visionary behind Contextual Design, she has developed a research-driven framework and best-practice interventions to achieve better retention and work life culture for women in technology. She presents the framework and looks at Scrum as an example in terms of challenges and benefits for women.

Target Audience: Managers, Decision Makers, Agile Coaches, Project Leaders, Developers
Prerequisites: Interest :-)
Level: Basic

Nicola Marsden is a professor of social informatics at Heilbronn University, Germany. She combines insights from psychology, software engineering, design research, and organizational behavior to improve collaboration and foster innovation in tech. Her research is based on a combination of experience in both academia and industry, often with a gender perspective. Her extensive work with tech companies uses a theory-based, practical perspective to design, implement, and manage innovation projects, change processes, training and development programs and strategic projects.
Nicola Marsden
Nicola Marsden
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 7.2
Automating Industrial Processes Using Computer Vision
Automating Industrial Processes Using Computer Vision

Today Computer vision has taken a significant spot in our phones, our roads, our markets that we don’t always even recognize if and where it is deployed. Nonetheless, our industries today have so much potential to automate (using CV) their recurrent tasks to reduce costs, while simultaneously increasing quality of the product and efficiency of the process itself. We will learn about some interesting industrial examples which benefit first-hand from simple automation and perhaps get inspired by it.

Target Audience: Software Developers, Data Scientists, AI Engineers, Managers, Project Leader, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
In the era of Industry 4.0, we are focusing on digitalizing operations using data. We let cameras ‘see’, detect and classify objects and even take some decisions for us. In this talk, we discuss what is Computer Vision (CV), and learn how could different industries benefit / save recurring costs from it. We will discuss some interesting industrial applications of Computer Vision, for you to get some inspiration on how it can potentially help your company grow, or just to understand the advancements in today’s world.
In these 45 mins, we discuss how CV can:
- automate the industrial processes
- be more then more efficient,
- ensure the product quality,
- or detect anomalies.
Using some demos and videos you’ll get the chance to consolidate the knowledge acquired during the talk.

Akarsha Sehwag works as a Senior Data Scientist in Steadforce Advanced Analytics Team. She is skilled in Machine Learning overall, but aims to specialise in Computer Vision. Before joining Steadforce, she has gained experience in telecommunications and renewable industry. She comes from the Computer Science background with a focus on Data Science, with her research published in two major conferences.
Akarsha Sehwag
Akarsha Sehwag
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 9.2
Leaving Template Meta-Programming Behind
Leaving Template Meta-Programming Behind

In this talk I will show a prototype of CTRE (Compile Time Regular Expressions) which uses the least amount of template metaprogramming possible. Instead, I will use constexpr, consteval functions and other features of C++20 to bring the same features as the original library but with more performance. In the course of the talk I will focus on major problematic points of the previous design of the library and will demonstrate how to replace them with mostly constexpr code.

Target Audience: Developers
Prerequisites: Template meta-programming in C++
Level: Expert

Hana Dusíková is a staff scientist in Avast Software where she is working on distributed and high-performance backend systems. She is the chair of SG7 (Study Group for Reflection and Compile-Time Programming) and Czechia National Body representative in WG21 (ISO C++ committee). Hana is also the author of the CTRE library (Compile Time Regular Expressions).
Hana Dusíková
Hana Dusíková
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15:00 - 15:45
KeyDi 2
KEYNOTE
KEYNOTE

More information about the OOP keynotes can be found here starting Dec. 15, 2021.

Track: Keynote
Vortrag: KeyDi 2
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 1.3
The Root of All Evil: Shared Mutable State and How to Get Rid of It
The Root of All Evil: Shared Mutable State and How to Get Rid of It

Software is often resistant to modernization efforts, no matter if it's about phasing out obsolete technologies, migration to the cloud, or establishing modern architecture. The culprit is usually a dependency or obsolete assumption that's too closely coupled to the codebase. But what's the underlying root cause of all that coupling? Often, it's shared, mutable, synchronous state. We will look at a real-world project, and we'll dig ourselves out of the hole it's dug itself into using refactoring, event sourcing, and functional programming.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Some programming
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
As shared mutable state is the core paradigm of object-oriented programming, it tends to be ubiquitous in OO projects. How to avoid it then? The example has followed a familiar path: Convenient tooling allowed the project to get off the ground fast, but tied it to its underlying technologies. By the time support for those technologies has expired, coupling has gotten so strong that huge resources are expended on keeping things going "just one more day". If you've seen projects like this hit a wall, this talk is for you.

Michael Sperber is CEO of Active Group in Tübingen, Germany. Mike specializes in functional programming and has been an internationally recognized expert in the field: He has spoken at the top conferences in programming languages, authored many papers on the subject as well as several books. Moreover, he is an expert on teaching programming.
Michael Sperber
Michael Sperber
Vortrag: Di 1.3
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 3.3
Making your Bureaucracy Value Stream Lean and Automated
Making your Bureaucracy Value Stream Lean and Automated

In today’s software-driven world, the integrity of software assets isn’t just a regulatory and compliance requirement, it’s critical for maintaining trust and avoiding irreparable damage to your brand and reputation. We found that Compliance, Software Chain of custody and in-App Security as well as API Security are seen as an overburdened bureaucracy. But they have to be part of your software value stream. So the question is, how they can be so lean, automated and optimized that they can contribute actual value inside your DevSecOps Approach?

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Project development experience
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
In today’s software-driven world, the integrity of software assets isn’t just a regulatory and compliance requirement, it’s critical for maintaining trust and avoiding irreparable damage to your brand and reputation.
The same also applies to Quality, In-App Security, and API Security in a more and more digitized world.
In a lot of case studies, we found that Compliance, Software Chain of custody and in-App Security as well as API Security are seen as an overburdened bureaucracy. But in all cases, they have to be part of your software value stream.
So the question is, how they can be so lean, automated, and optimized that they can contribute actual value inside your DevSecOps Approach? In the lecture we provide some key insight in how to solve that dilemma and integrate them into your day-to-day work.

Matthias Zieger ist seit mehr als 20 Jahren in der IT-Industrie unterwegs – mit den Themen Softwareentwicklung, Architektur, Application Lifecycle Management und DevOps u.a. für IBM, Borland, Microsoft, codecentric und XebiaLabs. Im Moment hilft er großen Unternehmen, ihre Software schneller in Produktion zu bringen mit den Releaseorchestrierungs- und Deploymentlösungen von XebiaLabs – von klassischen .net und JEE-Umgebungen über Docker, Kubernetes und Cloud bis hin zu Serverless-Architekturen. 
Matthias Zieger
Matthias Zieger
Vortrag: Di 3.3
Themen: Security
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 9.3
C++17 Polymorphic Memory Resources (pmr) and STL Containers for Embedded Applications
C++17 Polymorphic Memory Resources (pmr) and STL Containers for Embedded Applications

For many embedded C++ applications, compliance with the AUTOSAR or Misra rules is required. Among them is AUTOSAR Rule A18-5-5 which does not allow memory allocations with new. Since new and delete violate A18-5-5, the default STL containers must not be used in applications requiring AUTOSAR compliance. This holds for many embedded applications. With the allocators available since C++17 in the namespace std::pmr (polymorphic memory resources) these requirements can often be satisfied.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leader
Prerequisites: Good C++ knowledge
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
For many embedded C++ applications, compliance with the AUTOSAR or Misra rules is required. Among them is AUTOSAR Rule A18-5-5.
Memory management functions shall ensure the following:
(a) deterministic behavior resulting with the existence of worst-case execution time,
(b) avoiding memory fragmentation,
(c) avoid running out of memory,
(d) avoiding mismatched allocations or deallocations,
(e) no dependence on non-deterministic calls to kernel.

This rule has far-reaching consequences, because per default the C++ standard library containers allocate their memory with new and free it with delete. These calls
• do not have deterministic execution times.
• can cause memory fragmentation.

Since new and delete violate A18-5-5, the default STL containers must not be used in applications requiring AUTOSAR compliance. This holds for many embedded applications.
With the allocators available since C++17 in the namespace std::pmr (polymorphic memory resources) these requirements can often be satisfied. This means that, for the first time in the history of C++, the containers and algorithms of the C++ standard library can be used in applications that require AUTOSAR Rule A18-5-5.

Prof. Richard Kaiser führt seit vielen Jahren Seminare für Firmen durch, vor allem über Software-Entwicklung und die Programmiersprachen C# und C++ sowie C. Zu seinen Kunden gehören renommierte Weltkonzerne und kleine und mittelständische Unternehmen.
Nach dem Studium der Mathematik an der Universität Tübingen und der FU Berlin war er an der Pädagogischen Hochschule Reutlingen in der Lehrerausbildung tätig und hat sich intensiv mit Mathematikdidaktik beschäftigt. Danach war er Software-Entwickler (v.a. für technische Anwendungen), bei einigen Firmen Leiter der Software-Abteilung, über 20 Jahre Professor an der Dualen Hochschule Lörrach, über 30 Jahre freiberuflicher Trainer für C, C++, C#, Speaker bei Konferenzen, Mitglied im DIN Normierungsausschuss Informationstechnik NI-22, usw.
Richard Kaiser
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17:45 - 18:45
Di 1.4
Writing less code with Serverless on AWS
Writing less code with Serverless on AWS

The purpose of Serverless is to focus on writing the code that delivers business value and offload undifferentiated heavy lifting to the Cloud providers or SaaS vendors. Today’s code quickly becomes tomorrow’s technical debt. The less you own, the better it is from the maintainability point of view. In this talk I will go through examples of the various Serverless architectures on AWS where you glue together different Serverless managed services, significantly reducing the amount of the code written to perform the task. Own less, build more!

Zielpublikum: Developers, Architects, Decision Makers
Voraussetzungen: Basic understanding of AWS Serverless Services
Level: Advanced 

Vadym Kazulkin is Head of Development at ip.labs GmbH, a 100% subsidiary of the FUJIFLM Group, based in Bonn. ip.labs is the world's leading white label e-commerce software imaging company. Vadym has been involved with the Java ecosystem for over 20 years. His current focus and interests include the design and implementation of highly scalable and available solutions, Serverless and AWS Cloud. Vadym is the co-organizer of the Java User Group Bonn and Serverless Bonn Meetup, and a frequent speaker at various Meetups and conferences.
Vadym Kazulkin
Vadym Kazulkin
Vortrag: Di 1.4
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17:45 - 18:45
Di 6.4
Adaptive Systems with Wardley Mapping, Domain-Driven Design, and Team Topologies
Adaptive Systems with Wardley Mapping, Domain-Driven Design, and Team Topologies

In a world of rapid changes and increasing uncertainties, organizations have to continuously adapt and evolve to remain competitive and excel in the market. In such a dynamic business landscape organizations need to design for adaptability. Designing for adaptability requires understanding the landscape organizations are operating in, identifying patterns of change, applying principles for organizational fitness, and making mindful strategic decisions to adapt change.

Target Audience: Software Architects, Tech Leads, Engineering Manager, VP of Engineering
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract
Organizations need to aim for building systems and team organizations aligned to the business needs and business strategy and evolving them for adaptability to new changes and unknown environments.
This talk brings different perspectives and techniques together from business strategy (Wardley Mapping), software architecture (Domain-Driven Design), and team organization (Team Topologies) as a powerful toolset to design, build and evolve adaptive systems and team structures for a fast flow of change.

Susanne Kaiser is an independent tech consultant supporting organizations to build and run software products from idea to production with a focus on socio-technical systems. Susanne was previously working as a startup CTO. She has a background in computer sciences and experience in software development and software architecture for more than 18 years. Susanne presents regularly at international tech conferences as a speaker.
17:45 - 18:45
Di 9.4
MISRA C++ 202x
MISRA C++ 202x

New MISRA C++ 202x are coming. This release will address modern C++ and thus is relevant not only for safety critical code in the automotive sector, but also for day-to-day C++ development. Expect the new MISRA rules to be less "miserable" for your day-to-day coding and use static analysis tooling to enforce them. Understand what kind of C++ will be considered unsafe, get examples of guidelines and learn which rules better to suppress in static analysis tools in non-safety-critical software.

Target Audience: Developers
Prerequisites: C++
Level: Advanced 

Extended Abstract
New MISRA C++ guidelines are coming. In contrast to the previous release in 2008, MISRA C++ will address modern C++ as it is used in modern automotive systems. It is expected that other domains with safety critical software will incorporate MISRA C++ as well. In addition many of the rules, especially those supported by corresponding static analysis tools, can make your own C++ coding practices better. The talk briefly introduce the development of safety critical software, highlight some of the modern MISRA C++ rules applicable to all kinds of code and will also show corners of the rule set, better avoided for "normal" C++ code. The latter is important to know, when you are asked to retrofit your code to the output of a static analyzer tuned to MISRA-C++.
* History of MISRA C++ guidelines
* Peculiarities of software development for safety-critical systems
* Example guidelines and how they influence coding
* "strong stuff" that should not bother in normal C++
* Outlook on further revisions

Peter Sommerlad is a consultant and trainer for C++ and agile software development. He was professor and lead the Institute for Software at HSR Rapperswil. Peter is co-author of the books POSA Vol. 1 and Security Patterns and contributed to "97 things every programmer should know". Peter is an ACM Senior Member and member of ACCU, IEEE CS, and the ISO WG21( C++ ) and WG23 (vulnerabilities) committees. Peter participated in the creation of MISRA C++202x.
Peter Sommerlad
Peter Sommerlad
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, (Mittwoch, 02.Februar 2022)
09:00 - 10:30
Mi 2.1
From Practice to Patterns: How to Successfully Drive an Agile Transformation
From Practice to Patterns: How to Successfully Drive an Agile Transformation

What have we learnt from the transformations in large companies? And how can that help you improving your chances for success?

The DACH30 group is a workgroup of experienced transformation drivers and coaches from over 30 large companies across different industries. One sub-workgroup has been working on these two questions and we recently published our findings.

In this workshop we will share our transformation experiences and work out with you on patterns, that have proven to be helpful in driving agile transformations successfully.

Target Audience:
Leaders especially on executive level and organizational development coaches
Prerequisites: Experiences in driving an agile transformation in a large organization
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract

As internal Agile Transformation Coaches from large enterprises we have been supporting quite a number of transformations in various contexts. And as members of a workgroup for Business Agility we were asking ourselves „What can we learn from the different company transformations in the different markets and branches with different cultures? Is there anything they have in common?“ We were quite thrilled to identify some principles and helpful insights and learnings based on success and failures which we found applicable to most of the transformations.

To provide inspiration for others, executives and leaders especially, we summarized these principles and learnings in a Transformation Travel Guide for Growing Adaptive Organizations, including a Travel Map, Travel Tips and also some exemplary Travel Routes based on real-life case studies.

In this session we will provide an overview on the Travel Guide and some deeper insights into learnings from two Transformation Journeys. Study.

Our focus is not on scaling Agile working but rather on achieving Agility on an enterprise level. Hence we are not only looking towards Agile but rather at various methods, thinking models, and techniques in order to find the right approach for specific business problems to solve and for developing organizational towards more adaptivity and resilience.

We are a smaller group from the DACH30 Initiative working on ‚Growing Adaptive Organizations’. growing-adaptive-organizations.org

Hendrik Esser is a senior transformation expert, driver and catalyst with more than 20 years of leadership experience at Ericsson. He is also internationally active in communities advancing business agility across industries.
Andrea Maier has been working as an Agile Business Coach at Deutsche Telekom since 2009. She supports executives on their journey towards Business Agility and organizational transformation. Andrea is co-founder of the DACH30 group www.next-level-working.com.
Hendrik Esser, Andrea Maier
Hendrik Esser, Andrea Maier
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 3.1
Agile Games – Creating Business Impact
Agile Games – Creating Business Impact

(Agile) Games are sounding throughout the land. Everyone plays games and anyone guides games. However, what makes playing games "interesting" from the business owner's perspective? 

We look into the criteria of effectiveness and efficiency of games and thus the capabilities of creating business impact for the company.

As such, it turns out a game - is just a game and remains a play if one does not align with underlying business needs. Sounds familiar? But you wonder how to do so?

In this talk, we will look in a 4-Step-Modelmaking the obvious tangible. And in the end, it becomes a structured approach how one might create business impact too.

Target Audience: Moderators, (young) Scrum Masters, Project Leaders, Managers, Decision-Makers, Facilitators
Prerequisites: General understanding of games and agility, and how to lead games successfully
Level: Basic

Anne Hoffmann is an expert in self-pathed leadership. For more than 15 years, she is leading international teams successfully into higher performance. By changing ourselves, we are able to change the world around us, is what she beliefs in and what her (agile) games activities are designed for. Anne is in her final steps on her Phd in "Using Improvisation Theater in (Project) Management Training" as well as co-authoring a book on "Agile Games".
Improving Your Quality and Testing Skills with Gamification
Improving Your Quality and Testing Skills with Gamification

So many challenges, so little time. As testers or quality engineers, we need to sharpen the saw, but how? Gamification can be a way to look at how you're doing and find out where to improve. It's a great way to have everyone engaged and get the best out of people.

In this presentation, Ben Linders will show how playing games (onsite or online) with the Agile Testing Coaching Cards and Agile Quality Coaching Cards help to explore your current quality and testing practice and decide as a team on what to improve or experiment with.

Target Audience: Testers, Agile Teams, Tech Leads, Technical Coaches, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract

The Agile Testing Coaching Cards and Agile Quality Coaching Cards are a deck of cards with statements that help people to share and reflect. Examples of cards are "Testers help developers design acceptance criteria for user stories", "Failing tests get proper attention even when no defect in the product has been detected", and "Refactoring is done to keep code maintainable and reduce technical debt".

Playing games with these coaching cards (onsite or online), you can learn from each other. Teams can use the coaching cards to discuss quality and testing values, principles, and practices, and share their experiences and learnings.

Different game formats can be used to share experiences on testing and quality principles and practices and explore how they can be applied effectively. The playing formats from the Agile Self-assessment Game (benlinders.com/game) can be used to play with these cards. This presentation provides an overview of playing formats and will inspire you to come up with your own formats.

Facilitation is key when playing with these coaching cards. Ben Linders will present how to prepare a game session and facilitate it, what can be done to keep people engaged, and how debriefing can help to pull out learnings and ideas for improvement.

Takeaways:

- Show how to use gamification to self-assess your current way of working.

- Present examples of playing games with the Agile Testing Coaching Cards and Agile Quality Coaching Cards.

- Explore how facilitating games can help to enhance quality and testing in agile teams.

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality, and Continuous Improvement. As an adviser, trainer, and coach, he helps organizations with effectively deploying software development and management practices. He focuses on continuous improvement, collaboration and communication, and professional development, to deliver business value to customers. Ben is an active member of networks on Agile, Lean, and Quality, and a well-known speaker and author.


Anne Hoffmann
Ben Linders
Ben Linders
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 4.1
Und jetzt das Ganze noch mal in Grün: Wie wir mit Agile die Welt retten könnten
Und jetzt das Ganze noch mal in Grün: Wie wir mit Agile die Welt retten könnten

Wollen wir unseren Enkeln eine lebenswerte Welt hinterlassen, müssen wir das grundlegende Paradigma unseres Wirtschaftssystems umbauen: Weg vom ausbeuterischen Wirtschaften, hin zu einem regenerativen, demokratischeren und inklusiven Wirtschaften.

Der Vortrag ist ein Plädoyer dafür, nicht auf Politiker, Konzernchefs oder ein Wunder zu warten, sondern selbstbewusst aktiv zu werden. Wir stellen erste Ansätze vor, wie Agilität konkret genutzt werden kann, um den Umbau der Wirtschaft in Angriff zu nehmen.

Zielpublikum: Manager:innen, Entscheider:innen, Projektleiter, Teamleiter, ...
Voraussetzungen: Fachkenntnisse agiler Methoden,
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Fortgeschritten

Extended Abstract

Vor über 20 Jahren entstand das agile Manifest, das eine radikal neue Arbeitsweise für die Software-Entwicklung proklamierte. Was damals von vielen belächelt wurde, ist heute auch außerhalb der Software-Entwicklung gang und gäbe. Wir haben gesehen, dass agiles Arbeiten Teams effektiver machen und damit das Leben von Menschen positiv beeinflussen kann. Doch auch wenn sich das „Wie“ des Arbeitens verändert hat: Neue Geschäftsmodelle sind dadurch kaum entstanden.

Heute stehen wir jedoch vor einer neuen, ungleich größeren Herausforderung. Wenn wir unseren Kindern und Enkeln eine lebenswerte Welt hinterlassen wollen, müssen wir das grundlegende Paradigma unseres Wirtschaftssystems umbauen: Weg vom ausbeuterischen Wirtschaften, das Finanzmittel konzentriert und massive Ungleichheit erzeugt, hin zu einem regenerativen, demokratischeren und inklusiven Wirtschaften.

Die Sache ist: Einerseits weiß kaum jemand genau, wie nachhaltige Geschäftsmodelle tatsächlich aussehen müssen, welche Technologien noch entstehen und sich durchsetzen werden. Andererseits läuft uns die Zeit davon. Es herrscht Unsicherheit, gepaart mit Zeitdruck.

Genau das ist doch das ursprüngliche Spielfeld agiler Denk- und Arbeitsweisen! Gerade die Community hält alle Tools in den Händen, mit denen Unternehmen regenerative Geschäftsmodelle entwickeln können, die sogar wirtschaftlicher sind als die existierenden. Lasst uns doch die Zukunft gemeinsam gestalten, so wie wir es vor 20 Jahren schon mal gemacht haben. Arbeiten wir mit Unternehmen und Menschen, die diesen Planeten durch enkelfähiges Business erhalten wollen!

Der Vortrag ist ein Plädoyer dafür, nicht auf Politiker, Konzernchefs oder ein Wunder zu warten, sondern selbstbewusst aktiv zu werden. Wir stellen erste Ansätze vor, wie Agilität konkret genutzt werden kann, um den Umbau der Wirtschaft in Angriff zu nehmen.

Boris Gloger, 45, ist Gründer und Geschäftsführer der Boris Gloger Consulting GmbH mit Sitz in Baden-Baden und Wien. Die Managementberatung ist auf das Management-Framework Scrum spezialisiert. Weltweit setzen Unternehmen das iterative Vorgehensmodell für die Produkt- und Organisationsentwicklung ein. Darüber hinaus bietet Boris Gloger Consulting für Fach- und Führungskräfte Training und Consulting im Bereich des agilen Managements. Er ist zudem Autor mehrerer Bücher, darunter 'Scrum - Produkte zuverlässig und schnell entwickeln', 'Erfolgreich mit Scrum - Einflussfaktor Personalmanagement', 'Der agile Festpreis: Leitfaden für wirklich erfolgreiche IT-Projekt-Verträge', 'Das Scrum-Prinzip: Agile Organisationen aufbauen und gestalten' und 'Wie schätzt man in agilen Projekten: - oder wieso Scrum-Projekte erfolgreicher sind'.
Boris Gloger hat als erster Certified Scrum Trainer seit 2004 über 5000 Menschen für Scrum begeistert. Vor der Gründung der Boris Gloger Consulting GmbH im Jahr 2008 war der Unternehmer als Business Analyst, Team Leader, Projekt Manager und Scrum Consultant für zahlreiche globale Unternehmen (z.B. EDS, Nokia, BenQ) tätig.
Zum Kundenportfolio der Boris Gloger Consulting GmbH gehören die Scout-Gruppe, Roche PVT, otto.de, Deutsche Post und die Ergo Direkt Versicherung.

Stefan Roock (it-agile) hilft Unternehmen, Führungskräften und Teams dabei, ihre Potenziale zu entfalten - hin zu erfolgreichen Unternehmen, die ihre Kunden und Mitarbeiter begeistern. Er ist davon überzeugt, dass dazu strukturelle, personelle und interpersonelle Themen im Zusammenspiel adressiert werden müssen. Stefan Roock hat seit 1999 agile Ansätze in Deutschland maßgeblich mit verbreitet und weiterentwickelt. Zunächst hat er als Entwickler in agilen Teams, später als Scrum Master/Agile Coach und Product Owner gearbeitet. Heute arbeitet er zusammen mit seinen Kollegen daran, dass Unternehmen langfristig mit agilen Denk- und Arbeitsweisen erfolgreich sind. Dabei fokussiert er auf agile Leadership. Er ist regelmäßiger Sprecher zu agilen Themen auf Konferenzen, bei User Groups und in Unternehmen. Außerdem schreibt er Bücher und Artikel zu agilen Themen
#diverse #social #digital #remote #culture ... Still in Work in Progress
#diverse #social #digital #remote #culture ... Still in Work in Progress

This is a letter from the future: we are working in an organization in a galaxy not so far away … we have a #diverse #social #digital #remote #culture - and we will tell you how we got there. We leave it open to the audience to guess how far this future is away. Or how near they want it to be. Disclaimer: may contain fragments of reality.

Target Audience: Manager, Idealists, Realists, Change Makers
Prerequisites: Open mind
Level: Basic

@moeglichewelten is Anke Nehrenberg’s  twitter handle and philosophy: it integrates what is possible and what is feasible. Connecting people, transforming/enhancing/expanding companies, developing leaders and shaping the digital transformation of organizations is her thing. She wanders the world as a T-shaped non-binary, long-distance runner and mental meta-level.
Gabriela Oropeza is a Full-stack software engineer with over 6 years of experience working in agile remote teams. Her biggest hobby is to travel to new places, get to know new people and try delicious food.
Hannah Shecter is Senior Marketing Manager Global Events at Adform. She is in charge of managing over 20 countries' marketing engagement strategies and organizing Adform’s flagship Global Events. Hannah is originally from Canada but moved to Germany in her early 20s, on the side of her 9-5 job she is also a Content Creator, highlighting ‘Expat Life’ in Germany.
Boris Gloger, Stefan Roock
Anke Nehrenberg, Gabriela Oropeza, Hannah shecter
Boris Gloger, Stefan Roock

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Anke Nehrenberg, Gabriela Oropeza, Hannah shecter
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 5.1
Building a culture of chaos
Building a culture of chaos

Chaos engineering, popularised by Netflix, is an approach to building scalable, resilient systems through destructive experiments, but what other impacts does it have? How can adopting chaos engineering change organisational culture? This talk explores the parallels between modern distributed architectures and the unpredictable challenges of the modern world, and how approaches like chaos engineering help organisations deal with both.

We will deep dive into the practices needed to make chaos engineering a success in your organisation and uncover how they help beyond just chaos engineering experiments. We will also explore the nature of complex, socio-technical systems and why new approaches are needed to deal with them.

Target Audience: Anyone in a team or organisation considering adopting chaos engineering
Prerequisites: None
Level: Practicing

Chaos engineering, culture, learning, complexity, resilience, experimentation, distributed systems
New Normal for Software Engineering
New Normal for Software Engineering

Digitalization has been changing existing industry B2B businesses, digitalization business models arrived and the Digitalization solutions need to be developed to support this. The sudden enforcement of social distancing has given the digital transformation a significant push forward. How do we develop innovative Digitalization offerings in the future? We will show how to seize these opportunities and forge new paths toward the new normal for Software Engineering.

Target Audience: Software Engineers, System and Software Architects, Software Managers
Prerequisites: Knowledge in Software Engineering Practice
Level: Basic

Carolin Rubner leads the research module ‘Development Efficiency & industrial-grade DevOps’ and the research group Decentralized Architectures & Blockchain within Siemens Technology in Erlangen, Germany. She has been working with Siemens across all verticals for 24 years. Her career started as a software architect and project manager specializing in international research and development projects. Prior to her current role, she spent 5 years as Siemens Technical Liaison Manager at Microsoft (Redmond, WA) and worked as a responsible Research Group Lead on the topic of Software Architecture & Platforms in Princeton, NJ.
Christian Hahn is working as Senior Key Expert at Siemens Technology for agile and lean development approaches, continuous testing for DevOps and continuous delivery. He has a strong expertise in test strategies and test techniques for cross-functional teams and in large scale SW development projects.
Matthias Saft is working at Siemens Technology on software development related topics. His focus is code and
design quality, its measurement, visualization, and improvement. A corresponding architectural foundation is
obligatory, and likewise considered. Additionally, he is interested in large scale lean and agile development methodologies, and their application in an industrial context.
Steve Upton
Carolin Rubner, Christian Hahn, Matthias Saft
Carolin Rubner, Christian Hahn, Matthias Saft
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 7.1
Applying AI Methods to Help Users in Fixing Static Analysis Violations
Applying AI Methods to Help Users in Fixing Static Analysis Violations

 The adoption of static analysis of C++ and Java requires that the findings and errors can be prioritised in an efficient way. Our work shows that Machine learning (ML) can support this presentation of static analysis results to end-users. The ML engine learns from the codebase itself, and also observes the violations that the user fixes and which he ignores. The ML uses this to suggest the next best violations to fix, relying on probability of violations to be harmful or most likely to be a noise.

Target Audience: Developer Managers, R&D Managers, Software Architects, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: English, Software development, Coding experience, C++, Java, C#.
Level: Expert

Extended Abstract

Static code analysis is often understood as a mandatory part for checking the source code compliance to government and industry regulations, company-wide guidelines and practices. It can play, however, a more fundamental role in estimating the quality of the code in general, understanding the amount of technical debt, creating the strategy to reduce the amount of technical debt, as well as a helper in making decisions on how to speed up the development by creating a more maintainable, understandable, sociable codebase.

However, by its nature, static code analysis is bound to produce a large amount of noise and false alerts that can distract the team from the actual bugs in the code and prevent them from working thoroughly with the findings. One of the reasons for that is the level of soundness of the static analysis tool. If we want to be sure that the analysis is bound to find all errors in the code, the static analysis tool has to report all possible candidates. The more sound the tool is configured to be, the larger the number of the possible errors is reported, which increases the number of false positives as well.

To improve the user experience of working with static analysis technology, we have developed a machine learning (ML) based approach to presenting the results of the static analysis to users. The ML engine can learn from the code base itself, from a user's preferences, as well as from the interaction within the team. At the code level, our engine learns from the syntactical and semantical structure of the analyzed code to understand which violations are more likely to cause more harm, which violations are more likely to be noise, what underlying problems can be fixed to drastically reduce the number of reported violations. At the user level, the ML engine observes which violations the user fixes and which violations the user ignores. Based on these observations, the ML engine builds a model and uses it to suggest the next best violations to fix.

Igor Kirilenko is VP of Development at Parasoft. He joined Parasoft in 2013, and currently he is responsible for technical strategy, architecture, and development of all products delivered by the company. For the past several years Igor Kirilenko has also been leading the R&D team of highly trained engineers at Parasoft who are focused on research of AI and Machine Learning technologies and creation of new approaches for improvement of accuracy in static analysis findings.
Keeping a Huge Product Database up to Date With State of the Art Machine Learning
Keeping a Huge Product Database up to Date With State of the Art Machine Learning

Maintaining a database containing millions of products can be very challenging, especially when the information you require of these products is subject to changes over time.

We show how we used state of the art Deep Learning methods (such as Transformers, BERT) in connection with smart text matching in order to extract relevant information from free-form text.

We also explain how we leveraged the existing database to create an automatically labelled training dataset.

Our model enables us to continuously update idealos database automatically.

Target Audience:
Decision Makers, Technical Project Leaders, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of machine learning methodology
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract

To maintain idealos product base, product information in the form of values of predefined product attributes needs to be extracted from free-form text product descriptions.

Before the use of a Machine Learning based solution, this process required a lot of manual work to define rules to extract this information. There is also a high effort connected to keeping these rules consistent across the whole database and different types of products, especially since the source of this information (the product descriptions) as well as the required information (the product properties) are subject to changes over time.

In this talk we present a machine learning solution, based on fine tuned state-of-the-art models such as BERT, which is able to extract product information automatically from product descriptions with production-ready performance.

Our solution contains two different models, each following one of the well-known problem settings in Natural Language Processing (NLP): Semantic Segmentation of text (also known as Token Classification) and Question Answering. We will present both models in detail, as well as discussing their advantages and disadvantages for solving the task at hand and how we measured its performance (metrics).

We will also emphasize the importance of identifying aspects of your data that ensure that the developed model can actually fulfill your business needs before curating your dataset.

This highlights another benefit of implementing a Machine Learning model for a huge database: You will get sanity checks of your existing data “for free”, as consistent data is a prerequisite for a successful Machine Learning project.

One problem that is very common in large organisations is that there is often no or only very little training data in the form of labels for specific text sections available. We show how we mitigated this problem by leveraging the existing database to generate a large artificial training dataset. This allowed us to only use a few thousand manually labelled examples for training and testing to reach sufficient performance.

Jan Anderssen (PhD, Linguistics) is Domain Lead Inventory Business at idealo internet GmbH. He has more than 10 years of experience in various product development and leadership roles in e-commerce.
Jona Welsch is Machine Learning Project Lead at dida, where he is responsible for the development of machine learning solutions in the areas of Natural Language Processing and Computer Vision.
Igor Kirilenko
Jan Anderssen, Jona welsch
Igor Kirilenko

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Jan Anderssen, Jona welsch
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 8.1
Quality Engineering Instead of Testing… Why? How?
Quality Engineering Instead of Testing… Why? How?

To continuously deliver IT systems at speed with a focus on business value, high-performance IT delivery teams integrate quality engineering in their way of working.

Quality engineering is the new concept in achieving the right quality of IT systems. Testing only after an IT product was developed is an outdated approach. Built-in quality from the start is needed to guarantee business value in today’s IT delivery models. Quality engineering is about changes in skills, organization, automation and quality measures.

Target Audience: All people involved in high-performance IT delivery teams
Prerequisites: General knowledge of IT delivery
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract

To continuously deliver IT systems at speed with a focus on business value, high-performance cross-functional IT delivery teams integrate quality engineering in their way of working.

Quality engineering is the new concept in achieving the right quality of IT systems. Testing an application only after the digital product has been fully developed has long been a thing of the past. More is needed to guarantee the quality of applications that are delivered faster and more frequently in today’s high-performance IT delivery models. It is about achieving built-in quality. The road to quality engineering means changes in terms of starting points, skills, organization, automation and quality measures.

Our new VOICE model guides teams to align their activities with the business value that is pursued, and by measuring indicators, teams give the right information to stakeholders to establish their confidence that the IT delivery will actually result in business value for the customers.

Teams benefit from the clear definition of QA&Testing topics that are a useful grouping of all activities relevant to quality engineering. Organizing topics are relevant to align activities between teams and performing topics have a focus on the operational activities within a team.

Also, to be able to deliver quality at speed, for today’s teams it is crucial to benefit from automating activities, for example in a CI/CD pipeline, whereby people must remember that automation is not the goal but just a way to increase quality and speed.

In this presentation the audience will learn why a broad view on quality engineering is important and how quality engineering can be implemented to achieve the right quality of IT products, the IT delivery process and the people involved.

This presentation is based on our new book "Quality for DevOps teams" (ISBN 978-90-75414-89-9) which supports high-performance cross-functional teams in implementing quality in their DevOps culture, with practical examples, useful knowledge and some theoretical background.

Rik Marselis is principal quality consultant at Sogeti in the Netherlands. He is a well-appreciated presenter, trainer, author, consultant, and coach in the world of quality engineering. His presentations are always appreciated for their liveliness, his ability to keep the talks serious but light, and his use of practical examples with humorous comparisons.
Rik is a trainer for test design techniques for over 15 years.
Impact Assessment 101 to 301: From Beginner to Journeyman
Impact Assessment 101 to 301: From Beginner to Journeyman

In large software projects the assessment of the impact of a code change can be a cumbersome task. If the software has grown and shows an evolutionary design there are always unwanted side effects.

Change control boards are established. But on what data do they judge what can happen with the changes? Very often there is the HIPPO syndrome which means it is the highest paid person's opinion.

In this talk we will show you ways to come to a deterministic prediction of the impact, what data you need and what you can do with it.

Target Audience:
Architects, Test Managers, Developers, Testers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of collected data in software projects
Level: Advanced

Marco Achtziger is Test Architect at Siemens Healthineers. He has several qualifications from iSTQB/iSQI, is certified Software Architect and trainer for the Test Architect curriculum at Siemens AG.
Gregor Endler holds a doctor's degree in Computer Science for his thesis on completeness estimation of timestamped data. His work at codemanufaktur GmbH deals with Machine Learning and Data Analysis.
Rik Marselis
Marco Achtziger, Gregor Endler
Rik Marselis

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Marco Achtziger, Gregor Endler
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 9.1
Humane On-Call: Alerting Doesn't Have to be Painful
Humane On-Call: Alerting Doesn't Have to be Painful

On-Call is an increasing reality for developers, especially when a site has strict uptime requirements. And sadly, the experience often sucks. It's easy to mandate 24x7 support, it's much harder to set it up in a way that doesn't make the life of the people in the rotation miserable.

I want to talk about improving alerting. I'm focusing on creating high-quality alerts that trigger when they should and don't trigger when nothing is happening. Continuous tuning, automation, and using the right metrics are core parts of this process.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, DevOps, Operators
Prerequisites: Monitoring, operating production software
Level: Advanced

 Extended Abstract

Do you believe in “you build it, you run it”? What if you have on-call rotations, where you are responsible 24x7 for the health of a system? Nothing is quite so infuriating as a collection of poorly structured alerts that trigger randomly.

So, let’s do better! I want to talk about how to improve your monitoring capabilities. There are a few topics I want to touch:

- Reduce the noise

- Automate as much as possible

- Build actionable triggers

- Tune your monitoring constantly

After this talk, you’ll have concrete actions to make your engineers’ life easier when on-call.

Mario Fernandez develops software for a living, and then he goes home and continues thinking about software because he just can't get enough.
He is a full-stack engineer with infrastructure skills. He has led multiple agile delivery teams, being an individual contributor, driving architecture topics, and coaching and supporting other team members.
He believes in high-quality software and advocates for Continuous Delivery, Tes- Driven Development, and quick iteration. He writes and speaks about his experience regularly.
DevOps: the Secrets to Sustainable Innovation
DevOps: the Secrets to Sustainable Innovation

Our world accelerates, innovation cycles get shorter, causing innovation pressure for software companies to deliver their software faster and with high quality. DevOps shows us that delivery speed and quality are no trade-offs. You can have both!

In this talk, we will go on a journey from the beginnings of DevOps to today. We discuss findings of the famous DevOps study, detailed out in the Accelerate book. I make a case, why every company should measure the Four Key Metrics of DevOps and show you different ways to approach this.

Target Audience: Architects, Engineering Managers, Project Leaders, Developers
Prerequisites: You should have worked on at least one IT project or product.
Level: Advanced

Felix Müller is an independent technology and organization consultant, focussing on software architecture. He gained vast experience in distributed software architectures and agile product development by working in Berlin’s tech scene for over a decade. He thinks life is too short to argue endlessly about different architectural styles when you can measure and iterate on them. A bias for action and simplicity is what drives him.
Mario Fernandez
Felix Müller
Mario Fernandez

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Felix Müller
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 1.2
Development and Discovery in Large-Scale Organizations
Development and Discovery in Large-Scale Organizations

The idea of looking at your organization as a single coherent system is tempting, but is it realistic? If it isn't, what does that mean for software developers, and how can we make discoverable what we are developing? This talk looks at organizations as ecosystems rather than as systems, and asks what that difference means for software development. It all boils down to focusing on software as components implementing business capabilities, and how to best capture these capabilities and make them findable and useful as reusable components.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Project Leaders, API Strategists
Prerequisites: API Basics, Large-scale information systems
Level: Advanced

Erik Wilde works in the Axway Catalyst team and focuses on API strategy, API programs, and API platforms. His main goal is to make sure that organizations make the right decisions when it comes to using APIs as the foundation of their digital transformation initiatives. Erik has a Ph.D. from ETH Zurich, is the author of many articles, papers, and books, is a frequent speaker at global API events, and contributes to standardization activities to help improving the way how APIs are designed, managed, and used.
Erik Wilde
Erik Wilde
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 2.2
Stories from a High Performing Team or How to master the Developer Experience
Stories from a High Performing Team or How to master the Developer Experience

Stories from a High Performing Team is a talk about the teamwork in a software development team at ThoughtWorks, a global Tech Consultancy. The team including the speakers - Jennifer (Developer), Xiaofan (Experience Designer) and Ursula (Business Analyst) - have been working for 14 month together which is a rare case in the consultancy business. The team is known for being high performing and today they want to share stories and practices for agile software development teams on how to reach this level.

Target Audience:
Developers, Business Analysts, Architects, Project Managers, Delivery Principals
Prerequisites: Agile Mindset, Modern Softwaredevelopment understanding
Level: Advanced

Ursula Göpfert is a Business Analyst, Product Owner and Delivery Principal at ThoughtWorks. She has gained experience in a wide range of delivery engagements and domains, with a diverse set of teams and clients, co-located and now remote. Ursula enjoys building teams to perform.
Jennifer Parak currently works as a Software Developer at ThoughtWorks. Having started her career working with Microservices in a Java/Spring Boot environment, she recently found herself working with smart ecosystems by complete chance and developed a great passion for it. She’s a passionate advocate for Diversity in Tech and is interested in bridging the gap between hardware and software as well as having more diversity in the industry.
Yan Xiaofan is an Experience Designer at ThoughtWorks. With a background in Human–Machine Interaction, she's always been an Experience Design Strategist driven by the user needs and product strategy. She is a problem solver by using design thinking and value proposition. Xiaofan thrives on user research, product design, interactive design, and service design. Her days are lived in understanding, communication, research, strategy, whiteboard sketches, and test results.
Ursula Göpfert, Jennifer Parak, Xiaofan Yan
Ursula Göpfert, Jennifer Parak, Xiaofan Yan
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 3.2
Words Matter: Promoting Inclusion in Documentation to Build Better User Experience
Words Matter: Promoting Inclusion in Documentation to Build Better User Experience

If any person or groups of people feel unwelcome because of the language being used in a community, its products, or documentation, then the words should change. We can choose words that are precise, not dependent on metaphors, and convey messages without negative connotations.
We will discuss the process of auditing our own work and identifying divisive language. We will also talk about methods to standardize replacements and collaborate with writers and product developers to carry out these changes in a sustainable way.

Target Audience: Content creators (writers, developers, etc.) and management
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Eliane Pereira (she/hers), brazilian immigrant, currently living in Czech Republic, antiracist, antifascist.
Josip Vilicic (he/they), born in Chile, raised in Miami, and now living in Raleigh, North Carolina ("the South"). Antiracist and antifascist activist.
Eliane Pereira, Josip Vilicic
Eliane Pereira, Josip Vilicic
Vortrag: Mi 3.2
Themen: Diversity
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 5.2
An Introduction to Digital Twins – Definition, Applications and Architectures
An Introduction to Digital Twins – Definition, Applications and Architectures

Besides IoT and Machine2Machine communication Digital Twins are a cornerstone of the fourth industrial revolution. In general, a Digital Twin is the virtual replica of a physical object or system. But what does this mean in detail – what are the ingredients of a Digital Twin? How can Digital Twins be built and utilized and what value do they bring? This talk gives an overview of different types of Digital Twins, different applications from public to industrial utilization and architectural approaches how to create and execute them.

Target Audience: System Architects, product owners, software engineers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Tim graduated in 2002 from the TU Munich in Applied Mathematics. After 3 years at a sister company of KUKA Robotics he joined Siemens Technology in 2005. There he researched on new system- and co-simulation methods. In 2014 he became senior key expert for simulation architectures and since then strives to establish simulation in operational support applications for industrial plants & infrastructures. Recently he manages a project that works on a future vision for a Digital-Twin-founded PLM.
Tim Schenk
Tim Schenk
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 9.2
Structural and Advanced Pattern for Kubernetes
Structural and Advanced Pattern for Kubernetes

Due to the capabilities of Kubernetes, the usage of patterns rises to solve complex questions, but causing often confusion and unnecessary implementations. This talk intends to show what are the right scenarios for and for which cases another pattern is more suitable.
In this talk, Max will introduce you to various patterns, often misused by running applications and services within Kubernetes. The focus will be on structural patterns like Sidecars and Ambassadors as well as more advanced patterns like Controller and Operator.

Target Audience: Architects, DevOps Engineers, Platform Teams
Prerequisites: Good Understanding of Kubernetes
Level: Basic

Additional Information:
From this talk, you should take away in which scenario a pattern will suit most likely and how you can implement it. We will also look critically at the usage of these patterns.

Max Körbächer is Co-Founder of Liquid Reply, specialized in Kubernetes, cloud native development and hyper-converged infrastructure. He focuses on crafting cloud agnostic platforms on Kubernetes, solving the application delivery and giving advisory for a cloud native transformation. Since Kubernetes v1.17 he is part of the Kubernetes Release Team.
Max Körbächer
Max Körbächer
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12:00 - 12:45
KeyMi 1
KEYNOTE
KEYNOTE

More information about the OOP keynotes can be found here starting Dec. 15, 2021.

Track: Keynote
Vortrag: KeyMi 1
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15:45 - 16:30
KeyMi 2
KEYNOTE: CUPID - for joyful coding
KEYNOTE: CUPID - for joyful coding

Some codebases are nicer to work with than others. This is true for applications, services, libraries, frameworks, even programming languages themselves. Is this a purely personal choice or are there universal characteristics of software that can make code a joy to work with? Daniel has been thinking about this for a long time, especially since he poked a stick at the SOLID principles for fun a few years ago and people came after him with pitchforks.

Extended Abstract
His recent post about why he feels SOLID is outdated ended up on the front page of Hacker News! Now he has codified his thoughts into his own pithy five-letter acronym, CUPID: Composable, Unix philosophy, Predictable, Idiomatic, Domain-based. Why these characteristics, what do they mean, and why should you care? Can they improve your coding experience or is this just more programmer navel-gazing?

Daniel Terhorst-North uses his deep technical and operational knowledge to help business and technology leaders to optimise digital product organisations. He puts people first and finds simple, pragmatic solutions to business and technical problems, often using lean and agile techniques. With thirty years of experience in IT, Daniel is a frequent speaker at technology and business conferences worldwide. The originator of Behaviour-Driven Development (BDD) and Deliberate Discovery, Daniel has published feature articles in numerous software and business publications, and contributed to “The RSpec Book: Behaviour Driven Development with RSpec, Cucumber, and Friends” and “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts”. He occasionally blogs at https://dannorth.net/blog.
Daniel Terhorst-North
Daniel Terhorst-North
Track: Keynote
Vortrag: KeyMi 2
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17:00 - 18:00
Mi 2.4
D.A.R.E. more, F.E.A.R. less – Put your Leadership in ACTion With Pen & Paper
D.A.R.E. more, F.E.A.R. less – Put your Leadership in ACTion With Pen & Paper

Are you wondering: How is a diary connected with leadership? How can YOU and OTHERS benefit from written reflection?

In this session you will get answers! You will benefit from my extensive (business) journaling experience. You will be introduced to psychological science that makes written self-reflection so powerful.

You want to change habits in your life's "departments"?
You want to harvest outstanding outcomes - at work and beyond?
You want to spark change - in yourself and others?
Then join and get your leadership in ACTion!

Target Audience: All curious human beings (including Developers, Architects, Managers, Project Leads)
Prerequisites: Openness for new ways of thinking (and behaviour) is helpful
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract

During my career in IT and people development I had several turning points where I either was made to use journaling techniques or experimented with them myself to successfully tackle the next challenge.

Over the years some turning points "beyond business" in life followed. Also I got serious scientific foundations in my psychological studies. Having both - the science and my experience - I started reflecting, why those 'written self-reflection' techniques are so powerful and – at the same time – they are still quite rarely used in the business context.

This session is suitable for all humans: curious newcomers as well as seasoned written-self-reflection experts as I'll share some stories, more tha

Cosima Laube is an experienced independent coach, consultant and trainer with a proven track record in a variety of industries (automotive, finance & banking, healthcare, travel & tourism, public sector).
Having a strong background as developer and people lead in software engineering, over the last 10+ years, Cosima enhanced her portfolio with solid coaching skills and university studies focused on I/O and Health Psychology. Her credo at work and in life is: Achieving MORE - together!
Cosima Laube
Cosima Laube
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17:00 - 18:00
Mi 5.4
"Shaping Transformative Experiences" – opportunities and how the pandemic has has been a catalyst
"Shaping Transformative Experiences" – opportunities and how the pandemic has has been a catalyst

Leaders of innovation, business and tech are experiencing an unprecedented demand to accelerate the pace of digital transformation. From board rooms to kindergarten classrooms, the unexpected upheaval triggered by the onset of the pandemic saw organizations make drastic changes. In this talk, Layla will share how we can learn from our transformations of past industrial revolutions, how shifts in human behavior help inform opportunities and how we can best consider interventions and take action.

Target Audience: Strategists, Product Owners, Designers, Technologists, Developers, Architects, Managers, - everyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Leaders of innovation, business and tech are experiencing an unprecedented demand to accelerate the pace of digital transformation. From board rooms to kindergarten classrooms, the unexpected upheaval triggered by the onset of the pandemic saw organizations make drastic changes. What for some was previously believed to be a process anticipating to take years, or met with resistance or incremental change, happened in months, weeks or even days.

We now have the amazing opportunity to shape our future rather than to react to it. Pandemic affects and evolving needs are converging to drive development towards innovative solutions. We need to build new capabilities towards helping organizations adopt new skills and shape new products and solutions – and simultaneously, we need to make different choices about where to focus efforts and initiatives. While no one can predict future moments of opportunity, or how technology will impact our lives on the short and long term, with certainty, we know opportunities will continue to come.

In this talk, Layla will share how we can learn from our transformations of past industrial revolutions, how shifts in human behavior help inform opportunities and how we can best consider interventions and take action.

Layla is a partner leading Prophet’s Experience + Innovation Practice in EMEA where she shapes signature experiences that connect people with the brands they love.
Born in Germany and equally at home in New York, Layla has 25+ years of defining, designing and launching innovative products and solutions in markets across US, Europe, Middle East and China. Guided by a human centered design approach, she draws inspiration from working with people who are optimistic, take license and enjoy elevating our experiences.
Layla’s multi-disciplinary teams have designed beautiful and complex systems of service and product for connected car, future mobility, IoT (consumer and industry), telecommunication, learning and future cities for clients such as BMW, Volkswagen, IKEA, China UnionPay, Deutsche Telekom, AT&T, o2 Telefonica, Saudi Telekom, Samsung, Siemens, General Electric, the 9/11 Memorial Museum, and other leading brands. She has spoken recently on these topics at the Business Design Talks Gdynia, InnoTrans Berlin (on the future of mobility), Technical University Munich, University of St. Gallen, Lucerne University
Layla Keramat
Layla Keramat
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17:00 - 18:00
Mi 9.4
Clean Infrastructure as Code
Clean Infrastructure as Code

The clean code principles are well-known in modern, agile software development. But what has become the default for our business code, unfortunately by no means applies to our infrastructure code. Instead, we find badly crafted, complicated and highly tangled code that is manually tested using a trial and error approach. However, for modern cloud based systems the infrastructure code plays a crucial role. So it's about time we begin to treat it as a 1st class citizen! This hands-on session shows how to craft clean infrastructure as code.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, DevOps Engineers, SREs
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of infrastructure as code practices and tools
Level: Advanced

Mario-Leander Reimer is a passionate developer,. proud father,. #CloudNativeNerd. Leander works as a principal software architect at QAware. He is continuously looking for innovations in software engineering and ways to combine and apply state-of-the-art technology in real-world projects.
Mario-Leander Reimer
Mario-Leander Reimer
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmi 2
Data Technical Debt: Looking Beyond Code
Data Technical Debt: Looking Beyond Code

Data technical debt refers to quality challenges associated with legacy data sources, including both mission-critical sources of record as well as “big data” sources of insight. Data technical debt impedes the ability of your organization to leverage information effectively for better decision making, increases operational costs, and impedes your ability to react to changes in your environment. The annual cost of bad data is in the trillions of dollars, this problem is real and it won't go away on its own.

Target Audience: Developers, Data Professionals, Managers, Architects
Prerequisites: Understanding of basic data terms
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract

Data technical debt refers to quality challenges associated with legacy data sources, including both mission-critical sources of record as well as “big data” sources of insight. Data technical debt impedes the ability of your organization to leverage information effectively for better decision making, increases operational costs, and impedes your ability to react to changes in your environment. Bad data is estimated to cost the United States $3 trillion annually alone, yet few organizations have a realistic strategy in place to address data technical debt.

This presentation defines what data technical debt is and why it is often a greater issue than classic code-based technical debt. We describe the types of data technical debt, why each is important, and how to measure them. Most importantly, this presentation works through Disciplined Agile (DA) strategies for avoiding, removing, and accepting data technical debt. Data is the lifeblood of our organizations, we need to ensure that it is clean if we’re to remain healthy.

Learning objectives:

• Discover what data technical debt is

• Understand the complexities of data technical debt and why they’re difficult to address

• Learn technical and management strategies to address data technical debt

Scott Ambler is the Vice President, Chief Scientist of Disciplined Agile at Project Management Institute. Scott leads the evolution of the Disciplined Agile (DA) tool kit and is an international keynote speaker. Scott is the (co)-creator of the Disciplined Agile (DA) tool kit as well as the Agile Modeling (AM) and Agile Data (AD) methodologies.
Scott W. Ambler
Scott W. Ambler
Vortrag: Nmi 2
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18:30 - 20:00
Nmi 5
The Future Starts Here
The Future Starts Here

Who drove your digital transformation? Your CEO? Or COVID-19? Across workplaces, markets and everyday habits, the pandemic transformed our world beyond our control. The way that we work, what we work on, even why we work were all transformed in ways that few organisational transformation programs ever achieved. Software played a key role in this transformation and, for better or for worse, it runs the world. We will explore the changes to the way we live that have moved from possibilities to realities and from opportunities to responsibilities.

Target Audience: Everyone interested in Digitalization
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Who drove your digital transformation? Your CEO? CTO? Or COVID-19? Across workplaces, markets and everyday habits, the pandemic transformed our world beyond our control. But for the parts we were able to control, software and technology played key roles. The way that we work, what we work on and even why we work were all transformed in ways that few organisational transformation programs ever achieved.

For better or for worse, software runs the world, and with great power comes great responsibility. Software has always been at the forefront of communication and distributed working, from the invention of the email to the current internet landscape, from social media to making socially distanced work a practical reality. Of course, it's not all good and things have not always turned out the way technologists expected. In this session we will explore the changes to the way we live that have moved from possibilities to realities and from opportunities to responsibilities.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer, reviewer, and trainer. His development interests are in programming, people and practice. He is co-author of “A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing” and “On Patterns and Pattern Languages”, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series, and editor of “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” and co-editor of “97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know”.
Frank Buschmann ist Senior Principal Engineer bei Siemens Corporate Technology in München. Dort erforscht er moderne Software-Architektur und Entwicklungsansätze für die industrielle Digitalisierung. Die Produktentwicklung unterstützt Frank bei der effizienten Anwendung dieser Technologien. Seine aktuellen Forschungsschwerpunkte sind Architekturen für Cyber-Physikalische Systeme, das Internet of Things, Intelligente Systeme sowie industrielles DevOps. Frank ist Co-Autor von vier Bänden der von John Wiley & Sons veröffentlichten 'Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture'.
Kevlin Henney, Frank Buschmann
Kevlin Henney, Frank Buschmann
Vortrag: Nmi 5
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, (Donnerstag, 03.Februar 2022)
09:00 - 10:45
Do 3.1
Software Quality is Not Only About Code and Tests
Software Quality is Not Only About Code and Tests

Each project has its own unique technology stack, different business logic and a unique team. The definition of quality in our projects can vary greatly. However, there are good practices that will work everywhere. There are steps that can be taken in every project and team to produce the software of better quality. I will tell you how to improve communication and processes, and what tools we can use not to be ashamed of the fruits of our work. Everything from a programmer's perspective.

Target Audience: Developers and Tech/Project Leaders
Prerequisites: Some experience in profesional software development
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Each project has its own unique technology stack, different business logic and a unique team. Some of us work on mature products that have been in production for many years. Others are constantly struggling to innovate in the race against time. The definition of quality in our projects can vary greatly. However, there are good practices that will work everywhere. There are steps that can be taken in every project and team to produce the software of better quality. I will tell you how to improve communication and processes, and what tools we can use not to be ashamed of the fruits of our work. Everything from a programmer's perspective.

Aleksandra Kunysz has been creating software for years. She has experience in full stack programming, testing, requirements gathering, and conducting trainings. She has worked in corporations, startups and pro bono in various industries and countries. Not only that, but she also enjoys solving problems and writing meaningful code. Since 2019, she has been advocating quality among programmers. When she's offline, she rides two wheels, walks her dog, or practices yoga.
TDD Misconceptions
TDD Misconceptions

“TDD is when you write tests before implementing the business logic” - a simple sentence that is also often misunderstood.
Moving from one project to another, I have observed how many times people were terrified of TDD. I have been there too.
This session will focus on trying to understand HOW and more importantly WHY you should consider TDD. I've transformed failures from my experience into a series of lessons learned, things that in hindsight should have been obvious.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in testing techniques
Level: Basic

Olena Borzenko is a full-stack developer at The Adecco Group from Berlin in Germany. She has previously worked in a service company based in Ukraine and took a part in the creation of various products from small startups, B2B applications, to enterprise platforms.
Moreover, she is passionate about new technologies, clean code, and best practices.
In her free time, when she’s not spending it on hobbies, she likes to build demos around real-life use cases, share knowledge with others, and the opposite, learn about someone else's experience.

Aleksandra Kunysz
Olena Borzenko
Aleksandra Kunysz

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Olena Borzenko
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09:00 - 10:45
Do 5.1
Sustainability in Software Engineering - or how to fight climate change as a software engineer
Sustainability in Software Engineering - or how to fight climate change as a software engineer

In this talk, we will give an overview about all the different aspects that affect climate change from the software engineering perspective and discuss a number of concrete actions that every software engineer can take (and should keep in mind day-in day-out) to help fight climate change. During the talk, we will not only provide an overview of the landscape, but also cover topics in more depth and discuss the challenges that come with them.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leads
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
In this talk, we will give an overview about all the different aspects that affect climate change from the software engineering perspective and discuss a number of concrete actions that every software engineer can take (and should keep in mind day-in day-out) to help fight climate change, including:

  • Energy consumption of software and what that means for software engineering
  • Research studies about software running in data centers and the problem of zombies
  • Work towards operating software in a carbon-aware way
  • When and how far do renewable energies help
  • How does carbon offsetting works and how to select the right projects
  • And more...
Martin leads the work on development environments for Spring and Spring Boot and is Sustainability Ambassador at VMware.
It's Coming! The Revolutionary Effect Of Climate on Architecture
It's Coming! The Revolutionary Effect Of Climate on Architecture

In 2020, the three big cloud providers signed us all up for a revolution in the way we write and operate software. The deadline is 2030. Are you ready?

Target Audience: General techie. This works for all
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
In 2020, Google Cloud, AWS, and Azure all committed to be carbon zero by 2030. It's the incredibly tough goal of zero emitted carbon as a result for operating our applications and services. They can't do it alone. AWS says "we optimize for sustainability of the cloud, while customers are responsible for sustainability in the cloud, meaning they must optimize their workloads and resource utilization." I don't think this is a request. They've signed up to be carbon zero by 2030. That means we have too. The clock is ticking.

Anne Currie has been in the tech industry for nearly 30 years. In the 90's she worked on high performance backend infrastructure. In the 00's on ecommerce, and in the 10's on cutting edge ops. The 20's is all about climate.
Martin Lippert
Anne Currie
Anne Currie
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 5.2
The perceived loss of control: How UX can help to understand AI
The perceived loss of control: How UX can help to understand AI

With AI entering more and more aspects of our lives, scepticism and worries towards this technology are increasing too. Empathy towards basic human needs and a great User Experience can help AI being more widely accepted and used.
But how to get there?
After covering basic UX principles, the talk will deep dive into the fields of trust, transparency and explainable AI.
The goal is to outline a path to a fruitful collaboration and mutual understanding between humans and AI.

Target Audience: Software Engineers, Data Scientists, Product Owners, Researchers, Designers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Jan is an experienced Freelance UX Designer and loves to explore what design and technology can do for humanity. Artificial intelligence, Algorithms and Ethics are a big part of that exploration and have been fascinating him for a couple of years. Across his professional experience, he collaborated with large companies, consultancies and a startup specialised in the AI/ML sector. In his free time, he spends time on bicycles or enjoys books. In both cases, he owns too many of them :)
Jan Korsanke
Jan Korsanke
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 8.2
What Do You Mean?
What Do You Mean?

The world in which a software system lives is filled with meaning. The structure, concepts and names that inform the code, its changes and the mental models held by developers are expressions of meaning. The very act of development is an exercise in meaning — it's discovery, its formulation, its communication.
But just because we are immersed in concepts of meaning from an early age, and just because the daily work of software development is about wrangling meaning, that doesn't mean we're necessarily good at it. Let's talk about what we mean.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, UX, Product Owners
Prerequisites: No specific prerequisites
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
"It's just semantics." How many conversations about philosophy, politics and programming are derailed by this thought-stopping comment?
Semantics is all about meaning. If there is one thing we struggle with and need to get better at, it is the search for and clarification of meaning. The world in which a software system lives is filled with meaning. The structure, concepts and names that inform the code, its changes and the mental models held by developers are expressions of meaning. The very act of development is an exercise in meaning — it's discovery, its formulation, its communication. Paradigms, processes and practices are anchored in different ways of thinking about and arriving at meaning.
But just because we are immersed in concepts of meaning from an early age, and just because the daily work of software development is about wrangling meaning, and just because it's just semantics, that doesn't mean we're necessarily good at it. It takes effort and insight. Let's talk about what we mean.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer, reviewer, and trainer. His development interests are in programming, people and practice. He is co-author of “A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing” and “On Patterns and Pattern Languages”, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series, and editor of “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” and co-editor of “97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know”.
Kevlin Henney
Kevlin Henney
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 9.2
Revolutionize DevOps with ML capabilities. Introduction to Amazon CodeGuru and DevOps Guru
Revolutionize DevOps with ML capabilities. Introduction to Amazon CodeGuru and DevOps Guru

I will introduce two AWS services: CodeGuru and DevOps Guru.
CodeGuru Reviewer uses ML and automated reasoning to automatically identify critical issues, security vulnerabilities, and hard-to-find bugs during application development.
DevOps Guru analyzes data like application metrics, logs, events, and traces to establish baseline operational behavior and then uses ML to detect anomalies. It does this by having the ability to correlate and group metrics together to understand the relationships between those metrics, so it knows when to alert.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of the code quality metrics and observability
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract
In this talk I will introduce two AWS services: CodeGuru and DevOps Guru.
Code reviews are one example and are important to improve software quality, software security, and increase knowledge transfer in the teams working with critical code bases. Amazon CodeGuru Reviewer uses ML and automated reasoning to automatically identify critical issues, security vulnerabilities, and hard-to-find bugs during application development. CodeGuru Reviewer also provides recommendations to developers on how to fix issues to improve code quality and dramatically reduce the time it takes to fix bugs before they reach customer-facing applications and result in a bad experience
Amazon DevOps Guru analyzes data like application metrics, logs, events, and traces to establish baseline operational behavior and then uses ML to detect anomalies. The service uses pre-trained ML models that are able to identify spikes in application requests. It does this by having the ability to correlate and group metrics together to understand the relationships between those metrics, so it knows when to alert and when not to.

Vadym Kazulkin is Head of Development at ip.labs GmbH, a 100% subsidiary of the FUJIFLM Group, based in Bonn. ip.labs is the world's leading white label e-commerce software imaging company. Vadym has been involved with the Java ecosystem for over 20 years. His current focus and interests include the design and implementation of highly scalable and available solutions, Serverless and AWS Cloud. Vadym is the co-organizer of the Java User Group Bonn and Serverless Bonn Meetup, and a frequent speaker at various Meetups and conferences.
Vadym Kazulkin
Vadym Kazulkin
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12:00 - 12:45
KeyDo 1
KEYNOTE
KEYNOTE

More information about the OOP keynotes can be found here starting Dec. 15, 2021.

Track: Keynote
Vortrag: KeyDo1
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14:30 - 15:30
Do 5.3
Monolith To Microservices
Monolith To Microservices

Big Bang rebuilds of systems are so 20th century. With our users expecting new functionality to be shipped more frequently than ever before, we no longer have the luxury of a complete system rebuild. In fact, a big bang migration of a monolithic architecture into a microservice architecture can be especially problematic, as we’ll explore in this talk.

We want to ship features, but we also want to improve our architecture, and for many of us this means breaking down existing systems into microservices. But how do you do this while still regularly releasing new features?

In this talk, I’ll share with you some key principles and a number of patterns which you can use to incrementally decompose an existing system into microservices. I’ll also cover off patterns that can work to migrate functionality out of systems you can’t change, which are useful when working with very old systems or vendor products. We'll look at the use of strangler patterns, change data capture, database decomposition and more.

Coming out of this talk you’ll have a better understanding of the importance of evolving an architecture, along with some concrete patterns to help you do that on your own projects.

Target Audience: Developers, architects, operations, testers and anyone actively involved in software delivery
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge about microservices and software delivery
Level: Advanced

Sam is a technologist and consultant who focuses in the areas of cloud, continuous delivery and microservices. As well as helping companies all over the world get software into production, Sam is also an experienced conference speaker and writer. He is author of Building Microservices, 1st Edition (O’Reilly, 2015), Monolith To Microservices (O’Reilly, 2019), and Building Microservices, 2nd Edition (O’Reilly, 2021).
Sam Newman
Sam Newman
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14:30 - 15:30
Do 6.3
The CTO Guide on How to Build a Successful Product Development Organization
The CTO Guide on How to Build a Successful Product Development Organization

This talk describes how to build and run a successful product development organization that delivers business value, not just features. I will cover what makes effective product development teams, how to structure, loosely couple, align and choreograph them, especially in larger organisations with up to 100 teams. Methods I will talk about include OKRs and Kanban Flight Levels. In this context I will also show when and how decentralised product teams can benefit from centralised platforms.

Target Audience: CTO, Manager, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Experience with software development at scale
Level: Advanced

Matthias Patzak is a Principal Advisor at Amazon Web Services. Before joining Amazon Web Services, Matthias was Vice President IT at AutoScout24 and Chief Digital Officer at Home Shopping Europe. In both companies he introduced lean-agile operational models at scale and lead successful cloud transformations resulting in shorter delivery times and increased business value.
14:30 - 15:30
Do 8.3
Collaborative Modelling Domain Boundaries
Collaborative Modelling Domain Boundaries

Within DDD we have the perspective of strategic design where we can split a large-system into multiple sub-domains, each having its purpose and responsibilities, where teams can work in autonomous, clean bounded contexts. One of the most effective ways to define these boundaries is by collaborative modelling with all the stakeholders involved in these domains. Join us were we share war stories about our experience doing collaborative modelling in several companies with 30+ people.

Target Audience: Architects, Manager, Decision Makers, Tech Leads
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
As a business, we want to make sure our software can handle changes when the business changes. We want to define boundaries that support the flow of the business value. Within Domain-Driven Design we have the perspective of strategic design. A perspective where we can split a large-system into multiple sub-domains, each having its purpose and responsibilities. Within these sub-domains, teams can work in autonomous, clean bounded contexts. One of the most effective ways to define these boundaries is by collaborative modelling with all the stakeholders involved in these domains. But that poses real challenges: What exactly is the definition of a (sub)domain? What is problem space? How can we form a common language of these boundaries? How does a customer journey fit in? And how do you decide and come to a single model in a large group, where everyone shares that same model on a high level?
Join us in this talk where we will show and tell war stories about our experience of having done collaborative modelling in several companies. We will tell our successes, but more importantly our failures and what we learned from them. What are the key heuristics we think that makes a collaborative modelling session with 30+ people, without any DDD knowledge, succeed? What are the skills we need to learn to facilitate it, and how can we make a company not dependent on us as consultants to continue their journey? You will leave with the knowledge of how to start your own collaborative modelling of your domain boundaries. We tell you our definition of (sub)domains, problems and solution space, and how we explained it to the companies we consulted. Providing you with new perspectives on how to embed this as a ritual in your company.

Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
Successful software delivery organizations can balance investments in people and technology. As a strategic software delivery consultant, Paul de Raaij is coaching leadership in designing and evolving the best environment for employees to thrive in. Using a mixture of social sciences, technology and management knowledge to bring new perspectives to our clients given their context.
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Paul de Raaij
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Paul de Raaij
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15:45 - 16:30
KeyDo 2
KEYNOTE: Who Will Lead in the Algorithmic Age?
KEYNOTE: Who Will Lead in the Algorithmic Age?

For most people, AI means robots taking human jobs or China’s surveillance of its citizens. Despite the hype around it and its image of progress, the real workings of artificial intelligence are not widely understood. Companies are already implementing a web of algorithms to optimize manual business processes. Most of the time, the larger IT organization is not included on the journey. This talk is an overview of how IT leaders can center the development of human teams in a world that is increasingly optimized by algorithms.

Nakeema Stefflbauer
Nakeema Stefflbauer
Track: Keynote
Vortrag: KeyDo 2
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17:00 - 18:00
Do 3.4
Good Fences Make Good Neighbours
Good Fences Make Good Neighbours

When breaking up our software into modules we all too often forget the important social aspects; how the design affects the teams. We need modules that not only make us efficient but also harmonious.
We know that good fences make good neighbours, but only when the boundaries are placed correctly. We are going to take a closer look at why modularity is needed, what it actually can do for us, and how we can increase our chances of getting it right by taking a systems thinking approach.

Target Audience: Software Architects, Developers, Systems Designer
Prerequisites: None
Level: Expert

Extended Abstract

Modularity is a key aspect of software and architectural design, setting explicit boundaries between different parts of the system. But we have been banging on about this since the 70s, and still we are creating big balls of mud -- now even the distributed kind. Either modularity as a concept is insufficient or maybe there are aspects here we seem to get wrong. We know that good fences make good neighbours, but only when the boundaries are placed correctly. How can we create robust and sustainable modular designs when identifying those boundaries are so challenging?
In this talk, we are going to take a closer look at why modularity is needed, what it actually can do for us, and how we can increase our chances of getting it right by taking a systems thinking approach. The claim made is that a holistic view of the problem space is critical; one that considers all its parts, including the business and all the people affected. Software development today is inherently a sociotechnical endeavour and any modularisation effort, be it information hiding, SOA, microservices, DDD, Team Topologies and more, must take this into account in order to be able to create solutions that are sustainable and have the necessary conceptual integrity.
In summary, this talk will help you piece together all of the these good modularisation practices and understand the theory behind them, improving your holistic system design skills, and enabling you to create requisite coherence in your designs. Maybe this will guard you against the dreaded distributed big ball of mud, the killer of agility and productive collaboration.

Trond Hjorteland is an IT architect and aspiring sociotechnical systems designer from the consulting firm Scienta.no and has many years experience with large, complex, and business critical systems, primarily as a developer and architect on middleware and backend applications. His main interests are service-orientation, domain-driven design, event-driven architectures, and sociotechnical systems, working in industries like telecom, media, TV, and public sector. Mantra: Great products emerge from collaborative design.
Trond Hjorteland
Trond Hjorteland
Vortrag: Do 3.4
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17:00 - 18:00
Do 5.4
Security Engineering for Machine Learning
Security Engineering for Machine Learning

Machine Learning appears to have made impressive progress on many tasks from image classification to autonomous vehicle control and more. ML has become so popular that its application, though often poorly understood and partially motivated by hype, is exploding. This is not necessarily a good thing. Systematic risk is invoked by adopting ML in a haphazard fashion. Understanding and categorizing security engineering risks introduced by ML at design level is critical. This talk focuses on results of an architectural risk analysis of ML systems.

Target Audience: Architects, Technical Leads, and Developers and Security Engineers of ML Systems
Prerequisites: Risk Managers, Software Security Professionals, ML Practitioners, everyone who is confronted by ML
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Machine Learning appears to have made impressive progress on many tasks including image classification, machine translation, autonomous vehicle control, playing complex games including chess, Go, and Atari video games, and more. This has led to much breathless popular press coverage of Artificial Intelligence, and has elevated deep learning to an almost magical status in the eyes of the public. ML, especially of the deep learning sort, is not magic, however. ML has become so popular that its application, though often poorly understood and partially motivated by hype, is exploding. In my view, this is not necessarily a good thing. I am concerned with the systematic risk invoked by adopting ML in a haphazard fashion. Our research at the Berryville Institute of Machine Learning (BIIML) is focused on understanding and categorizing security engineering risks introduced by ML at the design level. Though the idea of addressing security risk in ML is not a new one, most previous work has focused on either particular attacks against running ML systems (a kind of dynamic analysis) or on operational security issues surrounding ML. This talk focuses on the results of an architectural risk analysis (sometimes called a threat model) of ML systems in general. A list of the top five (of 78 known) ML security risks will be presented.

Gary McGraw is co-founder of the Berryville Institute of Machine Learning. He is a globally recognized authority on software security and the author of eight best selling books on this topic. His titles include Software Security, Exploiting Software, Building Secure Software, Java Security, Exploiting Online Games, and 6 other books; and he is editor of the Addison-Wesley Software Security series. Dr. McGraw has also written over 100 peer-reviewed scientific publications. Gary serves on the Advisory Boards of Irius Risk, Maxmyinterest, Runsafe Security, and Secure Code Warrior. He has also served as a Board member of Cigital and Codiscope (acquired by Synopsys) and as Advisor to CodeDX (acquired by Synopsys), Black Duck (acquired by Synopsys), Dasient (acquired by Twitter), Fortify Software (acquired by HP), and Invotas (acquired by FireEye). Gary produced the monthly Silver Bullet Security Podcast for IEEE Security & Privacy magazine for thirteen years. His dual PhD is in Cognitive Science and Computer Science from Indiana University where he serves on the Dean’s Advisory Council for the Luddy School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering.
Gary McGraw
Gary McGraw
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17:00 - 18:00
Do 7.4
Technical Debt: A Management Problem That Requires a Management Solution
Technical Debt: A Management Problem That Requires a Management Solution

The primary cause of technical debt in your organization is very likely your project managers – not your programmers nor your architects. In this keynote Scott Ambler explores the root causes of technical debt within organizations, many of which trace back to the project management (PM) mindset and the strategies that result from it. Scott works through how to make leadership aware of technical debt and its implications, how to evolve your management practices, and strategies to embed technical debt thinking and behaviors into your culture.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Leaders, Managers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
The primary cause of technical debt in your organization is very likely your project managers – not your programmers nor your architects. The management desire to be “on time and on budget”  often motivates deployment of poor-quality assets and rarely leaves room for investment in long-term quality. Although technical professionals may readily realize this problem managers often do not, or if they do they don’t view technical debt as a priority. It is time for a change.
In this keynote Scott Ambler explores the root causes of technical debt within organizations, many of which trace back to the project management (PM) mindset and the strategies that result from it. Just like the technical challenges of addressing technical debt must be addressed by technical solutions, the management challenges of technical debt must be addressed by management solutions. Scott works through how to make leadership aware of technical debt and its implications, how to evolve your management practices to avoid and address technical debt, and enterprise-level strategies to embed technical debt thinking and behaviors into your culture. Results from industry research will be shared throughout.
Learning objectives:
• Connect project management practices to their impact on technical debt
• Learn how to describe technical debt, its impact, and solutions to leadership
• Discover how to embed technical debt thinking and practices throughout your way of working (WoW)

Scott Ambler is the Vice President, Chief Scientist of Disciplined Agile at Project Management Institute. Scott leads the evolution of the Disciplined Agile (DA) tool kit and is an international keynote speaker. Scott is the (co)-creator of the Disciplined Agile (DA) tool kit as well as the Agile Modeling (AM) and Agile Data (AD) methodologies.
Scott W. Ambler
Scott W. Ambler
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, (Freitag, 04.Februar 2022)
09:00 - 16:00
Fr 1
Paradigms Lost, Paradigms Regained: Programming with Objects and Functions and More
Paradigms Lost, Paradigms Regained: Programming with Objects and Functions and More

It is very easy to get stuck in one way of doing things. This is as true of programming as it is of life. Although a programming paradigm represents a set of stylistic choices, it is much more than this: a programming paradigm also represents a way of thinking. It represents a set of patterns of problem framing and solving and contains the ingredients of software architecture.

This session explores the strengths and weaknesses of different programming styles, patterns and paradigms across different programming languages, past and present.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: Programming experience
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
It is very easy to get stuck in one way of doing things. This is as true of programming as it is of life. Although a programming paradigm represents a set of stylistic choices, it is much more than this: a programming paradigm also represents a way of thinking. Having only way to think about problems is too limiting. A programming paradigm represents a set of patterns of problem framing and solving and contains the ingredients of software architecture. As Émile Auguste Chartier noted, there is nothing more dangerous than an idea when you have only one idea.

Perhaps even more problematic than being stuck with a narrow view of paradigms, is being stuck with a dysfunctional view of each paradigm. For instance, many developers working in languages and frameworks that support object orientation have a strong idea of the principles of interaction, data abstraction and granularity that support an effective view of OO, and instead surround themselves with manager objects, singletons and DTOs.

This session explores the strengths and weaknesses of different programming styles, patterns and paradigms across different programming languages, past and present.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer, reviewer, and trainer. His development interests are in programming, people and practice. He is co-author of “A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing” and “On Patterns and Pattern Languages”, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series, and editor of “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” and co-editor of “97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know”.
Kevlin Henney
Kevlin Henney
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09:00 - 16:00
Fr 3
Limitiert Facilitating Collaborative Design Decisions
Facilitating Collaborative Design Decisions

If we want to make sustainable design decisions for our architecture that are embraced by everyone, the most effective way is to do this collaboratively. It is hard to do because we need to deal with all sorts of group dynamics that cause people to stop sharing what they want, ending up in resistance behaviour from sarcastic jokes, to stopped communication. So how can we make collaborative design decisions better? Join us in this hands-on workshop where we explore different models of decision making.

Maximum number of participants: 24

Target Audience: Architects, Managers, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Expert

Extended Abstract
If we want to make sustainable design decisions for our architecture that are embraced by everyone, the most effective way is to do this collaboratively. Everyone can feel a part of the decision, and can potentially give the input they have. The group is aligned and knows what is to be expected onward. On paper this sounds great, but in reality we know it is hard to do because we need to deal with all sorts of group dynamics. Dynamics like cultural differences, conflicts of opinions, cognitive biases, and polarities that the group are part of. These dynamics cause people to stop sharing what they want, which ends up in resistance behaviour from sarcastic jokes, to stopped communication or leaving the session. No wonder a lot of people resort to a more autocratic form of decision making, where the architect analyzes and makes the decision. So how can we make collaborative design decisions better?

Join Gien, Evelyn and Kenny in this hands-on workshop where we explore different models of decision making that can help facilitate collaborative design decisions. We will dive into a variety of facilitation techniques such as:

  • Working with climate reports to trigger hidden group conflicts
  • Visualising trade-offs of different models with the pro-con-fix list
  • Taking group decisions with full buy in with Deep Democracy
Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
Gien Verschatse, a software developer with 10 years of experience, mainly in a .NET environment, who likes to start her day with coffee. She specialises in bridging the gap between users and developers by practicing domain driven design. Besides that she loves to learn how teams can improve the way they make decisions both on a technical and organisational level. She is a strong believer of continuously learning by deliberate practice and knowledge sharing, which is why she dedicates a lot of her free time speaking at conferences or user groups.She also helps to organise an F# conference in the US, Open FSharp. When she is not busy with all of the above, you will find her on the sofa, reading a book (yes, with coffee).
Evelyn van Kelle is a strategic software delivery consultant, with experience in coaching, advising and guiding organisations and teams in designing socio-technical systems.
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Gien Verschatse, Evelyn van Kelle
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Gien Verschatse, Evelyn van Kelle
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09:00 - 16:00
Fr 7
Embrace Uncertainty, And Reality Will Hug You Back
Embrace Uncertainty, And Reality Will Hug You Back

We live in an uncertain world that seems to shift and transform by the second. How can our software teams ever be effective when the ground is shifting below their feet?

While the discomfort of uncertainty and chaos may well make us feel uncomfortable, even fearful. It's precisely where the value in most of our projects lies.

In this session we'll explore how to embrace uncertainty and deliver the right things at the right time. Even when it seems hard to pin down what the right thing is and when it's needed!

Target Audience: Agile Coaches, Product Managers, Product Owners, Project Managers
Prerequisites: Some experience with the application of agility to a team or organisation.
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
We liv in an uncertain world that seems to shift and transform by the second. How can our software teams ever be effective when the ground is shifting below their feet?

While the discomfort of uncertainty and chaos may well make us feel uncomfortable, even fearful. It's precisely where the value in most of our projects lies.

In this session we'll explore how to embrace uncertainty and deliver the right things at the right time. Even when it seems hard to pin down what the right thing is and when it's needed!

  • How to make your work board (virtual or real) a tool to support group problem solving and collaboration.
  • How to use story mapping to plan work and understand the level of uncertainty.
  • How to use projections to help with prioritisation and planning.
  • Why having a language to discuss uncertainty is so important.
  • This tutorial is for anyone wanting to better prioritise their teams' work, respond effectively to an ever changing environment and deliver value.
John Le Drew has spent most of the last 2 decades working in the software industry, with a focus on web echnologies. After 10 years as a software engineer John moved into consultancy where he quickly learned the value of team dynamics and how most technical challenges are projecting underlying issues with collaboration. So his focus shifted, while still being very involved technically, his first focus is on facilitating a safe, creative, collaborative environment.
John Le Drew
John Le Drew
Vortrag: Fr 7
Themen: Agility
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09:00 - 16:00
Fr 8
Structured Test Design and Condition-Oriented Test Case Design with ECT And MCDC
Structured Test Design and Condition-Oriented Test Case Design with ECT And MCDC

Test case design is one of the core competences of the testing profession. This tutorial is about an effective and elegant technique that is still too little known.

After an overview presentation of test design using coverage-based test design techniques and experience-based test approaches, this tutorial addresses one of the (seemingly) harder techniques from the condition-oriented group of coverage-based test design techniques, the Elementary Comparison Test (ECT) that uses Modified Condition Decision Coverage (MCDC).

Target Audience: Quality Engineers, Test Engineers, Developers
Prerequisites: General knowledge of IT delivery, quality engineering and testing
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Test case design is one of the core competences of the testing profession.

Which test design techniques do you use? And is this effective and efficient?

In the TMAP body of knowledge we distinguish 4 main groups of test design techniques: Process-oriented (such as path testing), Condition-oriented (such as decision table testing), Data-oriented (such as Data Combination test) and Appearance-oriented (such as Syntactic testing and performance testing).

After an overview presentation of test design using coverage-based test design techniques and experience-based test approaches, this tutorial addresses one of the (seemingly) harder techniques from the condition-oriented group of coverage-based test design techniques, the Elementary Comparison Test that uses Modified Condition Decision Coverage.

Suppose you must test the entry-check of the new Wuthering Heights Rollercoaster in the QualityLand amusement park. Every person must be at least 120 cm tall to be allowed in the rollercoaster. What technique would you use? Boundary Value Analysis (from the group data-oriented testing), right? That’s not a tough choice.

But now the marketing department of QualityLand has a special offer for Halloween. To be allowed with the special discount-rate, a person must still be at least 120 cm tall, but must also wear a Halloween outfit and needs to be at the gate on 31 October (that’s a decision with 3 conditions). On top of this, if the person has bought a ticket online, and paid 10% extra, they may skip the line (that’s another decision, with 2 conditions).

So, all in all you have 2 decision points, with together 5 conditions.

Now what test case design technique do you use?

In the above example (with 5 conditions) choose a condition-oriented test design technique. But which? Probably you know Decision Table Testing. Applying this technique would lead to 2-to-the-power-of-5 = 32 test cases. That’s a bit too much to call this an efficient test set.

My advice is to use the Elementary Comparison Test (ECT) design technique, together with Modified Condition Decision Coverage (MCDC). This way, with only 6 (!!) test cases you can guarantee that EVERY condition has contributed to trigger EVERY outcome of the entry-check of the rollercoaster. So, it is both effective and efficient!

Have you never heard of ECT before? Well, even though it exists for decades, I can imagine, because ISTQB doesn’t teach you this. But is has been part of the TMAP body of knowledge since 1995 :-)

This HUSTEF conference you will get your chance to learn all about ECT & MCDC!!

Join me in this half-day or full-day tutorial and I will make sure that you will get hands-on experience.

Rik Marselis is principal quality consultant at Sogeti in the Netherlands. He is a well-appreciated presenter, trainer, author, consultant, and coach in the world of quality engineering. His presentations are always appreciated for their liveliness, his ability to keep the talks serious but light, and his use of practical examples with humorous comparisons.
Rik is a trainer for test design techniques for over 15 years.
Rik Marselis
Rik Marselis
Vortrag: Fr 8
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