PROGRAMM

Die im Konferenzprogramm der OOP 2021 Digital angegebenen Uhrzeiten entsprechen der Central European Time (CET).

Per Klick auf "VORTRAG MERKEN" innerhalb der Vortragsbeschreibungen können Sie sich Ihren eigenen Zeitplan zusammenstellen. Sie können diesen über das Symbol in der rechten oberen Ecke jederzeit einsehen.

Track: Social Integration

Nach Tracks filtern
Alle ausklappen
  • Dienstag
    09.02.
  • Donnerstag
    11.02.
09:00 - 10:45
Di 7.1
No Blame – More Flame! How Learning from Mistakes Can Help Us Thrive in Complexity
No Blame – More Flame! How Learning from Mistakes Can Help Us Thrive in Complexity

If you’re not making mistakes, you have no chance to learn enough! This is especially true in complex situations, where, more often than not, the difference between a success and a failure can only be seen in hindsight. Which is why it pays off to dare new things, even if that might mean you can go wrong–as long as you don’t make the same mistake twice!

In this interactive talk we will explore how psychological safety, creativity, complexity and motivation are connected. And we will exercise our “No Blame – More Flame” mentality.

Target Audience
: Testers, Developers, Leaders, Managers, Teamplayers
Prerequisites: Curiosity and willingness to challenge one's own habits
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Let’s remember, that in the beginning of IT and software development there was no chartered territory. There was no right or wrong path – great minds dared to venture on into new lands. And sometimes they failed. Spectacularly or subtle, with a chance of correction or at huge (monetary) sunk costs. But always with great learnings, albeit not always good documentation.

Yet in school and in life we often get punished for failures. And as a result, we learn that pointing the blame away from ourselves pays off. This is not only bad for the climate and culture in a team or in an organization, it is also detrimental when it comes to our ability to learn. Especially in uncertain and complex contexts, where this ability is crucial to survive and thrive. When we block our learning capabilities, we lose our powers to deal with the unknown, to adapt to new and emerging information, to explore solutions. This inhibits progress and kills motivation.

While most of the above facts are common sense or even common knowledge, it is quite hard to break the mental and behavioral habits we were taught throughout education and our work-lives.

In this talk I will summarize the concept of psychological safety and the effects of a psychologically safe culture on creativity and solution focus in teams. I will introduce a “tool” to adopt a more open-minded and learning focused mindset. The participants will get the opportunity to discuss how the tool can be applied in their individual contexts. Also, I will let the participants exercise a method which helps to change the interpretation of mistakes as something dangerous and evil to something viewed as valuable and helpful. The method uses failures as steppingstones to come up with improved solutions, which not only enhances the results but also lets us question our mistake-habits. Finally, I will wrap things up by speaking about how handling errors affects motivation.

Maren Baermann ( Dipl. Psych & M.S. Creative Studies) is an innovation psychologist with a passion for agility & innovation culture. To her the key to sustainable growth for any organization is the ability to think novel & solution-oriented, then apply the insights gained in an agile manner. This always begins with people. That’s why she specialized in enabling people, through creativity workshops, innovation team-buildings, soft-skill seminars & measures to foster an agile innovation culture.
Human Beings in Retrospectives - Body Language and Psychology
Human Beings in Retrospectives - Body Language and Psychology

When facilitating retrospectives, there is often a focus on the agenda, the activities and the experiments you take away from the retrospective. Also, there might be a technical theme for the retrospective, but the people and the process for cooperation and communication is often what you end up discussing.

I will provide you with tips and tricks for how to avoid neglecting the human aspect of your retrospectives; the trust, the different personality types, the feeling of safety, and what you can pick up from the body language.

Target Audience: Facilitators, project leaders, managers, coaches, team leaders, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: Have facilitated retrospectives or wants to facilitate them in the future
Level: Advanced

Aino Corry is a teacher, a technical conference editor and retrospectives facilitator. She holds a masters degree and a ph.d. in computer science. She has 12 years of experience with Patterns in Software Development, and 13 years of experience in facilitating retrospectives. She also teaches how to teach Computer Science to teachers, and thus lives up to the name of her company; Metadeveloper. In her spare time, she runs and sings (but not at the same time).
Maren Baermann
Aino Vonge Corry
Maren Baermann
Vortrag: Di 7.1-1
Aino Vonge Corry
Vortrag: Di 7.1-2
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
14:00 - 14:45
Di 7.2
Es darf auch mal dynamisch sein - Floating Teams statt starrer Teams
Es darf auch mal dynamisch sein - Floating Teams statt starrer Teams

Ein weit verbreiteter Glaube ist, dass nur konstante Teams langfristig zu hochperformanten Teams werden können. Jede Veränderung löst Teamprozesse aus, die das Team daran hindern, sich auf das Wesentliche zu fokussieren. Doch passt das nicht immer zum Kontext, in dem wir uns bewegen. Im Vortrag geht es um einen dynamischeren Ansatz, in dem sich die Teams nach Anforderung unterschiedlich formen. Neben dem Konzept geht es in dem Vortrag auch um die dafür notwendigen Rahmenbedingungen.

Zielpublikum: Projektleiter:innen, Scrum Master und alle, die mit größeren Teams arbeiten
Voraussetzungen: Grundkenntnisse von agilen Methoden und Teamdynamiken
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Fortgeschritten

Extended Abstract:
In verschiedenen Projekten stellen wir immer wieder fest, dass es ein sehr starres "Die Teams müssen konstant sein"-Denken gibt. Das ist auch häufig nützlich, aber nicht immer. Wir haben gute Erfahrungen mit dem Konzept von Floating Teams gemacht. Diese arbeiten an einem zentralen Backlog und bilden sich für jede Aufgabe neu. Entstanden ist das Konzept in einem Projekt, wo am Beginn nicht klar war, wie wir die Teams gut aufstellen können. In der Selbstorganisation haben sich nicht, wie erwartet, konstante Gruppen herausgebildet, sondern ein sehr gut funktionierendes, dynamisches Gebilde. Rückblickend wurde deutlich, dass ein zentrales Backlog, ein gemeinsames Big Picture (hier durch Story Mapping) und Erfahrung in der Arbeit in echten Teams notwendige Voraussetzungen sind.

Ich möchte mit diesem Vortrag Denkanstöße geben, aus dem starren Denken "konstante Teams" auszubrechen, und eine andere Option der Zusammenarbeit aufzeigen. In Trainings stelle ich es mittlerweile parallel zu anderen Skalierungsframeworks um zu zeigen, dass man mit sehr einfachen Mitteln, ohne komplexe Frameworks und Änderungen schon zu der Entwicklung guter Produkte beitragen kann.

Stefan Zumbrägel hat nach dem Lehramtsstudium als Entwickler und Scrum Master in verschiedenen Programmen gearbeitet. Seit 2016 arbeitet er bei it-agile und begleitet Unternehmen auf ihrem Weg in die Agilität. Als Zertifizierter Scrum Trainer (CST) liegt sein Arbeitsschwerpunkt aktuell auf der Ausbildung von Product Ownern und Scrum Mastern. In über 30 Jahren als Pfadfinder hat er viele Erfahrungen mit Teams und Teamdynamiken gesammelt.
Benjamin Igna ist Diplom Wirtschaftsingenieur. Während seines Studiums konnte er sich ausgiebig mit dem Toyota-Produktions-System sowie dem Lean Mindset in der Produktion beschäftigen. Nach dem Studium beschäftigte er sich mit agilen Organisationsformen, im Speziellen mit Scrum und Kanban.
Bei it-agile hilft er Organisationen dabei, Strukturen für sich zu finden, in denen erfüllte Mitarbeiter bessere Services und Produkte erschaffen können
Stefan Zumbrägel, Benjamin Igna
Stefan Zumbrägel, Benjamin Igna
Vortrag: Di 7.2
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
16:15 - 17:15
Di 7.3
Leader, Mentor, Coach: 3 Roles of a Software Architect
Leader, Mentor, Coach: 3 Roles of a Software Architect

As architects become more senior, we are expected to contribute to growing the product, the organization, and the people. This session explores three roles of an architect that help them meet these expectations: architect as leader, as mentor, as coach. This session offers practical tools, methods, and frameworks that help both experienced and aspiring architects succeed in each of these roles.

Target Audience: Architects, engineers, developers, managers, senior/principal/distinguished engineers
Prerequisites: Curiosity about how architects can be effective leaders, mentors, and coaches
Level: Advanced

Ken Power is an architect, engineering leader, consultant, researcher, coach, and educator. He works with large, global technology organizations to start, grow, and transform organizations, improving their product and service delivery capability, and helping them be more effective and joyful businesses. Ken has authored more than 35 peer-reviewed publications on software engineering topics He was co-editor of the 2019 IEEE Software special issue on Large-Scale Agile Development.
Ken Power
Ken Power
Vortrag: Di 7.3
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
17:45 - 18:45
Di 7.4
Von Idioten umzingelt - oder einmal mit Profis arbeiten
Von Idioten umzingelt - oder einmal mit Profis arbeiten

Wieso haben wir so häufig das Gefühl, nur von Idiot:innen umzingelt zu sein? Was schürt in uns den Verdacht, dass die anderen immer so blöd sind? Wieso sind Geschäftsführer:innen so ignorant und verschwenderisch, Entwickler:innen so borniert, Admins so unfähig und Projektmanager:innen so ahnungslos? Wieso versteht eigentlich niemand Agile?

Wir wollen die Symptome der Idiotie betrachten und Ursachenforschung betreiben; herausfinden, warum wir selbst idiotisch sind und weshalb wir viel mehr Zeit zum Lernen brauchen.

Zielpublikum: Jeder, der mit anderen Menschen zusammenarbeitet
Voraussetzungen: Man hat sich dabei erwischt, andere für idiotisch zu halten
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Extended Abstract
:
Wieso haben wir so häufig das Gefühl, nur von Idiot:innen umzingelt zu sein? Was schürt in uns den Verdacht, dass die anderen immer so blöd sind? Wieso sind Geschäftsführer:innen so ignorant und verschwenderisch, Entwickler:innen so borniert, Admins so unfähig und Projektmanager:innen so ahnungslos? Wieso versteht eigentlich niemand Agile?

Wir wollen die Symptome der Idiotie betrachten und Ursachenforschung betreiben; herausfinden, warum wir selbst idiotisch sind und weshalb wir viel mehr Zeit zum Lernen brauchen. In diesem Zusammenhang werden wir uns Cognitive Biases, Logical Fallacies, Heuristiken und das Fixed und Growth Mindset ansehen.

Falk Kühnel ist begeisterter Agilist auf der Suche nach dem Glück, großartigen Arbeitsumgebungen und mitarbeiterorientierten Unternehmen, die gute Gewinne erwirtschaften.

Falk beschäftigt sich seit dem Studium der Informatik mit XP und agilen Methoden.

Außerdem ist er ausgebildeter Mediengestalter, Diplom-Informatiker (Dipl.-Inf.), Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Trainer für Certified Scrum Developer, CSM, CSPO, CSD und CSP, Team Kanban Practitioner und praktizierender Zyniker.

Falk Kühnel
Falk Kühnel
Vortrag: Di 7.4
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
09:00 - 10:30
Do 6.1
How Cognitive Biases and Ranking can Foster an Ineffective Architecture and Design
How Cognitive Biases and Ranking can Foster an Ineffective Architecture and Design

The power of collaborative modelling comes from having a diverse group of people who, together, have a lot of wisdom. The problem here is we don’t actually listen to all the available input and perspectives due to cognitive biases and ranking. If we aren't aware of that it kills those insights and wisdom and kills the effectiveness of your models! In this talk where we will explore how we can improve our facilitation skills and focus on neuro-inclusiveness with using Deep Democracy in our design process.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Decision Makers, CTO, Tech Leads, designers, facilitators
Prerequisites: Facilitating or doing collaborate modelling
Level: Expert

Extended Abstract:
The power of collaborative modelling comes from having a diverse group of people who, together, have a lot of wisdom and knowledge. You would expect that all this knowledge will be put to use, co-creating, and to design a model. In reality, we don’t actually listen to all the available input and perspectives due to cognitive biases and ranking. Because not everything that needs to be said has been said, we will end up with sub-optimal models and architecture. Even worse, people don’t feel part of the solution and don’t commit to it. Good architecture and design need all the insights and perception. If we are not aware, cognitive biases and ranking kills those insights and wisdom and kills the effectiveness of your models!

Join us in this talk where we will interactively explore how we can improve our facilitation skills and focus on neuro-inclusiveness with Lewis Deep Democracy (LDD). By having a Deep Democratic discussions together on what biases are at play during liberating structures workshops, and how ranking will effect a visual collaborative modelling session like EventStorming and User Story Mapping, you will gain first-hand experience about LDD. With this experience, we will explain how we embedded LDD in our design processes. We will let you leave with the knowledge on how to observe sabotage behaviour, battle oppression, and to create safety in exploring alternative perceptions. We will show you how you can really let the group say what needs to be said and take a collective autocratic decision in designing your software models.

Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
Evelyn van Kelle is a strategic software delivery consultant, with experience in coaching, advising and guiding organisations and teams in designing socio-technical systems.
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle
Vortrag: Do 6.1
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
11:00 - 11:45
Do 6.2
Sustainable Pace in der Praxis oder Gesunde Teams sind starke Teams
Sustainable Pace in der Praxis oder Gesunde Teams sind starke Teams

Anhand ihrer Erfahrungen mit eigenen Krebserkrankungen teilen Jasmine und Jan, was Sustainable Pace wirklich für agiles Arbeiten bedeutet. In Teams tun wir uns oft schwer damit, ein nachhaltiges Arbeiten für uns und unsere Teams zu erschaffen. In diesem Workshop ergründen wir, warum achtsamer Umgang mit der eigenen Gesundheit - und der Gesundheit unserer Teams - zu produktiveren Arbeitsumgebungen führt. Dabei entdecken wir, was jeder von uns tun kann, um gesunde und menschliche Systeme zu erschaffen, die wir heute dringender brauchen denn je.

Zielpublikum:
Scrum Master, Management, Agile Coaches, Projektleiter:innen, Teammitglieder
Voraussetzungen: Neugierde und Offenheit
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Extended Abstract:
Im Beruflichen ist es sehr offensichtlich, dass Jasmine und Jan vieles gemeinsam haben. Beide sind Agile Coaches, lieben es, im Trainingsraum zu stehen, und betreiben zusammen den Agile Monday Rhein-Neckar. Privat verbindet sie beide noch etwas anderes: beide konnten ganz knapp eine langwierige Krebstherapie abwenden. Und das nur durch eher zufälliges Einstehen für sich selber und doch frühzeitig zum Arzt gehen.

In diesem Workshop wollen wir mit den Teilnehmenden ergründen, welche subtilen Bemerkungen und Haltungen im Arbeitsumfeld viele Teammitglieder davon abhält, für sich selber und die eigene Gesundheit einzustehen. Welche Auswirkungen dies schlussendlich auch auf die Performance des gesamten Teams hat und wie wir zusammen ein Umfeld kreieren können, in welchem für sich Einstehen kein Zufall mehr ist, sondern Selbstverständlichkeit. Denn nur, wenn jedes Individuum im Team gut für sich selber sorgt, können wir ein gesundes und nachhaltiges Umfeld für das gesamte Team erschaffen - und somit auch die Basis zu nachhaltiger Wertschöpfung.

Jasmine Simons-Zahno ist „Agile Psychologin“, die sich leidenschaftlich für die menschliche Seite der Produktentwicklung einsetzt.

Ihr Masterstudium in Organisationspsychologie qualifiziert sie auf einzigartige Weise für die Auseinandersetzung mit den Hindernissen und Widerständen, welche entstehen, wenn das agile Paradigma mit traditionellen Organisationsstrukturen kollidiert.

Sie hat es sich zum Ziel gesetzt, Unternehmen dabei zu unterstützen, produktive und motivierende Umgebungen zu schaffen, die Mitarbeiter ermutigen und inspirieren, ihre beste Arbeit mit Freude zu leisten.

Jan Neudecker arbeitet als Agiler Coach und Scrum Trainer. Seit er eher zufällig mit Scrum in Kontakt kam, hat ihn das Thema agiles Arbeiten gepackt. Getrieben davon, Teams mehr Freude und Sinn an ihrer Arbeit zu ermöglichen, ist er bei verschiedensten Kunden unterwegs, um seine Erfahrungen zu teilen und zu erweitern. Er ist davon überzeugt, dass dies der Grundstein dafür ist, dem Kunden nachhaltigen Mehrwert zu generieren.
Jasmine Simons-Zahno, Jan Neudecker
Jasmine Simons-Zahno, Jan Neudecker
Vortrag: Do 6.2
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
14:30 - 15:30
Do 6.3
Problem? What Problem? Practice Collaborative Problem-solving?
Problem? What Problem? Practice Collaborative Problem-solving?

Working in teams we face problems in our daily work. As a team, we should be able to solve problems collaboratively. Agile calls these problems impediments.

Impediments can be something in the way of working, processes, tools, or organizational rules or structures. They can also be something cultural or structural.

In this mini-workshop we'll practice solving an impediment as a team. Next, we'll explore how we solved it, how we worked together. What hindered and helped us. We'll learn what we can do to collaborate better.

Maximum number of participants: 60

Target Audience: Scrum masters, tech leads, agile coaches, consultants, developers, testers, managers, CxOs
Prerequisites: Some experience of working in teams
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
This is a hands-on mini-workshop about collaborative problem-solving. It will be an interactive session where people work together to solve a problem in a kind of role-play. Next, we'll explore the behaviors that arose, focusing on what helps and hinders collaboration.

I'll kick it off by presenting problem-solving techniques and tips for collaborative problem-solving and dealing with impediments.

During the session, we'll split up into groups using breakout rooms. In each group, a part of the attendees will do a role play where they work on a problem, where others will be observing how this goes. If time permits, we'll rotate solving two impediments.

Next, the observers will share what they saw happening where the group discusses this.

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality, and Continuous Improvement. As an adviser, trainer, and coach, he helps organizations with effectively deploying software development and management practices. He focuses on continuous improvement, collaboration and communication, and professional development, to deliver business value to customers.

Ben is an active member of networks on Agile, Lean, and Quality, and a well-known speaker and author.


Ben Linders
Ben Linders
Vortrag: Do 6.3
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Zurück