PROGRAMM

Die im Konferenzprogramm der OOP 2021 Digital angegebenen Uhrzeiten entsprechen der Central European Time (CET).

Per Klick auf "VORTRAG MERKEN" innerhalb der Vortragsbeschreibungen können Sie sich Ihren eigenen Zeitplan zusammenstellen. Sie können diesen über das Symbol in der rechten oberen Ecke jederzeit einsehen.

Track: Business Agility

Nach Tracks filtern
Alle ausklappen
  • Dienstag
    09.02.
  • Donnerstag
    11.02.
09:00 - 10:30
Di 4.1
Dancing the BOSSA Nova – How to Bring a Culture of Experimentation into Your Company
Dancing the BOSSA Nova – How to Bring a Culture of Experimentation into Your Company

This workshop gives a short introduction to BOSSA nova (Beyond Budgeting, Open Space, Sociocracy and Agile combined to support company-wide agility), but is mainly very interactive, supported by various Liberating Structures.

It helps the participants to identify and refine their biggest challenges in the agile transformation in their organization and provides a structure in which they can create and improve a probe that they can start with when back in office.

A practical workshop for probe-sense-responding.

Target Audience: No exclusions, everyone can make a small step
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Edwin Burgers is working in IT for 20+ years in various roles from developer to agile consultant. Since 2009 he supports teams and organizations to become more effective and nimble.
Maryse Meinen is a scrum master and agile coach, helping people uncover better ways.
Spreading the love for true empiricism and for dancing the BOSSA nova is her focus for 2021

Edwin Burgers, Maryse I. Meinen
Edwin Burgers, Maryse I. Meinen
Vortrag: Di 4.1
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
14:00 - 14:45
Di 4.2
The Extended Business Model Canvas (EBMC) - Leveraging a Startup-Tool to an Enterprise-Artifact
The Extended Business Model Canvas (EBMC) - Leveraging a Startup-Tool to an Enterprise-Artifact

The Extended Business Model Canvas (EBMC) links Lean Portfolio Management, System Thinking, Lean Product development, and agile development in a way suitable for established enterprises, not just startups.

Two additional components, the "Contribution to Strategy" and "Technical Debt," apply now to both operational and development values. Those components are supported by two special lenses that help agile teams to connect better, align, and achieve more business agility.

Target Audience: Architects, Business Owners, Portfolio Managers, Product Managers, POs, SMs, Agile Teams
Prerequisites: Scaled Agile Frameworks
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The business model canvas (BMC) developed by Osterwalder and Pigneur explains "how value is created, delivered and captured from an organizational perspective." The BMC excels through the addition of the simple yet effective Value Proposition Canvas (VPC). The BMC combined with the VPC unfolds the driving powers and key pivot points along the operational value stream. It is a valuable Business Agility artifact increasing transparency along the operational value stream.

To link development value streams to operational value streams, it is helpful to abandon the greenfield approach and extend the BMC by to additional components.

The two extensions are "Contribution to the Strategy" and "Technical Debt." Nearly every epic has to legitimate its strategic fit for purpose in a more transparent way. Technical debt is also a matter that has to be dealt with transparently, as it seldom will disappear in the short term.

In this interactive presentation, the participants will learn how the EBMC can be used to help our clients to thrive in the digital age. Depending on the level of audience participation, this will range from a presentation based on the Corona-Warn-App as a use case to an audience-specific workshop.

The secret sauce is: how do we break down Strategy and Technical debt. The presentation shows how these two components can be examined generically to increase transparency.

We do this in three steps:

#1
Recap the application of the BMC and VPC. Let us lookout for some pitfalls when dealing with a more complex intake when there is some ambiguity between the operational and development value stream and the mapping of funding to ARTs. We usually see this when there is a complex mashup between value streams, reverse demand, and regular business, BAU IT-demand, and multiple ARTs.

#2
We add "Contribution to the Strategy" to the BMC to map the complex intake described in #1 and link the greenfield BMC with strategic themes and the portfolio level to integrate the various usually concurring stakeholders.

#3
We add "Technical Debt" to enable the program layer to better participate in environments with complex interwoven system landscapes and numerous different components and platforms.

Kurt Cotoaga started as a research assistant using evolutionary algorithms to solve np-hard problems. Those fascinating problems are still unsolved ...
His first pivot brought him into the product manager role for large online brokerage web sites where he fooled himself and others into mixing up causality and correlation. It was a tough ride in the epicenter of the dot-com bubble burst ...
Having been perpetually torn apart between trying to create business value and pretending to be predictable, he pivoted around 2005 towards agility as a survival kit. From projects via programs to portfolios via products - this finally worked!
The last pivot beamed him into the consulting world, where he helps clients to thrive in the digital age as a Business Value addicted Digitalization Evangelist.
Kurt Cotoaga
Kurt Cotoaga
Vortrag: Di 4.2
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
16:15 - 17:15
Di 4.3
What’s That Smell? – How Frustrations Over Different Kinds of Debt Guide Our Agile Transformation
What’s That Smell? – How Frustrations Over Different Kinds of Debt Guide Our Agile Transformation

Together with 100 IT engineers we have been given the freedom to figure out how to transform from doing traditional IT Operations to being agile.

We use Scrum@Scale and Heart of Agile to remove debt; Organizational Debt in the form of old leadership structures that create unclear mandate for scrum roles and prevents organizing around products; Technical Debt that keeps us busy maintaining old technologies and prevents the creation of relevant cloud infrastructure products.

Our story is about how to fuel change through addressing frustrations.

Target Audience: Managers, Coaches, decision makers, Project Leaders, Practitioners
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of agile frameworks and methodology
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
:
In 2017, we together with 100 IT engineers in an internal IT function of an old industrial company set out to transform our organization from being traditional and hierarchical to becoming agile. The fundamental premise was that the top management invited us to change and gave us freedom to figure out how we would accomplish this. In this process, we used different ‘compasses’ such as Scrum at Scale and Heart of Agile that on different levels helped us navigate what step to take next to facilitate the change.

What we have come to realize was that it has been our major frustrations that have helped us navigate with these compasses and make decisions, and that many of the sources for our frustrations have been different kinds of ‘debt’. Organizational debt in the form of ‘old’ leadership structures that created unclear mandate for scrum leader roles and prevented teams from organizing around products. Process debt shows itself in an ITIL operating mindset that kept us from reinventing ourselves as a ‘development organization’ with continuous deployment and end user focus. And technical debt kept us busy maintaining old technologies and systems and prevented focus on learning about the brave new world of ‘the cloud’ and creating new, relevant infrastructure products at high speed. So far our efforts have given us an unexpected happy ending, as even if we still have long way to go on to become truly agile, our changes so far prepared the organization for the unforeseeable: Covid-19.

Our talk is a reflecting experience report about the frustrations that we have met and acted on and on frustrations we are currently living with and trying to act on. It is about how we are slowly uncovering how the past is haunting the organization in so many ways – which is also the reason why the only way forward is a step-by-step process that cannot be planned up front.

We will provide examples from our past – where we have failed and succeeded but, most important, learned – and we will look forward at the challenges we have ahead of us in what we expect to be a 10 year journey towards an agile culture.

Anne Abell has a PhD in "IT project success" from Aarhus University in Denmark and has worked 9 years with the LEGO Group with infrastructure and cyber security strategy and agile transformation.
Rasmus Lund-Jensen has been with the LEGO Group for 6 years where he heads up the transformation in the infrastructure department.
Carsten Jakobsen has 20 years of experience working with agile in different organizations, supporting the LEGO Group for 2 years.
Anne Abell, Rasmus Lund-Jensen, Carsten Ruseng Jakobsen
Anne Abell, Rasmus Lund-Jensen, Carsten Ruseng Jakobsen
Vortrag: Di 4.3
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
17:45 - 18:45
Di 4.4
Mythen, Erfolge und Fehler auf dem Weg zur Business Agility für regulierte Medizinprodukte
Mythen, Erfolge und Fehler auf dem Weg zur Business Agility für regulierte Medizinprodukte

Es erwartet Sie ein lebendiger Bericht über die agile Transition bei Siemens Healthineers. Wir bieten Einblicke in die von uns gewählten Ansätze zum Portfoliomanagement und teilen unsere Erfahrungen auf dem Weg zur agilen Entwicklung komplexer Produkte (>300 Personen, SAFe). Wir beschreiben die ersten Schritte in eine Verbreitung von Agilität in die Gesamtorganisation (Personal, Marketing). Anhand von Beispielen zeigen wir gelungene und nicht gelungene Ansätze zur Gestaltung eines Kulturwandels.

Zielpublikum: Agile Change Agents, Manager:innen, Entscheider:innen, Architekt:innen
Voraussetzungen: Grundverständnis von Agilität
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Fortgeschritten

Extended Abstract:
Die ersten agilen Schritte wurden bei Siemens Healthineers bereits 2008 mit der Einführung von Scrum getan. Seit 2017 wird nun konzernweit die agile Transition vorangetrieben. Das Transition Team stellt seine gemachten Erfahrungen vor, insbesondere auch nicht erwartungsgemäße Ergebnisse und die Lehren daraus. Es werden beispielsweise die Themen Changemanagement, Scrum / agile Teams, Team of Teams, Portfolio sowie Management Support analysiert. Der Vortrag ist keine reine Frontalveranstaltung, sondern bietet dem Publikum auch Gelegenheit, sich aktiv einzubringen.

Robert Kochseder sammelte vor 10 Jahren erste agile Erfahrungen mit Scrum. Er ist seit 2017 bei Siemens Healthineers für die agile Transition verantwortlich, zudem ist er Assessor bei der Systemarchitekturausbildung.
Katja Keller ist Betriebswirtin, Informatikerin und Coach und seit 2008 Certified SM und PO. Sie begleitet als Senior Agile Coach im global Transition Team die agile Transition bei Siemens Healthineers.
Robert Kochseder, Katja Keller
Robert Kochseder, Katja Keller
Vortrag: Di 4.4
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
09:00 - 10:30
Do 4.1
Game Facilitation Primer
Game Facilitation Primer

Tired of running workshops without gamification? Want to move from pure content to engagement? Want to use agile games and don't know how? And maybe most important: How to do that remote/online?

Gamification is the hot topic. Everyone talks about it. Unfortunately nobody knows what games to pick and how to facilitate them. Getting started in this field of highly valuable agile games for workshop facilitation is not easy.

We give you everything you need to design engaging online and offline workshops.

Target Audience: Scrum Master, Agile Coaches, HR, Change Agents, Managers
Prerequisites: None. We'll introduce the topic
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
The participants will get a clear image where to go next in gamifying their workshops, trainings, conference sessions. For that we give the participants everything they need to design engaging online and offline events.

The session involves the participants through several interactive activities.

We answer the question how and when to include games. And how to reach learning objectives by guiding the participants through our own Agile Game Mapping.

We show how to prepare for such workshops. With the Agile Game Toolboxes for both online and offline events, participants will take away immediately usable ideas for their working environment. We bring lots of real-world examples “to go”, i.e. physical games to play in offline events, as well as many game designs to be used remotely. Our session will close with answering as many questions as possible.

Since Dennis Wagner started his software development profession at the age of 17 he experienced many times that Agile is the way to go. He works as end-to-end coach and supports both teams and management.
Marc Bless has 20+ years experience as Agile Coach, software developer, and leader. As Solution-Focused Coach and Certified Enterprise Coach he supports organizations on their way to more Business Agility.

Dennis Wagner, Marc Bless
Dennis Wagner, Marc Bless
Vortrag: Do 4.1
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
11:00 - 11:45
Do 4.2
Becoming an Agile People Manager
Becoming an Agile People Manager

Is agile management an oxymoron? And if it's not, what does it really involve? I've been exploring what it means to be a good people manager, and especially, to be a good manager in an agile context, where the focus is not on command and control, but on encouraging people to be autonomous and sharing information. In this talk, I will share stories and my own personal "rules of engagement" - principles to guide me and concrete actions or responses to common situations.

Target Audience:
Managers, leaders,
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
The world doesn't like testers. As a tester, I spent time and effort trying to improve the world for testers to live in. Then I also became a manager. Now I have to start over to improve the next space! And my plan of attack is to set an example by being the best manager I can be.

Never one to ignore a challenge, I've been exploring what it means to be a good people manager, and especially, to be a good manager in an agile context, where the focus is not on command and control, but on encouraging people to be autonomous and sharing information. In this talk, I want to share stories and my own personal "rules of engagement" - principles to guide me and concrete actions or responses to common situations.


I'll go into:
• The power and danger of empathy
• The rule of yes or tomorrow
• Rituals for trust
• Being authentic and vulnerable
• Leading by example

I'll share things that have worked, things that haven't, and how I reflect on my growth and learnings to keep progressing.

Alex Schladebeck ist eine Testerin aus Leidenschaft. Ihr Herz schlägt für Qualität, Agilität und ihre Mitmenschen. Sie ist Geschäftsführerin und Leiterin der Qualitätssicherung bei der Bredex GmbH.

In diesen Rollen unterstützt sie Kollegen, Kunden und Teams auf ihrer Reise, bessere Qualität zu liefern: in Produkten, in Prozessen und in der Kommunikation.

In früheren Rollen war sie für die Befähigung von Teams und qualitativ hochwertige Systeme verantwortlich. Nun befähigt sie andere, genau das zu machen, und sorgt für eine Umgebung in der Firma, wo jede(r) aufblühen kann.

Alex schaut mit neugierigen Tester-Augen auf die Welt und möchte immer dazu lernen. Sie teilt ihr Wissen und ihre Erfahrungen in Workshops, Coachings und als Sprecherin oder Keynote-Sprecherin auf Konferenzen.
Alex Schladebeck
Alex Schladebeck
Vortrag: Do 4.2
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
14:30 - 15:30
Do 4.3
Wirkungsvolle Agilität - oder "agile as if you meant it"
Wirkungsvolle Agilität - oder "agile as if you meant it"

Häufig wird Agilität missverstanden als: Hauptsache dem Team gehts gut.

Agilität will aber bessere Ergebnisse erzielen, die das Leben der Kunden verbessern und gleichzeitig dem eigenen Unternehmen nützen. Und diese Wirkungen müssen auch nachweisbar sein, und zwar früh: kein Herumdrücken ums Konkretwerden, kein Vertrösten auf Später, keine Angst vor Accountability.

Der Vortrag diskutiert die Zusammenhänge zwischen Team-Fähigkeiten, Ergebnissen und Wirkungen. Er stellt Werkzeuge vor, wie diese drei Dimensionen geplant und bewertet werden können.

Zielpublikum: Management, Scrum Master, Projektleiter:innen
Voraussetzungen: Praxiserfahrung mit agil, Scrum-Begrifflichkeiten
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Fortgeschritten

Extended Abstract:
Agile Entwicklung unterscheidet sich vom klassischen Vorgehen mit Wasserfall und Command & Control unter anderem durch ihren Menschenfokus. Schon das erste Wertepaar des agilen Mainfests macht dies sehr deutlich: „Individuen und Interaktionen wichtiger als Prozesse und Tools“. Allerdings wird dieser Menschenfokus häufig mit Scheuklappen betrieben, von Agile Coaches, von Scrum Mastern und auch von Teammitgliedern: Hauptsache dem Team gehts gut. Dann kommt der Rest von alleine. Das wäre cool, ist aber leider selten so.

Agile Entwicklung unterscheidet sich vom klassischen Vorgehen mit Wasserfall und Command & Control unter anderem durch ihren Menschenfokus. Schon das erste Wertepaar des agilen Mainfests macht dies sehr deutlich: „Individuen und Interaktionen wichtiger als Prozesse und Tools“. Allerdings wird dieser Menschenfokus häufig mit Scheuklappen betrieben, von Agile Coaches, von Scrum Mastern und auch von Teammitgliedern: Hauptsache dem Team gehts gut. Dann kommt der Rest von alleine. Das wäre cool, ist aber leider selten so.

Agilität ist dazu da, um bessere Ergebnisse zu erzielen, die wirksam sind: Sie sollen das Leben der Kunden und Nutzer verbessern und gleichzeitig dem Unternehmen nützen. Immerhin lautete das erste Prinzip des Agilen Manifests: „Unsere höchste Priorität ist es, Kunden durch frühe und kontinuierliche Auslieferung von wertvoller Software zufrieden zu stellen.”

Der Vortrag diskutiert die Zusammenhänge zwischen Team-Fähigkeiten, Ergebnissen und Wirkungen. Er stellt Werkzeuge vor, wie die verschiedenen Dimensionen betrachtet und letztlich auch gemessen werden können. Denn dort, wo Wirkungen erzielt werden, müssen sich diese auch nachweisen lassen.

Stefan Roock (it-agile) hilft Unternehmen, Führungskräften und Teams dabei, ihre Potenziale zu entfalten - hin zu erfolgreichen Unternehmen, die ihre Kunden und Mitarbeitenden begeistern. Er ist davon überzeugt, dass dazu strukturelle, personelle und interpersonelle Themen im Zusammenspiel adressiert werden müssen.

Stefan Roock hat seit 1999 agile Ansätze in Deutschland maßgeblich mit verbreitet und weiterentwickelt. Zunächst hat er als Entwickler in agilen Teams, später als Scrum Master/Agile Coach und Product Owner gearbeitet. Heute arbeitet er zusammen mit seinen Kollegen daran, dass Unternehmen langfristig mit agilen Denk- und Arbeitsweisen erfolgreich sind. Dabei fokussiert er auf agile Leadership.

Er ist regelmäßiger Sprecher zu agilen Themen auf Konferenzen, bei User Groups und in Unternehmen. Außerdem schreibt er Bücher und Artikel zu agilen Themen.
Henning Wolf war 14 Jahre Geschäftsführer bei it-agile und ist dort heute als Leadership-Trainer und -Berater tätig. Er hat er zahlreiche Artikel und Bücher über agile Software-Entwicklung verfasst und ist Autor oder Herausgeber diverser Bücher wie „Agile Software-Entwicklung“, „Die Kraft von Scrum“, „Agile Projekte mit Scrum und Kanban“ und „Scrum verstehen und erfolgreich einsetzen“. Henning Wolf hilft Unternehmen und Organisationen auf agiles Denken umzusteigen.
Stefan Roock, Henning Wolf
Stefan Roock, Henning Wolf
Vortrag: Do 4.3
flag VORTRAG MERKEN
17:00 - 18:00
Do 4.4
Preframe the Future - Reframe the Present from there - zukünftiges Business für die Zukunft designen
Preframe the Future - Reframe the Present from there - zukünftiges Business für die Zukunft designen

Die wirklich erfolgreichen Innovationen sind nicht einfach neu oder kreativ. Meist steckt in ihnen eine treffende Vorstellung der zukünftigen Welt dahinter, in die wir dann mit ihrer Hilfe hineinwachsen.

Preframing versucht, sich in die Zukunft hineinzudenken und aus dieser Sicht heraus ein neues Business vorzudenken. Preframing ist wegen der "Corona-Beschleunigung" nötiger denn je. Wer sich schließlich erfolgreich in die Zukunft eingefühlt hat, muss wohl auch Reframing betreiben: Wie alt sieht das eigene jetzige Business in dieser Zukunft aus?

Zielpublikum: Alle, die sich für "Weg in die Zukunft" interessieren
Voraussetzungen: Ein Grundverständnis für Prinzipien der Agilität, des DT etc.
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Extended Abstract:
Die wirklich erfolgreichen Innovationen sind nicht einfach neu oder kreativ. Meist steckt in ihnen eine Idee der zukünftigen Welt dahinter, in die wir dann mit ihrer Hilfe hineinwachsen. Amazon: Ein Kaufhaus für alles im Netz. Google: Alle Info. Nikola: Wasserstoffantriebe aus Solarenergie. Teladoc: Der Arzt in der Vieokonferenz.

Preframing versucht, sich in die Zukunft hineinzudenken und aus dieser Sicht heraus ein neues Business vorzudenken. Preframing hat einen Zweck. Preframing ist in "Corona-Zeiten" nötiger denn je: Denn die Zukunft kommt schneller. Wer sich schließlich erfolgreich in die Zukunft eingefühlt hat, sollte Reframing betreiben: Wie alt sieht das eigene gegenwärtige Business aus, wenn man es aus dem Frame der vorgestellten Zukunft heraus ansieht?

In den meisten Konferenzen werden die Mittel zum Zweck diskutiert: Agilität, Effectuation, Design Thinking etc. Der Vortrag will Zweck und Mittel trennen. Dieser Unterschied verwischt zu oft, obwohl er doch in anderen Frames sehr wohl gut verstanden ist, etwa bei "Gute Musik" (Zweck) zu "Geige kaufen / Tonleitern üben" (Mittel). Um den Zweck als solchen geht es seltener, auch weil das Management den Zweck seit vielen Jahren mit Gewinnsteigerung verwechselt.

Ein solches Denken verhindert zuverlässig jedes Reframing aus der Zukunft heraus und endet mit lautem Fluchen auf störende Disruptionen, die man lange Zeit nicht für möglich gehalten hat. Warum schaut man den Leuten, die Preframing betreiben, nicht aufmerksam zu? Warum nimmt man sie nicht ernst? Man muss sich ja oft nicht einmal selbst die Mühe machen, kreativ zu sein. Die Ideen der Zukunft sind in aller Regel da. Den Grundstock für ein Preframing findet man im Netz vor. Was aber geschieht? Man setzt sich zu Meetings (jetzt per Zoom) zusammen und brütet etwas Kleinteiliges aus, am besten agil.

Gunter Dueck lebt als freier Schriftsteller, Philosoph, Business Angel und Speaker bei Heidelberg. Nach einer Karriere als Mathematikprofessor arbeitete er fast 25 Jahre bei der IBM, zuletzt bei seinem Wechsel in den Unruhestand als Chief Technology Officer. Er ist für humorvoll-satirisch-kritisch-unverblümte Reden und Bücher bekannt, zuletzt „Schwarmdumm“ und „Heute schon einen Prozess optimiert?“.
Gunter Dueck
Gunter Dueck
Vortrag: Do 4.4
flag VORTRAG MERKEN

Zurück