CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Please note:
On this site, there is only displayed the English speaking sessions of the OOP 2021 Digital. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2021 Digital correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "VORTRAG MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

Track: Social Integration

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  • Tuesday
    09.02.
  • Thursday
    11.02.
09:00 - 10:45
Di 7.1
No Blame – More Flame! How Learning from Mistakes Can Help Us Thrive in Complexity
No Blame – More Flame! How Learning from Mistakes Can Help Us Thrive in Complexity

If you’re not making mistakes, you have no chance to learn enough! This is especially true in complex situations, where, more often than not, the difference between a success and a failure can only be seen in hindsight. Which is why it pays off to dare new things, even if that might mean you can go wrong–as long as you don’t make the same mistake twice!

In this interactive talk we will explore how psychological safety, creativity, complexity and motivation are connected. And we will exercise our “No Blame – More Flame” mentality.

Target Audience
: Testers, Developers, Leaders, Managers, Teamplayers
Prerequisites: Curiosity and willingness to challenge one's own habits
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Let’s remember, that in the beginning of IT and software development there was no chartered territory. There was no right or wrong path – great minds dared to venture on into new lands. And sometimes they failed. Spectacularly or subtle, with a chance of correction or at huge (monetary) sunk costs. But always with great learnings, albeit not always good documentation.

Yet in school and in life we often get punished for failures. And as a result, we learn that pointing the blame away from ourselves pays off. This is not only bad for the climate and culture in a team or in an organization, it is also detrimental when it comes to our ability to learn. Especially in uncertain and complex contexts, where this ability is crucial to survive and thrive. When we block our learning capabilities, we lose our powers to deal with the unknown, to adapt to new and emerging information, to explore solutions. This inhibits progress and kills motivation.

While most of the above facts are common sense or even common knowledge, it is quite hard to break the mental and behavioral habits we were taught throughout education and our work-lives.

In this talk I will summarize the concept of psychological safety and the effects of a psychologically safe culture on creativity and solution focus in teams. I will introduce a “tool” to adopt a more open-minded and learning focused mindset. The participants will get the opportunity to discuss how the tool can be applied in their individual contexts. Also, I will let the participants exercise a method which helps to change the interpretation of mistakes as something dangerous and evil to something viewed as valuable and helpful. The method uses failures as steppingstones to come up with improved solutions, which not only enhances the results but also lets us question our mistake-habits. Finally, I will wrap things up by speaking about how handling errors affects motivation.

Maren Baermann ( Dipl. Psych & M.S. Creative Studies) is an innovation psychologist with a passion for agility & innovation culture. To her the key to sustainable growth for any organization is the ability to think novel & solution-oriented, then apply the insights gained in an agile manner. This always begins with people. That’s why she specialized in enabling people, through creativity workshops, innovation team-buildings, soft-skill seminars & measures to foster an agile innovation culture.
Human Beings in Retrospectives - Body Language and Psychology
Human Beings in Retrospectives - Body Language and Psychology

When facilitating retrospectives, there is often a focus on the agenda, the activities and the experiments you take away from the retrospective. Also, there might be a technical theme for the retrospective, but the people and the process for cooperation and communication is often what you end up discussing.

I will provide you with tips and tricks for how to avoid neglecting the human aspect of your retrospectives; the trust, the different personality types, the feeling of safety, and what you can pick up from the body language.

Target Audience: Facilitators, project leaders, managers, coaches, team leaders, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: Have facilitated retrospectives or wants to facilitate them in the future
Level: Advanced

Aino Corry is a teacher, a technical conference editor and retrospectives facilitator. She holds a masters degree and a ph.d. in computer science. She has 12 years of experience with Patterns in Software Development, and 13 years of experience in facilitating retrospectives. She also teaches how to teach Computer Science to teachers, and thus lives up to the name of her company; Metadeveloper. In her spare time, she runs and sings (but not at the same time).
Maren Baermann
Aino Vonge Corry
Maren Baermann
Talk: Di 7.1-1
Aino Vonge Corry
Talk: Di 7.1-2
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 7.3
Leader, Mentor, Coach: 3 Roles of a Software Architect
Leader, Mentor, Coach: 3 Roles of a Software Architect

As architects become more senior, we are expected to contribute to growing the product, the organization, and the people. This session explores three roles of an architect that help them meet these expectations: architect as leader, as mentor, as coach. This session offers practical tools, methods, and frameworks that help both experienced and aspiring architects succeed in each of these roles.

Target Audience: Architects, engineers, developers, managers, senior/principal/distinguished engineers
Prerequisites: Curiosity about how architects can be effective leaders, mentors, and coaches
Level: Advanced

Ken Power is an architect, engineering leader, consultant, researcher, coach, and educator. He works with large, global technology organizations to start, grow, and transform organizations, improving their product and service delivery capability, and helping them be more effective and joyful businesses. Ken has authored more than 35 peer-reviewed publications on software engineering topics He was co-editor of the 2019 IEEE Software special issue on Large-Scale Agile Development.
Ken Power
Ken Power
Talk: Di 7.3
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09:00 - 10:30
Do 6.1
How Cognitive Biases and Ranking can Foster an Ineffective Architecture and Design
How Cognitive Biases and Ranking can Foster an Ineffective Architecture and Design

The power of collaborative modelling comes from having a diverse group of people who, together, have a lot of wisdom. The problem here is we don’t actually listen to all the available input and perspectives due to cognitive biases and ranking. If we aren't aware of that it kills those insights and wisdom and kills the effectiveness of your models! In this talk where we will explore how we can improve our facilitation skills and focus on neuro-inclusiveness with using Deep Democracy in our design process.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Decision Makers, CTO, Tech Leads, designers, facilitators
Prerequisites: Facilitating or doing collaborate modelling
Level: Expert

Extended Abstract:
The power of collaborative modelling comes from having a diverse group of people who, together, have a lot of wisdom and knowledge. You would expect that all this knowledge will be put to use, co-creating, and to design a model. In reality, we don’t actually listen to all the available input and perspectives due to cognitive biases and ranking. Because not everything that needs to be said has been said, we will end up with sub-optimal models and architecture. Even worse, people don’t feel part of the solution and don’t commit to it. Good architecture and design need all the insights and perception. If we are not aware, cognitive biases and ranking kills those insights and wisdom and kills the effectiveness of your models!

Join us in this talk where we will interactively explore how we can improve our facilitation skills and focus on neuro-inclusiveness with Lewis Deep Democracy (LDD). By having a Deep Democratic discussions together on what biases are at play during liberating structures workshops, and how ranking will effect a visual collaborative modelling session like EventStorming and User Story Mapping, you will gain first-hand experience about LDD. With this experience, we will explain how we embedded LDD in our design processes. We will let you leave with the knowledge on how to observe sabotage behaviour, battle oppression, and to create safety in exploring alternative perceptions. We will show you how you can really let the group say what needs to be said and take a collective autocratic decision in designing your software models.

Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
Evelyn van Kelle is a strategic software delivery consultant, with experience in coaching, advising and guiding organisations and teams in designing socio-technical systems.
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle
Talk: Do 6.1
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14:30 - 15:30
Do 6.3
Problem? What Problem? Practice Collaborative Problem-solving?
Problem? What Problem? Practice Collaborative Problem-solving?

orking in teams we face problems in our daily work. As a team, we should be able to solve problems collaboratively. Agile calls these problems impediments.

Impediments can be something in the way of working, processes, tools, or organizational rules or structures. They can also be something cultural or structural.

In this mini-workshop we'll practice solving an impediment as a team. Next, we'll explore how we solved it, how we worked together. What hindered and helped us. We'll learn what we can do to collaborate better.

Target Audience: Scrum masters, tech leads, agile coaches, consultants, developers, testers, managers, CxOs
Prerequisites: Some experience of working in teams
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
This is a hands-on mini-workshop about collaborative problem-solving. It will be an interactive session where people work together to solve a problem in a kind of role-play. Next, we'll explore the behaviors that arose, focusing on what helps and hinders collaboration.

I'll kick it off by presenting problem-solving techniques and tips for collaborative problem-solving and dealing with impediments.

I'll ask the audience to split up in groups of around 5-7 people sitting close together. In each group, 3-5 people will do a role play where they work on a problem, where 2 people will be observing. If time permits we'll rotate solving two impediments.

Next, the observers will share what they saw happening where the group discusses this.

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality, and Continuous Improvement. As an adviser, trainer, and coach, he helps organizations with effectively deploying software development and management practices. He focuses on continuous improvement, collaboration and communication, and professional development, to deliver business value to customers.

Ben is an active member of networks on Agile, Lean, and Quality, and a well-known speaker and author.


Ben Linders
Ben Linders
Talk: Do 6.3
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