CONFERENCE PROGRAM OF 2021

Please note:
On this site, there is only displayed the English speaking sessions of the OOP 2021 Digital. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

Theme: Soft Skills/Social Skills

Sort by Tracks
Sort by Themes
Alle ausklappen
  • Monday
    08.02.
  • Tuesday
    09.02.
  • Wednesday
    10.02.
  • Thursday
    11.02.
  • Friday
    12.02.
, (Monday, 08.February 2021)
10:00 - 13:00
Mo 3
Retrospectives Antipatterns
Retrospectives Antipatterns

Retrospectives are indispensable for continuous learning and improvement in Lean, Agile, DevOps, and other contexts. But too many organizations run retrospectives “in name only,” and fail to generate the value they promise. In this tutorial, Aino introduces common antipatterns that undermine the effectiveness of retrospectives, and shows exactly how to overcome each of them.

In a mixture of short presentations and activities we will look at body language, psychology behind retrospectives, online retrospectives, types of retrospectives, etc.

Target Audience: Facilitators, project leaders, managers, coaches, team leaders, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: Have facilitated retrospectives or wants to facilitate them in the future
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Using the familiar “patterns” approach, she introduces antipatterns related to team and meeting structure, inadequate or counterproductive planning, human interaction, and much more. From “blaming and naming” to too much smalltalk, negativity to cultural disconnects in distributed teams, Aino reveals traps she’s encountered in leading hundreds of retrospectives – and presents proven solutions. With her insights and guidance, you can run retrospectives that deliver actionable improvements and concrete value — not just once, but over and over again.

Aino Corry is a teacher, a technical conference editor and retrospectives facilitator. She holds a masters degree and a ph.d. in computer science. She has 12 years of experience with Patterns in Software Development, and 13 years of experience in facilitating retrospectives. She also teaches how to teach Computer Science to teachers, and thus lives up to the name of her company; Metadeveloper. In her spare time, she runs and sings (but not at the same time).
Aino Vonge Corry
Aino Vonge Corry
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

10:00 - 13:00
Mo 4
Booked up Less Illusion Through Inclusion: Inspiration From the Field of Creativity on Hearing All the Voices!
Less Illusion Through Inclusion: Inspiration From the Field of Creativity on Hearing All the Voices!

Let’s reflect on the value of variety for avoiding blind spots. For this, we’ll explore some barriers we face when encountering different viewpoints. We’ll practice ways to change perspectives & build on others’ opinions. And we’ll take a look at how small changes in attitude can benefit all of us.

There will be input on general foundations for healthy & productive teams, like psychological safety & having a “good mix” (e.g. in culture, function & gender). We’ll also develop ways to ensure that these rich inputs are applied to a common goal.

Maximum number of participants: 25

Target Audience: Leaders, Developers, Managers, Teamplayers
Prerequisites: Curiosity and willingness to challenge one's own habits
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Some of us have been privileged enough to usually have their voice heard, when they spoke up. That often happened at the price of others not being listened to, their needs and opinions being disrespected and the effects on their wellbeing being ignored. These injustices have been committed across vocations, generations, intentions and cultures. One common denominator for these wrongs is the inability to change perspective. So, let’s start by flexing and training that muscle!

As an introduction to my workshop I will give some input on how I define a healthy team. To me, this has to do with psychological safety and including different views. I will speak about some factors that determine and enable psychological safety, basically that it is safe to show yourself vulnerable. Once we can bring our authentic selves to the table, we need to be seen. This in turn requires the others to be able to change perspective. If we don’t achieve this, we will always risk having huge blind spots, as our own experiences, skills, opinions and backgrounds determine how we perceive our environment.

I will demonstrate the effect of having blind spots with 2-3 fun exercises and reflect the learnings with the participants. We will map this with findings from research on how our cultural backgrounds shape our perception.

In creativity and innovation, we use a range of tools that help people consider different perspectives and look at problems from several angles. I will share some examples and discuss the benefits they bring and how these can be applied outside of creativity workshops.

Then I will outline three concepts I apply in my work: separating different types of thinking, unconditional appreciation and appreciative inquiry. The participants will apply this in an interactive simulation which involves stating an opinion, changing perspective and reflecting on the effects of this.

Finally, I will provide some insights from the field of creativity on how to train our ability to change perspectives and what evaluation and judgment do to our flexibility and our capacity for inclusion.

If the situation warrants it (and the participants wish for it), I will include suggestions how to incorporate the workshop learnings for remote settings.

You will learn

1. why teams need psychological safety and a “good mix” to be healthy,
2. to watch out for some barriers to open minded and inclusive habits and
3. how to train your abilities to change perspectives and be more inclusive.

Maren Baermann ( Dipl. Psych & M.S. Creative Studies) is an innovation psychologist with a passion for agility & innovation culture. To her the key to sustainable growth for any organization is the ability to think novel & solution-oriented, then apply the insights gained in an agile manner. This always begins with people. That’s why she specialized in enabling people, through creativity workshops, innovation team-buildings, soft-skill seminars & measures to foster an agile innovation culture.
Maren Baermann
Maren Baermann
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 1
Being Agile with Architecture Decisions: A Short Workshop on Architecture Decision Records
Being Agile with Architecture Decisions: A Short Workshop on Architecture Decision Records

Some architecture decisions are more consequential and higher impact than others, and need to be preserved. We work on systems where the architecture is too large for each person to hold all the details in their head. New team members struggle to understand what they need to know about the architecture. Current team members have challenges knowing what architecture decisions were made, by whom, and for what reason. Architecture Decision Records (ADRs) are a useful, agile, lightweight approach to tackling these, and other challenges.

Target Audience: Anyone who affects, or is affected by architecture decisions
Prerequisites: Some experience in software design and architecture would be beneficial
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Are you working on a system where the architecture is too large for each person on the team to hold all the details in their head for all time? Do new team members struggle to understand what they need to know about the architecture? Do current team members have challenges in knowing what architecture decisions were made, by whom, and for what reason? Some architecture decisions are more consequential and higher impact than others, and need to be preserved.

The right level of architecture documentation supports agility. Architecture Decision Records (ADRs) are a useful, lightweight approach for this. Often no more than a page in length, they capture the key decisions that we need to remember. This hands-on session shares experiences with ADRs, giving you a set of tools to be successful in your team.

Through this interactive session we will explore these questions together:

What are Architecture Decision Records (ADRs) and why are they useful?
How do ADRs promote or help agility?
What are the motivations that led to trying ADRs for preserving decisions?
What are some scenarios and examples where ADRs are helpful?
What kinds of decisions should we record with ADRs, and why?
What are some of the cultural challenges associated with using ADRs, and how do we address them?

This session provides participants with hands-on practice of creating and reviewing ADRs. The session draws from experiences with multiple large-scale, global organisations and system architectures, and builds on established work with ADRs from other authors and practitioners.

Ken Power is a software engineering professional with more than 20 years’ experience implementing software systems and building agile teams and organizations. He is currently developing AI-enabled systems for self-driving cars and intelligent autonomous systems.
Ken Power
Ken Power
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Tuesday, 09.February 2021)
09:00 - 10:45
Di 7.1
No Blame – More Flame! How Learning from Mistakes Can Help Us Thrive in Complexity
No Blame – More Flame! How Learning from Mistakes Can Help Us Thrive in Complexity

If you’re not making mistakes, you have no chance to learn enough! This is especially true in complex situations, where, more often than not, the difference between a success and a failure can only be seen in hindsight. Which is why it pays off to dare new things, even if that might mean you can go wrong–as long as you don’t make the same mistake twice!

In this interactive talk we will explore how psychological safety, creativity, complexity and motivation are connected. And we will exercise our “No Blame – More Flame” mentality.

Target Audience
: Testers, Developers, Leaders, Managers, Teamplayers
Prerequisites: Curiosity and willingness to challenge one's own habits
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Let’s remember, that in the beginning of IT and software development there was no chartered territory. There was no right or wrong path – great minds dared to venture on into new lands. And sometimes they failed. Spectacularly or subtle, with a chance of correction or at huge (monetary) sunk costs. But always with great learnings, albeit not always good documentation.

Yet in school and in life we often get punished for failures. And as a result, we learn that pointing the blame away from ourselves pays off. This is not only bad for the climate and culture in a team or in an organization, it is also detrimental when it comes to our ability to learn. Especially in uncertain and complex contexts, where this ability is crucial to survive and thrive. When we block our learning capabilities, we lose our powers to deal with the unknown, to adapt to new and emerging information, to explore solutions. This inhibits progress and kills motivation.

While most of the above facts are common sense or even common knowledge, it is quite hard to break the mental and behavioral habits we were taught throughout education and our work-lives.

In this talk I will summarize the concept of psychological safety and the effects of a psychologically safe culture on creativity and solution focus in teams. I will introduce a “tool” to adopt a more open-minded and learning focused mindset. The participants will get the opportunity to discuss how the tool can be applied in their individual contexts. Also, I will let the participants exercise a method which helps to change the interpretation of mistakes as something dangerous and evil to something viewed as valuable and helpful. The method uses failures as steppingstones to come up with improved solutions, which not only enhances the results but also lets us question our mistake-habits. Finally, I will wrap things up by speaking about how handling errors affects motivation.

Maren Baermann ( Dipl. Psych & M.S. Creative Studies) is an innovation psychologist with a passion for agility & innovation culture. To her the key to sustainable growth for any organization is the ability to think novel & solution-oriented, then apply the insights gained in an agile manner. This always begins with people. That’s why she specialized in enabling people, through creativity workshops, innovation team-buildings, soft-skill seminars & measures to foster an agile innovation culture.
Human Beings in Retrospectives - Body Language and Psychology
Human Beings in Retrospectives - Body Language and Psychology

When facilitating retrospectives, there is often a focus on the agenda, the activities and the experiments you take away from the retrospective. Also, there might be a technical theme for the retrospective, but the people and the process for cooperation and communication is often what you end up discussing.

I will provide you with tips and tricks for how to avoid neglecting the human aspect of your retrospectives; the trust, the different personality types, the feeling of safety, and what you can pick up from the body language.

Target Audience: Facilitators, project leaders, managers, coaches, team leaders, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: Have facilitated retrospectives or wants to facilitate them in the future
Level: Advanced

Aino Corry is a teacher, a technical conference editor and retrospectives facilitator. She holds a masters degree and a ph.d. in computer science. She has 12 years of experience with Patterns in Software Development, and 13 years of experience in facilitating retrospectives. She also teaches how to teach Computer Science to teachers, and thus lives up to the name of her company; Metadeveloper. In her spare time, she runs and sings (but not at the same time).
Maren Baermann
Aino Vonge Corry
Maren Baermann
Talk: Di 7.1-1

Vortrag Teilen

Aino Vonge Corry
Talk: Di 7.1-2
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

15:00 - 15:45
KeyDi2
KEYNOTE: How to Talk to the Elephant
KEYNOTE: How to Talk to the Elephant

In speaking about better ways of thinking and problem-solving, Linda has introduced Jonathan Haidt's model for the brain. He proposes that the rational, conscious mind is like the rider of an elephant (the emotional, unconscious mind) who directs the animal to follow a path. In Fearless Change, the pattern Easier Path recommends making life easier to encourage reluctant individuals to adopt a new idea. Linda suggests that in conversations with others who see the world differently, we "talk to the elephant" instead of the "rider." That is, don't use logic or facts, but appeal to the emotional brain of the resistor as well as making the path more attractive. There is always the question: What's the best way to talk to the elephant? This presentation will provide some answers. Listeners will learn the best elephant-speak based on the latest research in cognitive neuroscience and also hear suggestions for providing an Easier Path.

Linda Rising is an independent consultant who lives near Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in object-based design metrics. Her background includes university teaching as well as work in telecommunications, avionics, and tactical weapons systems. She is an internationally known presenter on topics related to agile development, patterns, retrospectives, the change process, and the connection between the latest neuroscience and software development. Linda is the author of numerous articles and five books. Her web site is: lindarising.org
Linda Rising
Linda Rising
Track: Keynote
Talk: KeyDi2
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

16:15 - 17:15
Di 7.3
Leader, Mentor, Coach: 3 Roles of a Software Architect
Leader, Mentor, Coach: 3 Roles of a Software Architect

As architects become more senior, we are expected to contribute to growing the product, the organization, and the people. This session explores three roles of an architect that help them meet these expectations: architect as leader, as mentor, as coach. This session offers practical tools, methods, and frameworks that help both experienced and aspiring architects succeed in each of these roles.

Target Audience: Architects, engineers, developers, managers, senior/principal/distinguished engineers
Prerequisites: Curiosity about how architects can be effective leaders, mentors, and coaches
Level: Advanced

Ken Power is a software engineering professional with more than 20 years’ experience implementing software systems and building agile teams and organizations. He is currently developing AI-enabled systems for self-driving cars and intelligent autonomous systems.
Ken Power
Ken Power
Talk: Di 7.3
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Wednesday, 10.February 2021)
09:00 - 10:30
Mi 2.1
Managing Polarities in Software Design and Engineering
Managing Polarities in Software Design and Engineering

Do you find yourself, or your team facing unsolvable problems? Problems that start to polarise and get decided by the people with the most rank? Or the majority vote decided and it resolves in a split in the team or in people feeling left out, or excluded? Perhaps you find yourself excluded from a team or company? Polarities cannot be solved, only managed. With polarity mapping we manage that polarity and go from either-or thinking to both-and thinking, and this way includes the entire team in managing that polarity.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Decision Makers, CTO, Tech Leads, designers, facilitators
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Do you find yourself, or your team facing unsolvable problems? Problems that start to polarise and get decided by the people with the most rank? Or the majority vote decided and it resolves in a split in the team or in people feeling left out, or excluded? Perhaps you find yourself excluded from a team or company? And the moment you think you solved it they come back again. The thing is, polarisations like these cannot be solved, like breathing in and breathing out but need to be managed. If we don't, we will make compromises or stay in one polarity and experience the downside of both. To identify and manage polarities, we need to discuss and start using polarity mapping.

In this session, we will interactively expose you to polarity thinking. We will explore how to identify polarities and how we can start managing them with Barry Johnson Polarity Mapping. We will take a common polarity in software design, like too much vs too little upfront design, mob/pair programming vs programming in isolation, and planning vs taking action. By filling in the polarity map together, we show you the power of visualisation to manage the polarity. We will go from either-or thinking to both-and thinking, and this way includes the entire team in managing that polarity.

Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
Evelyn van Kelle is a strategic software delivery consultant, with experience in coaching, advising and guiding organisations and teams in designing socio-technical systems.
Gien Verschatse, a software developer with 10 years of experience, mainly in a .NET environment, who likes to start her day with coffee. She specialises in bridging the gap between users and developers by practicing domain driven design. Besides that she loves to learn how teams can improve the way they make decisions both on a technical and organisational level. She is a strong believer of continuously learning by deliberate practice and knowledge sharing, which is why she dedicates a lot of her free time speaking at conferences or user groups.She also helps to organise an F# conference in the US, Open FSharp. When she is not busy with all of the above, you will find her on the sofa, reading a book (yes, with coffee).
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle, Gien Verschatse
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle, Gien Verschatse
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

17:00 - 18:00
Mi 2.4
Real Cross-functional Teams for Creating real and better Products
Real Cross-functional Teams for Creating real and better Products

At the core of agile development are self-organizing cross-functional teams. Yet, this is often understood as e.g. backend & front-end developers working together. If an organization is aiming for company-wide agility, to fully benefit from agility it has to enable teams as value centers that are truly cross-functional by bringing in different perspectives from business, markets, cultures, beliefs etc. This way cross-functional teams overcome not only the limitations of organizational silos but also of a singular view on the market.

Target Audience: Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers, in general everyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Too many products have been developed that serve one kind of client only. The reason is that the composition of the teams leads (subconsciously) to the development of products that serve only people that resemble the people in the team. One “famous” example is the soap dispenser that only works if your hands are white.

If teams are really cross-functional and are resembling the diversity of the market, the products they’re creating are also better. Thus, if the whole team has the full business expertise, knows the market, reflects the full diversity of the clients, then it can even disrupt the market and isn’t waiting for some person (e.g. the Product Owner) to decide on priorities. With this real cross-functionality the team can fully understand the company’s business and has a holistic view of it, knowing its contribution to the company’s value stream.

Real cross-functional teams are an essential building block for implementing company-wide agility and the organization benefits by creating better and in a way more real products and by having more options when entering the war of talent.

Jutta Eckstein arbeitet weltweit als Business-Coach, Change-Manager & Beraterin. Ihr Fokus liegt auf unternehmensweiter Agilität in großen & verteilten Organisationen. Sie war von 2003-2007 im Vorstand der AgileAlliance. Sie hat einen M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, einen Dipl.-Ing. in Product-Engineering & ist als Immissionsschutzbeauftragte (Umweltschutz) zertifiziert. Jutta wurde 2011 von der Computerwoche in die Top 100 der bedeutendsten Persönlichkeiten der Deutschen IT gewählt.
Maryse Meinen is a scrum master and agile coach, helping people uncover better ways.
Spreading the love for true empiricism and for dancing the BOSSA nova is her focus for 2021

Jutta Eckstein, Maryse Meinen
Jutta Eckstein, Maryse Meinen
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

17:00 - 18:00
Mi 6.4
D.A.R.E. More, F.E.A.R. Less - How Journaling Puts Leadership in ACTion
D.A.R.E. More, F.E.A.R. Less - How Journaling Puts Leadership in ACTion

"How is a diary connected with leadership?" and "how can this change our future?" you might be wondering.

In this session you will get some answers. You will benefit from my extensive experience with (business) journaling. And you will be introduced to psychological science that makes written self-reflection so powerful.

So...

- You want live up to YOUR values?

- You want to change habits in your life's "departments"?

- You want to harvest outstanding outcomes - at work and beyond?

YES?

Then join and get ready for leadership in ACTion!

Target Audience
: Developers, Architects, System Engineers, Managers of all kind, human beings ;-)
Prerequisites: Curiosity and openness for new ways of thinking
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
During my career in IT and people development I had several turning points where I either was made to use journaling techniques or experimented with them myself to successfully tackle the next challenge.

Over the years some turning points "beyond business" in life followed. Also I got serious scientific foundations in my psychological studies. Having both - the science and my experience - I started reflecting why those 'written self-reflection' techniques are so powerful and – at the same time – they are still quite rarely used in the business context.

This session is suitable for all humans: curious journaling newcomers as well as seasoned written-reflection experts as I'll share my story, more than 10 years of experience and actionable tips and techniques.

Cosima Laube is an experienced independent coach, consultant and trainer with a proven track record in a variety of industries (automotive, finance & banking, healthcare, travel & tourism, public sector).
Having a strong background as developer and people lead in software engineering, over the last 10+ years, Cosima enhanced her portfolio with solid coaching skills and university studies focused on I/O and Health Psychology. Her credo at work and in life is: Achieving MORE - together!
Cosima Laube
Cosima Laube
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Thursday, 11.February 2021)
09:00 - 10:30
Do 6.1
How Cognitive Biases and Ranking can Foster an Ineffective Architecture and Design
How Cognitive Biases and Ranking can Foster an Ineffective Architecture and Design

The power of collaborative modelling comes from having a diverse group of people who, together, have a lot of wisdom. The problem here is we don’t actually listen to all the available input and perspectives due to cognitive biases and ranking. If we aren't aware of that it kills those insights and wisdom and kills the effectiveness of your models! In this talk where we will explore how we can improve our facilitation skills and focus on neuro-inclusiveness with using Deep Democracy in our design process.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Decision Makers, CTO, Tech Leads, designers, facilitators
Prerequisites: Facilitating or doing collaborate modelling
Level: Expert

Extended Abstract:
The power of collaborative modelling comes from having a diverse group of people who, together, have a lot of wisdom and knowledge. You would expect that all this knowledge will be put to use, co-creating, and to design a model. In reality, we don’t actually listen to all the available input and perspectives due to cognitive biases and ranking. Because not everything that needs to be said has been said, we will end up with sub-optimal models and architecture. Even worse, people don’t feel part of the solution and don’t commit to it. Good architecture and design need all the insights and perception. If we are not aware, cognitive biases and ranking kills those insights and wisdom and kills the effectiveness of your models!

Join us in this talk where we will interactively explore how we can improve our facilitation skills and focus on neuro-inclusiveness with Lewis Deep Democracy (LDD). By having a Deep Democratic discussions together on what biases are at play during liberating structures workshops, and how ranking will effect a visual collaborative modelling session like EventStorming and User Story Mapping, you will gain first-hand experience about LDD. With this experience, we will explain how we embedded LDD in our design processes. We will let you leave with the knowledge on how to observe sabotage behaviour, battle oppression, and to create safety in exploring alternative perceptions. We will show you how you can really let the group say what needs to be said and take a collective autocratic decision in designing your software models.

Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
Evelyn van Kelle is a strategic software delivery consultant, with experience in coaching, advising and guiding organisations and teams in designing socio-technical systems.
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle
Talk: Do 6.1
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

14:30 - 15:30
Do 6.3
Problem? What Problem? Practice Collaborative Problem-solving?
Problem? What Problem? Practice Collaborative Problem-solving?

Working in teams we face problems in our daily work. As a team, we should be able to solve problems collaboratively. Agile calls these problems impediments.

Impediments can be something in the way of working, processes, tools, or organizational rules or structures. They can also be something cultural or structural.

In this mini-workshop we'll practice solving an impediment as a team. Next, we'll explore how we solved it, how we worked together. What hindered and helped us. We'll learn what we can do to collaborate better.

Maximum number of participants: 60

Target Audience: Scrum masters, tech leads, agile coaches, consultants, developers, testers, managers, CxOs
Prerequisites: Some experience of working in teams
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
This is a hands-on mini-workshop about collaborative problem-solving. It will be an interactive session where people work together to solve a problem in a kind of role-play. Next, we'll explore the behaviors that arose, focusing on what helps and hinders collaboration.

I'll kick it off by presenting problem-solving techniques and tips for collaborative problem-solving and dealing with impediments.

During the session, we'll split up into groups using breakout rooms. In each group, a part of the attendees will do a role play where they work on a problem, where others will be observing how this goes. If time permits, we'll rotate solving two impediments.

Next, the observers will share what they saw happening where the group discusses this.

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality, and Continuous Improvement. As an adviser, trainer, and coach, he helps organizations with effectively deploying software development and management practices. He focuses on continuous improvement, collaboration and communication, and professional development, to deliver business value to customers. Ben is an active member of networks on Agile, Lean, and Quality, and a well-known speaker and author.


Ben Linders
Ben Linders
Talk: Do 6.3
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

17:00 - 18:00
Do 3.4
Transformation Burnout. Will Your Groundhog day be any different this time?
Transformation Burnout. Will Your Groundhog day be any different this time?

Picture burnout as a system where you have multiple variables and details to combine:

Expectations, rules, routines, emotions and workload.

Now add Agile Transformation where all of the above are present. And see a receipt for personal disaster.

Agile Transformations play a big role in my experience, for I have seen many of them both as a professional coach and a team member in a transforming organization. Being burned out, on the edge and enduring burnout.

The session is a case with steps I have uncovered in serving teams and myself.

Target Audience: Managers, Decision Makers, Leaders, Coaches
Prerequisites: Team working experience, leadership experience
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Picture burnout as a system.
Now add Agile Transformation.
And see a receipt for personal disaster.

Change of structure, roles, policies, and, most importantly – expectations. This is where humans suffer the most, and where coaches can help the most if we are sufficiently equipped.

There is an individual burnout that occurs due to the pressure that you exert on yourself – this is very common among those who are perfectionists (CEOs or CIOs in our context).

There is also interpersonal attrition, which is caused by complicated work relationships (can you imagine working alone on your routine tasks and now being in a team with that particular person you dreaded for decades?)

And finally, there is organizational exhaustion, which is caused by poor organization and unrealistic demands made on you by others (the tremendous top-down start of transformation).

Transformation missions where coaches are hired to observe, lead, encourage others to mastery, and set up daily routines and ceremonies. Is there more?

First of all, hence you are in a coaching position, your main task is not to have a strong opinion from day one, rather download, expand your perception filter, connect emotionally and act from an open heart.

The session aims at providing the toolkit to those in transformation and those in burnout. We will use Theory U practices, personal resilience coaching, and emotional intelligence assessments. To see how these combine with leadership and agile coaching on a daily basis and very hands-on activities.

My name is Anna and I am an Agile Coach. For the past decade I was exploring wins, losses, tools, and techniques to thrive in project management which led me, surprisingly to Agile. I am working with aspiring and seasoned leaders, new teams, and one in transformation and gained experience in multiple domains, 50+ projects, 5 countries and 3 formats of work. I developed 6 online programs and regularly conduct webinars and workshops, produce videos and podcast and host meetups. Let's talk!
Anna Lavrova
Anna Lavrova
Talk: Do 3.4
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

18:30 - 20:00
Ndo 2
Flow - A New Way To Estimate Work And Coach Teams
Flow - A New Way To Estimate Work And Coach Teams

Haven’t we been there – working extremely focused on an interesting solution that we forgot to eat, sleep and finally finish after many hours had passed. That mental state – when we reach the height of our abilities - is called Flow.

In the 1st part of this session, you will learn about Flow and experience ways to help others raise their chance to reach Flow.

In the 2nd part you will learn a new way to estimate work based on “Flow-Theory”. This #newestimate can jump-start conversations, improve performance and help you coach your team.

Target Audience: Scrum Masters, Agile Coaches, Team Leads, Managers, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge on regular ways to estimate work, some experience with coaching might be helpful
Level: Advanced

Markus Wissekal ist das, was man als agiles Taschenmesser beschreiben könnte: Kanban-Trainer, Scrum Professional, LSP Facilitator, systemischer Coach, Medizininformatiker sowie Unternehmensberater.
Markus Wissekal
Markus Wissekal
Talk: Ndo 2
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

, (Friday, 12.February 2021)
09:00 - 16:00
Fr 6
(AUSGEBUCHT) Enabling Whole Team Quality as a Tester in an Agile Team
(AUSGEBUCHT) Enabling Whole Team Quality as a Tester in an Agile Team

Agile testers need to lead the team, other testers, product owners and customers towards better quality. Yet agile teams don’t generally bestow formal authority. And, as testers, we’re often trying to lead from a position that is still not always appreciated.

The workshop will focus on hands-on exercises and activities for achieving enablement for whole team quality. No programming skills are necessary, but we will be doing some work involving code in groups and in a safe learning environment.

Maximum Number of participants: 12

Target Audience: Testers, developers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
The role of a tester on an agile team is so much more than “hey can you test this with your super testing skills”. Testers are, on the one hand, chameleons who need to adapt their skills to new situations within the team. On the other hand, we can’t just react to situations – we need to lead the team, other testers, product owners and customers towards better quality. Yet agile teams don’t generally bestow formal authority. And, as testers, we’re often trying to lead from a position that is still not always appreciated (“agile teams don’t need testers”, “testers are just bad developers”, “you’re just a tester”…).

In complex situations where we’re dealing with unknown unknowns plus sticky, messy humans, communication is key. A degree in psychology would sometimes be helpful. Multiple years of cat-herding too. In this workshop, Alex will focus on communication.

The workshop will consist of the following topics:

- Communicating the value and role of testing

- Testers as the communication glue for various stakeholders and within the team: talking about  testing, risk and quality at the right level for the right audience

- Enablement: Teaching, coaching, coercing and encouraging others within the team to take on quality- related tasks and to support the value of the product through testing

- What testers and other team members can do together, resulting in better and more efficient results

The workshop will focus on hands-on exercises and activities. No programming skills are necessary, but we will be doing some work involving code in groups and in a safe learning environment.

Alex Schladebeck ist eine Testerin aus Leidenschaft. Ihr Herz schlägt für Qualität, Agilität und ihre Mitmenschen. Sie ist Geschäftsführerin und Leiterin der Qualitätssicherung bei der Bredex GmbH.

In diesen Rollen unterstützt sie Kollegen, Kunden und Teams auf ihrer Reise, bessere Qualität zu liefern: in Produkten, in Prozessen und in der Kommunikation.

In früheren Rollen war sie für die Befähigung von Teams und qualitativ hochwertige Systeme verantwortlich. Nun befähigt sie andere, genau das zu machen, und sorgt für eine Umgebung in der Firma, wo jede(r) aufblühen kann.

Alex schaut mit neugierigen Tester-Augen auf die Welt und möchte immer dazu lernen. Sie teilt ihr Wissen und ihre Erfahrungen in Workshops, Coachings und als Sprecherin oder Keynote-Sprecherin auf Konferenzen.
Alex Schladebeck
Alex Schladebeck
flag EVENT MERKEN

Vortrag Teilen

back