CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Please note:
On this site, there is only displayed the English speaking sessions of the OOP 2021 Digital. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2021 Digital correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "VORTRAG MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

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10:00 - 13:00
Mo 3
Retrospectives Antipatterns
Retrospectives Antipatterns

Retrospectives are indispensable for continuous learning and improvement in Lean, Agile, DevOps, and other contexts. But too many organizations run retrospectives “in name only,” and fail to generate the value they promise. In this tutorial, Aino introduces common antipatterns that undermine the effectiveness of retrospectives, and shows exactly how to overcome each of them.

In a mixture of short presentations and activities we will look at body language, psychology behind retrospectives, online retrospectives, types of retrospectives, etc.

Target Audience: Facilitators, project leaders, managers, coaches, team leaders, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: Have facilitated retrospectives or wants to facilitate them in the future
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Using the familiar “patterns” approach, she introduces antipatterns related to team and meeting structure, inadequate or counterproductive planning, human interaction, and much more. From “blaming and naming” to too much smalltalk, negativity to cultural disconnects in distributed teams, Aino reveals traps she’s encountered in leading hundreds of retrospectives – and presents proven solutions. With her insights and guidance, you can run retrospectives that deliver actionable improvements and concrete value — not just once, but over and over again.

Aino Corry is a teacher, a technical conference editor and retrospectives facilitator. She holds a masters degree and a ph.d. in computer science. She has 12 years of experience with Patterns in Software Development, and 13 years of experience in facilitating retrospectives. She also teaches how to teach Computer Science to teachers, and thus lives up to the name of her company; Metadeveloper. In her spare time, she runs and sings (but not at the same time).
Aino Vonge Corry
Aino Vonge Corry
Talk: Mo 3
flag EVENT MERKEN
10:00 - 13:00
Mo 4
Less Illusion Through Inclusion: Inspiration From the Field of Creativity on Hearing All the Voices!
Less Illusion Through Inclusion: Inspiration From the Field of Creativity on Hearing All the Voices!

Let’s reflect on the value of variety for avoiding blind spots. For this, we’ll explore some barriers we face when encountering different viewpoints. We’ll practice ways to change perspectives & build on others’ opinions. And we’ll take a look at how small changes in attitude can benefit all of us.

There will be input on general foundations for healthy & productive teams, like psychological safety & having a “good mix” (e.g. in culture, function & gender). We’ll also develop ways to ensure that these rich inputs are applied to a common goal.

Target Audience: Leaders, Developers, Managers, Teamplayers
Prerequisites: Curiosity and willingness to challenge one's own habits
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Some of us have been privileged enough to usually have their voice heard, when they spoke up. That often happened at the price of others not being listened to, their needs and opinions being disrespected and the effects on their wellbeing being ignored. These injustices have been committed across vocations, generations, intentions and cultures. One common denominator for these wrongs is the inability to change perspective. So, let’s start by flexing and training that muscle!

As an introduction to my workshop I will give some input on how I define a healthy team. To me, this has to do with psychological safety and including different views. I will speak about some factors that determine and enable psychological safety, basically that it is safe to show yourself vulnerable. Once we can bring our authentic selves to the table, we need to be seen. This in turn requires the others to be able to change perspective. If we don’t achieve this, we will always risk having huge blind spots, as our own experiences, skills, opinions and backgrounds determine how we perceive our environment.

I will demonstrate the effect of having blind spots with 2-3 fun exercises and reflect the learnings with the participants. We will map this with findings from research on how our cultural backgrounds shape our perception.

In creativity and innovation, we use a range of tools that help people consider different perspectives and look at problems from several angles. I will share some examples and discuss the benefits they bring and how these can be applied outside of creativity workshops.

Then I will outline three concepts I apply in my work: separating different types of thinking, unconditional appreciation and appreciative inquiry. The participants will apply this in an interactive simulation which involves stating an opinion, changing perspective and reflecting on the effects of this.

Finally, I will provide some insights from the field of creativity on how to train our ability to change perspectives and what evaluation and judgment do to our flexibility and our capacity for inclusion.

If the situation warrants it (and the participants wish for it), I will include suggestions how to incorporate the workshop learnings for remote settings.

You will learn

1. why teams need psychological safety and a “good mix” to be healthy,
2. to watch out for some barriers to open minded and inclusive habits and
3. how to train your abilities to change perspectives and be more inclusive.

Maren Baermann ( Dipl. Psych & M.S. Creative Studies) is an innovation psychologist with a passion for agility & innovation culture. To her the key to sustainable growth for any organization is the ability to think novel & solution-oriented, then apply the insights gained in an agile manner. This always begins with people. That’s why she specialized in enabling people, through creativity workshops, innovation team-buildings, soft-skill seminars & measures to foster an agile innovation culture.
Maren Baermann
Maren Baermann
Talk: Mo 4
flag EVENT MERKEN
10:00 - 13:00
Mo 5
Future Testing with Built-in Quality
Future Testing with Built-in Quality

We know that quality cannot be tested into our products afterwards, but we typically could do much more in our testing approach to built-in quality right from the beginning. But how does this look like in practice?

This interactive tutorial provides practical guidance on the needed strategies, tactics, and practices in different areas, and shares experiences and lessons learned to do better testing in the future!

Maximum number of participants: 25

Target Audience: Test Architects, Software Architects, Test Engineers, Product Owners, Quality Managers, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge about testing and quality engineering
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Today we have to deal with shorter time-to-market, increasing complexity and more agility while keeping quality and other key system properties high. Our test systems increase in size, volume, flexibility, velocity, complexity and unpredictability. Additionally, digitalization requires more than just a face lift in testing.

We know that quality cannot be tested into our products afterwards, but we typically could do much more in our testing approach to built-in quality right from the beginning:

  • This means even an improvement to classical defect prevention: defect prevention is good, but just “avoiding” some defects does not mean that we build something really “right”.
  • This is more than just the trendy shift-left approach in DevOps.

But how does this look like in practice?

This interactive tutorial provides practical guidance on the needed strategies, tactics, and practices in different areas, and shares experiences and lessons learned:

  • Requirements and test-driven approaches (xTDD)
  • Utility trees and quality models
  • Scenario descriptions and test design techniques
  • Design strategies and design tactics
  • Design for Testability and test architectures
  • Mindset by example

Attend this tutorial and do not only learn what built-in quality really means but be enabled to apply the strategies, tactics, and practices as a major lever for better testing in the future!

Peter Zimmerer is a Principal Key Expert Engineer at Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, in Munich, Germany. For more than 25 years he has been working in the field of software testing and quality engineering. He performs consulting, coaching, and training on test management and test engineering practices in real-world projects and drives research and innovation in this area. As ISTQB® Certified Tester Full Advanced Level he is a member of the German Testing Board (GTB). Peter has authored several journal and conference contributions and is a frequent speaker at international conferences.

Peter Zimmerer
Peter Zimmerer
Talk: Mo 5
flag EVENT MERKEN
10:00 - 13:00
Mo 6
ReasonReact für typsichere Web-Apps
ReasonReact für typsichere Web-Apps

Statische Typsysteme sind im Frontend angekommen! Anders als das populäre Typescript geht ReasonML - die Sprache des React-Erfinders Jordan Walke - noch einen Schritt weiter und bringt eine funktionale Programmiersprache in den Browser.

Mit der Sprache kommt die Neudefinition des React-Frameworks: ReasonReact. ReasonReact bietet einen typsicheren Weg, um Komponenten in einer JSX-ähnlichen Syntax zu erstellen.

Inhalte des Workshops:

  • Modellieren mit dem Typsystem
  • Frontend in ReasonReact
  • Unit-Tests in bs-jest

Maximale Teilnehmerzahl: 12

Teilnehmer:innen benötigen vorab auf ihrem lokalen Rechner ein lauffähiges Node.JS und Visual Studio Code.

Zielpublikum: Entwickler:innen, Architekt:innen, Frontender
Voraussetzungen: Grundlagen der Webentwicklung, eigenes Notebook mit NodeJS und Git
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Fortgeschritten

Extended Abstract:
Statische Typsysteme sind im Frontend angekommen! Populär wurden sie dank Typescript und Flow. ReasonML - die Sprache des React-Framework-Erfinders Jordan Walke - geht noch einen Schritt weiter und bringt eine funktionale Programmiersprache aus der ML-Familie in den Browser. ReasonML kombiniert die Semantik von OCaml mit der gängigen Syntax von JavaScript.

Mit der Sprache kommt die Neudefinition des populären React-Frameworks: ReasonReact. ReasonReact verwirklicht endlich die ursprüngliche Vision des React-Schöpfers - ein voll auf funktionale Programmierung ausgerichtetes Frontend-Framework! Das Framework ist bereits mit Hooks und Reducern ausgestattet. Es bietet außerdem einen typsicheren Weg, um Komponenten in einer JSX-ähnlichen Syntax zu erstellen - ohne die Notwendigkeit einer Überspezifizierung, dank Reasons ausgezeichneter Typ-Inferenz.

In diesem Workshop

  • werfen wir einen Blick auf die Konzepte der Sprache ReasonML.
  • modellieren wir eine Domäne mit dem algebraischen Typsystem.
  • erstellen wir eine einfache Frontend-Anwendung in ReasonReact.
  • schreiben wir Unit-Tests mit bs-Jest.
Marco Emrich ist Senior Consultant bei codecentric und leidenschaftlicher Verfechter von Software Craft und Codequalität. Er hält regelmäßig Vorträge auf bekannten Konferenzen und ist Autor mehrerer Fachbücher. Wenn Marco nicht gerade Entwicklertreffen organisiert, erklärt er seinem Sohn wahrscheinlich gerade, wie man Roboterschildkröten programmiert.
Marco Emrich
Marco Emrich
Talk: Mo 6
flag EVENT MERKEN
11:30 - 12:00
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

13:00 - 14:00
Lunch Break
Lunch Break
Lunch Break

14:00 - 17:00
Mo 10
Distilling Design Heuristics by Modelling
Distilling Design Heuristics by Modelling

How can we get better as software designers? By becoming more aware of our design heuristics and intentional as we cultivate and refine them. Heuristics aid in the design and even determine our attitude and behavior. We each have our own set of heuristics that we have acquired through reading, practice, and experience. In this session, you are presented with a modelling problem that you will try to design in groups. Let us share these heuristics during a modelling session!

Maximum number of participants: 24

Target Audience: Software Architects, Senior Developers
Prerequisites: Senior developers and architects
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
How can we get better as software designers? By becoming more aware of our design heuristics and intentional as we cultivate and refine them. Heuristics aid in the design and even determine our attitude and behavior. For example, agile developers value frequent feedback and decomposing larger design problems into smaller, more manageable chunks that they design and test as they go. We each have our own set of heuristics that we have acquired through reading, practice, and experience. Let us share these heuristics during a modelling session!

In this session, you are presented with a modelling problem that you will try to design in groups. During designing, we will rotate observers that will capture and map heuristics they see happening. Once everyone observed the group will share and discuss the heuristics they observed. Finally, we will wrap-up with the whole group explaining and sharing the key heuristics used in each group.

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock is an object design pioneer who invented the set of design practices known as Responsibility-Driven Design (RDD). Along the way she authored two popular object design books that are still in print.
Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Kenny Baas-Schwegler
Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Kenny Baas-Schwegler
Talk: Mo 10
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 12
Really Simple Reactive Architecture and Programming
Really Simple Reactive Architecture and Programming

Applications, services, and systems are changing out of necessity because of the kinds of platforms that are available today: distributed and multi-core. Have you been curious about Reactive Architecture and Programming but haven't had time to dig in? Join this session.

Maximum number of participants: 75

Target Audience: Architects and Developers
Prerequisites: Java Programming
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Applications, services, and systems are changing out of necessity because of the kinds of platforms that are available today: distributed and multi-core. Have you been curious about Reactive Architecture and Programming but haven't had time to dig in? Join this session and you will be in a good position to put Reactive to use on your projects. We will start from foundational building blocks and scale up to full Reactive implementations. If you bring your laptop and Java 1.8+ or C# for .NET Core 2.1+ you can try out Reactive during the session.

Vaughn Vernon is an entrepreneur, software developer, and architect with more than 35 years of experience in a broad range of business domains. Vaughn is a leading expert in Domain-Driven Design and Reactive, and champions simplicity. He consults and teaches around Domain-Driven Design and Reactive software development, helping teams and organizations realize the potential of business-driven and reactive systems as they transform from technology-driven legacy web implementation approaches. Vaughn is the author of three best-selling books published by Pearson/Addison-Wesley, and has been commissioned by them as the curator and editor of his own Vaughn Vernon Signature Series.
Vaughn Vernon
Vaughn Vernon
Talk: Mo 12
flag EVENT MERKEN
14:00 - 17:00
Mo 14
Introduction to Functional Programming
Introduction to Functional Programming

Functional programming is the future of software development. As software gets ever more complex, unintended side effects flourish - you push on one side, and something unexpected squirts out the other. Functional programming cuts down on complexity through high-level abstractions, and avoids unintended side effects through pure functions. The result is simple and elegant code that captures the essence of the problem you're trying to solve. Fortunately, functional programming is easy to learn, and this tutorial will get you started.

Maximum number of participants: 48

To follow along with the tutorial, we recommend that you download the Racket software:
https://racket-lang.org/
If you use your OS's package manager to install Racket, make sure you install its IDE, DrRacket

Target Audience: Developers, architects
Prerequisites: Basic programming knowledge
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Functional programming is the logical continuation of object-oriented programming: OOP managed to encapsulate mutable state with the goal of ultimately eliminating it one day, and functional programming finally realizes that vision. Language implementations have been mature and robust for many years now, and the practical functional languages - Haskell, OCaml, Scala, Clojure, F#, Racket, Erlang, Elixir, Swift - all have thriving communities and ecosystems. Moreover, decades of experience and research teaching functional programming have produced effective didactic approaches that enable anyone into programming to easily get into FP. The time to get started is now!

Michael Sperber is CEO of Active Group in Tübingen, Germany. Mike specializes in functional programming, and has been an internationally recognized expert in the field: He has spoken at the top conferences in programming languages, authored many papers on the subject as well as several books. Moreover, he is an expert on teaching programming.
Michael Sperber
Michael Sperber
Talk: Mo 14
flag EVENT MERKEN
15:30 - 16:00
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 1
Being Agile with Architecture Decisions: A Short Workshop on Architecture Decision Records
Being Agile with Architecture Decisions: A Short Workshop on Architecture Decision Records

Some architecture decisions are more consequential and higher impact than others, and need to be preserved. We work on systems where the architecture is too large for each person to hold all the details in their head. New team members struggle to understand what they need to know about the architecture. Current team members have challenges knowing what architecture decisions were made, by whom, and for what reason. Architecture Decision Records (ADRs) are a useful, agile, lightweight approach to tackling these, and other challenges.

Target Audience: Anyone who affects, or is affected by architecture decisions
Prerequisites: Some experience in software design and architecture would be beneficial
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Are you working on a system where the architecture is too large for each person on the team to hold all the details in their head for all time? Do new team members struggle to understand what they need to know about the architecture? Do current team members have challenges in knowing what architecture decisions were made, by whom, and for what reason? Some architecture decisions are more consequential and higher impact than others, and need to be preserved.

The right level of architecture documentation supports agility. Architecture Decision Records (ADRs) are a useful, lightweight approach for this. Often no more than a page in length, they capture the key decisions that we need to remember. This hands-on session shares experiences with ADRs, giving you a set of tools to be successful in your team.

Through this interactive session we will explore these questions together:

What are Architecture Decision Records (ADRs) and why are they useful?
How do ADRs promote or help agility?
What are the motivations that led to trying ADRs for preserving decisions?
What are some scenarios and examples where ADRs are helpful?
What kinds of decisions should we record with ADRs, and why?
What are some of the cultural challenges associated with using ADRs, and how do we address them?

This session provides participants with hands-on practice of creating and reviewing ADRs. The session draws from experiences with multiple large-scale, global organisations and system architectures, and builds on established work with ADRs from other authors and practitioners.

Ken Power is an architect, engineering leader, consultant, researcher, coach, and educator. He works with large, global technology organizations to start, grow, and transform organizations, improving their product and service delivery capability, and helping them be more effective and joyful businesses. Ken has authored more than 35 peer-reviewed publications on software engineering topics He was co-editor of the 2019 IEEE Software special issue on Large-Scale Agile Development.
Ken Power
Ken Power
Talk: Nmo 1
flag EVENT MERKEN
18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 3
Reinventing HR - From Resource to Relations Management
Reinventing HR - From Resource to Relations Management

A high number of business transformation programs doesn’t seem to succeed. Most studies point to major gaps in culture, leadership and change competencies. What really seems to be missing is competence in people and culture. While at the same time the traditional HR (Human Resources) function has come under pressure, possibly filling the gap seems to be the perfect fit. This session not only offers insights into options for the new role of HR, but also applicable tools for starting the journey right away.

Target Audience:
HR Manager, HR Business Partners, Coaches, Line Managers, All Stakeholders of HR
Prerequisites: Experience or insights regarding business transformation and respective challenges
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
A high number of business transformation programs doesn’t seem to succeed. Most studies point to major gaps in culture, leadership and change competencies. What really seems to be missing is competence in people and culture. While at the same time the traditional HR (Human Resources) function has come under pressure, possibly filling the gap seems to be the perfect fit. This session not only offers insights into options for the new role of HR, but also applicable tools for starting the journey right away.

Most transformation initiatives do not really care for two functions - Finance and HR. Interesting enough, from our experience, if supported, these two functions seem to be the key levers. Not being supported they often turn out to be the key obstacles. A highly dynamic and disruptive economy has been challenging business as usual. New ways of working made many HR tasks obsolete to be primarily driven from a central place. And at the same time, the people and culture factors remained a big challenge. Who else, if not those, who have been educated in people topics, could help to survive and thrive from this perspective.

However, in order to be able doing so, traditional HR needs to rethink, reorganize and reposition itself. It needs to move away from treating people as resources and focus on fostering relations instead. This session is designed for providing triggers to do so. The session is highly interactive, leads groups of participants through several tools towards investigating challenges and co-creating these new opportunities.

Mike Leber is an international Executive Consultant and Agile Coach with more than 25 years experience in the field. His work is dedicated to new types of Adaptive Organizations, fit for the 21st century, delivering awesome products and services. He has been working with large international groups as well as in the startup domain. Together with his clients he designs innovative and collaborative spaces for delivering fresh business models. He regularly speaks at international conferences and events, where you can meet him across the globe. Get in touch, if you like to take a step towards fresh approaches for management, leadership, service delivery and change.
Mike Leber
Mike Leber
Talk: Nmo 3
flag EVENT MERKEN
18:30 - 20:00
Nmo 5
Strangle Your Legacy Code
Strangle Your Legacy Code

Given an ancient codebase that makes refactoring risky and expensive, how do you clear a path to continued delivery? The old wisdom says the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The next best time to preserve your software investment is today: plant a Strangler, a pattern for reaping continuous value from your existing system while growing new functionality alongside it.

We'll test-drive new features into a real legacy system. You'll leave with a powerful strategy for extending the useful life of valuable software.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Testers, Product Managers
Prerequisites: Familiarity with refactoring and legacy code; preference for learning-by-doing
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Given an ancient codebase that makes refactoring risky and expensive, how do you clear a path to continued delivery? The old wisdom says the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, and the next best time is today. But if you already have a gnarled old source tree, preserve your software investment by planting a Strangler: a pattern for reaping continuous value from your existing system while growing new functionality alongside it.

We'll take a quick look at a Strangler and the basics of Mob Programming, then work together to test-drive new features into the system. You'll leave with a powerful strategy for extending the useful life of working, valuable software -- especially when it's hard to change -- and with a free bonus development practice to accelerate your team's learning. For a limited time only!

Amitai Schleier is an independent software development coach, legacy code wrestler, non-award-winning musician, and award-winning bad poet. He publishes fixed-length micropodcasts at Agile in 3 Minutes, writes variable-length articles at schmonz.com, and contributes to notable open-source projects such as NetBSD, pkgsrc, ikiwiki, and qmail. Amitai’s music and puns have been tolerated at the International Rachmaninoff Conference and the Alfred Joyce Kilmer Memorial Bad Poetry Contest.
Amitai Schleier
Amitai Schleier
Talk: Nmo 5
flag EVENT MERKEN
09:00 - 10:45
Di 3.1
I Have 99 Problems - Where Do I Start? The Theory of Constraints Applied
I Have 99 Problems - Where Do I Start? The Theory of Constraints Applied

35 years ago, Eliyahu Goldratt introduced the Theory of Constraints (ToC) in his seminal book "The Goal" as a new management paradigm for manufacturing plants, struggling with excess inventory, late deliveries, poor quality. The ToC solved this through five focusing steps - a guideline to systematic improvement and continuous learning.

Today, the ToC is one of the pillars of the DevOps movement. This talk will present its principles, and how it applies to the software industry, through a mix of theory, stories and experiences, and practical advice.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leaders, Managers, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Some previous knowledge of software delivery is helpful, but not required
Level: Basic

Tobias Goeschel started his career as a freelance web developer in 1997, and has since worked on hundreds of projects in many roles, contexts, and industries.

Having found a home as consultant, crafter and coach at codecentric in 2014, he strives to help customers to build and improve not only their product, but also how it is made.

He is a passionate advocate for collaborative work environments, knowledge sharing, and diversity.

Thierry De Pauw is an Engineer at the fintech startup PaxFamilia.

On the side, he founded ThinkingLabs where he advises organisations in the adoption of Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery.

Thierry is a lean software engineer, junior ops engineer, CI/CD advocate and jack-of-all-trades with a passion to help teams create meaningful software, with a keen eye for code quality and the software delivery process, from customer interaction to continuous delivery. Instead of balancing quality and delivery, he believes and practices, that better quality is actually a way to more and better deliveries.

Lean Quality Management – How to Integrate Quality Assurance into Scaled Agile Projects
Lean Quality Management – How to Integrate Quality Assurance into Scaled Agile Projects

This talk will provide insights for a successful integration of lean-quality management to scaled agile projects. We will show based on our project experience that by improving process quality, higher product quality is achieved, resulting in significantly increased customer satisfaction. We will share how the lean principles and an easy-to-use toolkit helped us to tackle complex problems by providing a proven and scalable approach for continuous improvement and boost business agility at the same time.

Target Audience:
Quality & Test Engineers, Agile Coaches, Project Managers, Quality Managers
Prerequisites: Solid agile knowledge, basic lean understanding, basic understanding of quality assurance
Level: Advanced

Thomas Karl is a lean-agile, program and C-Level Coach with 10+ years of experience in complex large-scale delivery projects. He helps clients to harness the power of disruption with Lean QM.
Bettina Hillringhaus is a Lean QM expert with focus on complex large-scale agile SAP S/4HANA delivery projects. She has deep knowledge in test automation, QM & test automation strategy and quality architecture.
Tobias Goeschel, Thierry de Pauw
Thomas Karl, Bettina Kathrin Hillringhaus
Tobias Goeschel, Thierry de Pauw
Talk: Di 3.1-1
Thomas Karl, Bettina Kathrin Hillringhaus
Talk: Di 3.1-2
flag EVENT MERKEN
09:00 - 10:30
Di 4.1
Dancing the BOSSA Nova – How to Bring a Culture of Experimentation into Your Company
Dancing the BOSSA Nova – How to Bring a Culture of Experimentation into Your Company

This workshop gives a short introduction to BOSSA nova (Beyond Budgeting, Open Space, Sociocracy and Agile combined to support company-wide agility), but is mainly very interactive, supported by various Liberating Structures.

It helps the participants to identify and refine their biggest challenges in the agile transformation in their organization and provides a structure in which they can create and improve a probe that they can start with when back in office.

A practical workshop for probe-sense-responding.

Target Audience: No exclusions, everyone can make a small step
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Edwin Burgers is working in IT for 20+ years in various roles from developer to agile consultant. Since 2009 he supports teams and organizations to become more effective and nimble.
Maryse Meinen is a scrum master and agile coach, helping people uncover better ways.
Spreading the love for true empiricism and for dancing the BOSSA nova is her focus for 2021

Edwin Burgers, Maryse I. Meinen
Edwin Burgers, Maryse I. Meinen
Talk: Di 4.1
flag EVENT MERKEN
09:00 - 10:45
Di 7.1
No Blame – More Flame! How Learning from Mistakes Can Help Us Thrive in Complexity
No Blame – More Flame! How Learning from Mistakes Can Help Us Thrive in Complexity

If you’re not making mistakes, you have no chance to learn enough! This is especially true in complex situations, where, more often than not, the difference between a success and a failure can only be seen in hindsight. Which is why it pays off to dare new things, even if that might mean you can go wrong–as long as you don’t make the same mistake twice!

In this interactive talk we will explore how psychological safety, creativity, complexity and motivation are connected. And we will exercise our “No Blame – More Flame” mentality.

Target Audience
: Testers, Developers, Leaders, Managers, Teamplayers
Prerequisites: Curiosity and willingness to challenge one's own habits
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Let’s remember, that in the beginning of IT and software development there was no chartered territory. There was no right or wrong path – great minds dared to venture on into new lands. And sometimes they failed. Spectacularly or subtle, with a chance of correction or at huge (monetary) sunk costs. But always with great learnings, albeit not always good documentation.

Yet in school and in life we often get punished for failures. And as a result, we learn that pointing the blame away from ourselves pays off. This is not only bad for the climate and culture in a team or in an organization, it is also detrimental when it comes to our ability to learn. Especially in uncertain and complex contexts, where this ability is crucial to survive and thrive. When we block our learning capabilities, we lose our powers to deal with the unknown, to adapt to new and emerging information, to explore solutions. This inhibits progress and kills motivation.

While most of the above facts are common sense or even common knowledge, it is quite hard to break the mental and behavioral habits we were taught throughout education and our work-lives.

In this talk I will summarize the concept of psychological safety and the effects of a psychologically safe culture on creativity and solution focus in teams. I will introduce a “tool” to adopt a more open-minded and learning focused mindset. The participants will get the opportunity to discuss how the tool can be applied in their individual contexts. Also, I will let the participants exercise a method which helps to change the interpretation of mistakes as something dangerous and evil to something viewed as valuable and helpful. The method uses failures as steppingstones to come up with improved solutions, which not only enhances the results but also lets us question our mistake-habits. Finally, I will wrap things up by speaking about how handling errors affects motivation.

Maren Baermann ( Dipl. Psych & M.S. Creative Studies) is an innovation psychologist with a passion for agility & innovation culture. To her the key to sustainable growth for any organization is the ability to think novel & solution-oriented, then apply the insights gained in an agile manner. This always begins with people. That’s why she specialized in enabling people, through creativity workshops, innovation team-buildings, soft-skill seminars & measures to foster an agile innovation culture.
Human Beings in Retrospectives - Body Language and Psychology
Human Beings in Retrospectives - Body Language and Psychology

When facilitating retrospectives, there is often a focus on the agenda, the activities and the experiments you take away from the retrospective. Also, there might be a technical theme for the retrospective, but the people and the process for cooperation and communication is often what you end up discussing.

I will provide you with tips and tricks for how to avoid neglecting the human aspect of your retrospectives; the trust, the different personality types, the feeling of safety, and what you can pick up from the body language.

Target Audience: Facilitators, project leaders, managers, coaches, team leaders, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: Have facilitated retrospectives or wants to facilitate them in the future
Level: Advanced

Aino Corry is a teacher, a technical conference editor and retrospectives facilitator. She holds a masters degree and a ph.d. in computer science. She has 12 years of experience with Patterns in Software Development, and 13 years of experience in facilitating retrospectives. She also teaches how to teach Computer Science to teachers, and thus lives up to the name of her company; Metadeveloper. In her spare time, she runs and sings (but not at the same time).
Maren Baermann
Aino Vonge Corry
Maren Baermann
Talk: Di 7.1-1
Aino Vonge Corry
Talk: Di 7.1-2
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10:30 - 11:00
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

12:00 - 14:00
Lunch Break
Lunch Break
Lunch Break

14:00 - 14:45
Di 2.2
The Art of the Necessary
The Art of the Necessary

How much can you separate what you are building from how you are building it? This becomes an increasingly relevant question with IT moving from building systems to cultivating ecosystems. At the enterprise architecture level, one of the challenges nowadays is to decide which constraints to put in place to get a robust and evolvable landscape of interacting components, while at the same time it is important to minimize these constraints so that teams and units have some autonomy, and that the overall architecture can evolve continuously.

Target Audience: Interest in enterprise & software architecture and in digital transformation
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
In this presentation, we look at this interesting challenge from the standpoint of APIs, and how they can help to reduce the constraints to the necessary ones, while still resulting in an effective architecture.

One of the main challenges of enterprise architecture and software architecture today is to move from building systems to cultivating ecosystems. With business and IT moving closer together, and the demands on businesses to become better at changing and adapting, this introduces new constraints into architecture that looked different when the main goals were mostly centered around being secure, robust, and efficient.

Ecosystems exhibit different qualities from systems in the sense that they afford more autonomy to components, while at the same time introducing models of fitness and continuous change. With today's demand on business and IT to become faster and more effective at changing, the question is how to reflect those demands in new practices and models for architecting. We argue that one way of doing this is to focus on constraints, and to also focus on minimizing the constraints so that components can adapt and evolve as freely as possible.

We present a model of how to address API issues in the four areas of strategy, program, platform, and products. The goal of this model is to have as much coordination and alignment between these areas as necessary. The way this is done is by having clearly structured guidelines that represent and communicate the constraints, and that always clearly explain the rationale, the constraint itself, as well as possible ways how to comply with the constraint and how to test for compliance. The goal of this is to create loose coupling while still having a structure that allows governance. While in practice it would be ideal to fully automate all tests so that governance can be done in a full self-service model, so far we have concluded that automated testing is a good goal to have, but that some constraints still need a process of human review and approval.

Erik Wilde works in the Axway Catalyst team and focuses on API strategy, API programs, and API platforms. His main goal is to make sure that organizations make the right decisions when it comes to using APIs as the foundation of their digital transformation initiatives. Erik has a Ph.D. from ETH Zurich, is the author of many articles, papers, and books, is a frequent speaker at global API events, and contributes to standardization activities to help improving the way how APIs are designed, managed, and used.
Erik Wilde
Erik Wilde
Talk: Di 2.2
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 4.2
The Extended Business Model Canvas (EBMC) - Leveraging a Startup-Tool to an Enterprise-Artifact
The Extended Business Model Canvas (EBMC) - Leveraging a Startup-Tool to an Enterprise-Artifact

The Extended Business Model Canvas (EBMC) links Lean Portfolio Management, System Thinking, Lean Product development, and agile development in a way suitable for established enterprises, not just startups.

Two additional components, the "Contribution to Strategy" and "Technical Debt," apply now to both operational and development values. Those components are supported by two special lenses that help agile teams to connect better, align, and achieve more business agility.

Target Audience: Architects, Business Owners, Portfolio Managers, Product Managers, POs, SMs, Agile Teams
Prerequisites: Scaled Agile Frameworks
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The business model canvas (BMC) developed by Osterwalder and Pigneur explains "how value is created, delivered and captured from an organizational perspective." The BMC excels through the addition of the simple yet effective Value Proposition Canvas (VPC). The BMC combined with the VPC unfolds the driving powers and key pivot points along the operational value stream. It is a valuable Business Agility artifact increasing transparency along the operational value stream.

To link development value streams to operational value streams, it is helpful to abandon the greenfield approach and extend the BMC by to additional components.

The two extensions are "Contribution to the Strategy" and "Technical Debt." Nearly every epic has to legitimate its strategic fit for purpose in a more transparent way. Technical debt is also a matter that has to be dealt with transparently, as it seldom will disappear in the short term.

In this interactive presentation, the participants will learn how the EBMC can be used to help our clients to thrive in the digital age. Depending on the level of audience participation, this will range from a presentation based on the Corona-Warn-App as a use case to an audience-specific workshop.

The secret sauce is: how do we break down Strategy and Technical debt. The presentation shows how these two components can be examined generically to increase transparency.

We do this in three steps:

#1
Recap the application of the BMC and VPC. Let us lookout for some pitfalls when dealing with a more complex intake when there is some ambiguity between the operational and development value stream and the mapping of funding to ARTs. We usually see this when there is a complex mashup between value streams, reverse demand, and regular business, BAU IT-demand, and multiple ARTs.

#2
We add "Contribution to the Strategy" to the BMC to map the complex intake described in #1 and link the greenfield BMC with strategic themes and the portfolio level to integrate the various usually concurring stakeholders.

#3
We add "Technical Debt" to enable the program layer to better participate in environments with complex interwoven system landscapes and numerous different components and platforms.

Kurt Cotoaga started as a research assistant using evolutionary algorithms to solve np-hard problems. Those fascinating problems are still unsolved ...
His first pivot brought him into the product manager role for large online brokerage web sites where he fooled himself and others into mixing up causality and correlation. It was a tough ride in the epicenter of the dot-com bubble burst ...
Having been perpetually torn apart between trying to create business value and pretending to be predictable, he pivoted around 2005 towards agility as a survival kit. From projects via programs to portfolios via products - this finally worked!
The last pivot beamed him into the consulting world, where he helps clients to thrive in the digital age as a Business Value addicted Digitalization Evangelist.
Kurt Cotoaga
Kurt Cotoaga
Talk: Di 4.2
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 8.2
Back to the Data - Now That We (Machine) Learned From Test Results, What Else Did We Gain?
Back to the Data - Now That We (Machine) Learned From Test Results, What Else Did We Gain?

80% of machine learning is said to be data wrangling. Is all this wasted effort? Hardly - often the journey really is its own reward.

In this talk, we'll briefly describe a machine learning project that predicts the outcome of test cases in a large-scale software development cycle. We'll then show what we gained from collecting the necessary data and how these insights can have lasting impact on the day-to-day work of developers, testers and architects. This includes a quick answer to the well-known question: Whose defect is it anyway?

Target Audience
: Developers, Testers, Architects
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of software development and testing and an interest in data analytics
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract
:
Data science folk wisdom holds that at least 80% of machine learning consists of data wrangling, i.e. finding, integrating, annotating, and cleaning the necessary data.

While sometimes viewed as less "glorious" than the deployment of powerful models, this journey has its own rewards as well.

Benefits may sometimes be somewhat expectable, if still non-trivial, like data cleaning potentially exposing errors in underlying data bases.

In other cases, though, there may be some low-hanging fruit a casual glance might miss even though they are indeed rewarding.

Data integration often reveals opportunities for statistical analyses that are relatively simple, but may still have high impact.

In this talk, we'll start at the destination: the result of a machine learning project where we successfully predicted test results from code changes.

A necessary task was the integration of several data sources from the full software development cycle - from code to testing to release in a large industry project with more than 500 developers.
Naturally, this required all typical steps in the data science cycle: building up domain knowledge and problem understanding, both semantic and technical data integration, data base architecture and administration, machine learning feature design, model training and evaluation, and communicating results to stakeholders.

These steps yielded several benefits, on which we will focus in our talk.

Among others these include data quality insights (e.g. about actual "back to the future" timestamps), and new analyses which were made possible by a unified view of the data (e.g. survival analysis of defects).

Last but not least, we demonstrate a simple answer to a well-known question, especially in larger software development contexts: Whose defect is it anyway - how can we avoid assigning defects to teams that have nothing to do with them?

Thanks to the integrated information sources from systems concerned with version control, test result logging, and defect management, we are able to support the claims made in this talk with statistics taken from 6 years of real-world data.

Gregor Endler holds a doctor's degree in Computer Science for his thesis on completeness estimation of timestamped data. His work at codemanufaktur GmbH deals with Machine Learning and Data Analysis.
Marco Achtziger is Test Architect working for Siemens Healthcare GmbH in Forchheim. He has several qualifications from iSTQB and iSQI and is a certified Software Architect by Siemens AG.
Gregor Endler, Marco Achtziger
Gregor Endler, Marco Achtziger
Talk: Di 8.2
flag EVENT MERKEN
15:00 - 15:45
KeyDi2
How to Talk to the Elephant
How to Talk to the Elephant

In speaking about better ways of thinking and problem-solving, Linda has introduced Jonathan Haidt's model for the brain. He proposes that the rational, conscious mind is like the rider of an elephant (the emotional, unconscious mind) who directs the animal to follow a path. In Fearless Change, the pattern Easier Path recommends making life easier to encourage reluctant individuals to adopt a new idea. Linda suggests that in conversations with others who see the world differently, we "talk to the elephant" instead of the "rider." That is, don't use logic or facts, but appeal to the emotional brain of the resistor as well as making the path more attractive. There is always the question: What's the best way to talk to the elephant? This presentation will provide some answers. Listeners will learn the best elephant-speak based on the latest research in cognitive neuroscience and also hear suggestions for providing an Easier Path.

Linda Rising is an independent consultant who lives near Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in object-based design metrics. Her background includes university teaching as well as work in telecommunications, avionics, and tactical weapons systems. She is an internationally known presenter on topics related to agile development, patterns, retrospectives, the change process, and the connection between the latest neuroscience and software development. Linda is the author of numerous articles and five books. Her web site is: lindarising.org
Linda Rising
Linda Rising
Track: Keynote
Talk: KeyDi2
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15:45 - 16:15
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

16:15 - 17:15
Di 1.3
Fundamental IDEALS for Modeling Microservices
Fundamental IDEALS for Modeling Microservices

SOLID principles are well-known for designing object-oriented systems. But what if you are developing microservices? IDEALS, is yet another silly mnemonic acronym and are the core principles for microservice design. The acronym stands for: Interface segregation, Deployability, Event-driven, Availability over consistency, Low Coupling, and Single responsibility. We will relate these IDEALS to techniques, tools, technologies, and domain modeling principles we use today to develop modern service-based distributed systems (microservices).

Target Audience: English, Developers, Architects, QAs, Testers, Product Owners, Managers
Prerequisites: Basic Understanding of architecture and microservices and familiarity with domain modeling
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:

It's been seven years since we've started creating microservices. Practice has shown what design principles give you a sound foundation for a successful microservice architecture. Join us in this session to find out what they are, and how to realize them. For OO systems, Robert Martin compiled the five SOLID principles. For designing microservice-based solutions, we propose developers follow the "IDEALS":  

(I) Interface segregation tells us that different types of clients (e.g., mobile apps, web apps, CLI programs) should be able to interact with services through the contract that best suits their needs. 

(D) Deployability (is on you) acknowledges that in the microservice era, which is also the DevOps era, there are critical design decisions and technology choices developers need to make regarding packaging, deploying and running microservices. 

(E) Event-driven suggests that whenever possible we should model our services to be activated by an asynchronous message or event instead of a synchronous call. 

(A) Availability over consistency reminds us that more often end users value the availability of the system over strong data consistency, and they're okay with eventual consistency. 

(L) Loose-coupling remains an important design concern in the case of microservices, with respect to afferent (incoming) and efferent (outgoing) coupling. 

(S) Single responsibility is the idea that enables modeling microservices that are not too large or too slim because they contain the right amount of cohesive functionality. 

We will relate these IDEALS to techniques, tools, technologies and domain modeling principles we use today to develop modern service-based distributed systems (microservices).

Paulo Merson has been programming in the small and programming in the large for over 25 years. Paulo is a software developer at the Brazilian Federal Court of Accounts. He is a Visiting Scientist with the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) and is also a certified instructor for SOASchool and a faculty member of the master program in Applied Computing at University of Brasilia. Paulo often delivers professional training to software developers in the US, Latin America, and Europe.
Joseph (Joe) Yoder is president of the Hillside Group and principle of The Refactory. He is best known as an author of the Big Ball of Mud pattern, illuminating fallacies in software architecture. Joe teaches and mentors developers on agile and lean practices, architecture, flexible systems, clean design, patterns, refactoring, and testing. Joe has presented many tutorials and talks, arranged workshops, given keynotes, and help organized leading international agile and technical conferences.
Paulo Merson, Joe Yoder
Paulo Merson, Joe Yoder
Talk: Di 1.3
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 3.3
Decoupled Streaming Microservices Architecture with Apache Kafka, Kubernetes and Istio Service Mesh
Decoupled Streaming Microservices Architecture with Apache Kafka, Kubernetes and Istio Service Mesh

Apache Kafka became the de facto standard for microservice architectures. Decoupled applications and Domain-driven Design (DDD) are key benefits. However, that also introduces new challenges like observability of the whole ecosystem. This session explores the problems of distributed Microservices communication and how Kafka, Kubernetes and a Service Mesh like Istio address them. Learn some approaches for combining them to build a reliable and scalable microservice architecture with decoupled and secure microservices.

Target Audience: Software Architects, Consultants, Developers, Project Leads
Prerequisites: Experience with distributed systems / messaging frameworks is helpful
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Apache Kafka became the de facto standard for microservice architectures. It goes far beyond reliable and scalable high-volume messaging. In addition, you can leverage Kafka Connect for integration and the Kafka Streams API for building lightweight stream processing microservices in autonomous teams. Decoupled applications and Domain-driven Design (DDD) are key benefits. However, microservices also introduce new challenges like observability of the whole ecosystem.

A Service Mesh technology like Istio (including Envoy) complements the architecture. It describes the network of microservices that make up such applications and the interactions between them. Its requirements can include discovery, load balancing, failure recovery, metrics, and monitoring. A service mesh also often has more complex operational requirements, like A/B testing, canary rollouts, rate limiting, access control, and end-to-end authentication.

This session explores the problems of distributed Microservices communication and how both Apache Kafka and Service Mesh solutions address it together on top of Kubernetes. I cover different approaches for combining both to build a reliable and scalable microservice architecture with decoupled and secure microservices.

Kai Waehner is a Technology Evangelist at Confluent. He works with customers across the globe and with internal teams like engineering and marketing. Kai’s main area of expertise lies within the fields of Big Data Analytics, Machine Learning, Hybrid Cloud Architectures, Event Stream Processing and Internet of Things. 
Kai Wähner
Kai Wähner
Talk: Di 3.3
flag EVENT MERKEN
16:15 - 17:15
Di 4.3
What’s That Smell? – How Frustrations Over Different Kinds of Debt Guide Our Agile Transformation
What’s That Smell? – How Frustrations Over Different Kinds of Debt Guide Our Agile Transformation

Together with 100 IT engineers we have been given the freedom to figure out how to transform from doing traditional IT Operations to being agile.

We use Scrum@Scale and Heart of Agile to remove debt; Organizational Debt in the form of old leadership structures that create unclear mandate for scrum roles and prevents organizing around products; Technical Debt that keeps us busy maintaining old technologies and prevents the creation of relevant cloud infrastructure products.

Our story is about how to fuel change through addressing frustrations.

Target Audience: Managers, Coaches, decision makers, Project Leaders, Practitioners
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of agile frameworks and methodology
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
:
In 2017, we together with 100 IT engineers in an internal IT function of an old industrial company set out to transform our organization from being traditional and hierarchical to becoming agile. The fundamental premise was that the top management invited us to change and gave us freedom to figure out how we would accomplish this. In this process, we used different ‘compasses’ such as Scrum at Scale and Heart of Agile that on different levels helped us navigate what step to take next to facilitate the change.

What we have come to realize was that it has been our major frustrations that have helped us navigate with these compasses and make decisions, and that many of the sources for our frustrations have been different kinds of ‘debt’. Organizational debt in the form of ‘old’ leadership structures that created unclear mandate for scrum leader roles and prevented teams from organizing around products. Process debt shows itself in an ITIL operating mindset that kept us from reinventing ourselves as a ‘development organization’ with continuous deployment and end user focus. And technical debt kept us busy maintaining old technologies and systems and prevented focus on learning about the brave new world of ‘the cloud’ and creating new, relevant infrastructure products at high speed. So far our efforts have given us an unexpected happy ending, as even if we still have long way to go on to become truly agile, our changes so far prepared the organization for the unforeseeable: Covid-19.

Our talk is a reflecting experience report about the frustrations that we have met and acted on and on frustrations we are currently living with and trying to act on. It is about how we are slowly uncovering how the past is haunting the organization in so many ways – which is also the reason why the only way forward is a step-by-step process that cannot be planned up front.

We will provide examples from our past – where we have failed and succeeded but, most important, learned – and we will look forward at the challenges we have ahead of us in what we expect to be a 10 year journey towards an agile culture.

Anne Abell has a PhD in "IT project success" from Aarhus University in Denmark and has worked 9 years with the LEGO Group with infrastructure and cyber security strategy and agile transformation.
Rasmus Lund-Jensen has been with the LEGO Group for 6 years where he heads up the transformation in the infrastructure department.
Carsten Jakobsen has 20 years of experience working with agile in different organizations, supporting the LEGO Group for 2 years.
Anne Abell, Rasmus Lund-Jensen, Carsten Ruseng Jakobsen
Anne Abell, Rasmus Lund-Jensen, Carsten Ruseng Jakobsen
Talk: Di 4.3
flag EVENT MERKEN
16:15 - 17:15
Di 7.3
Leader, Mentor, Coach: 3 Roles of a Software Architect
Leader, Mentor, Coach: 3 Roles of a Software Architect

As architects become more senior, we are expected to contribute to growing the product, the organization, and the people. This session explores three roles of an architect that help them meet these expectations: architect as leader, as mentor, as coach. This session offers practical tools, methods, and frameworks that help both experienced and aspiring architects succeed in each of these roles.

Target Audience: Architects, engineers, developers, managers, senior/principal/distinguished engineers
Prerequisites: Curiosity about how architects can be effective leaders, mentors, and coaches
Level: Advanced

Ken Power is an architect, engineering leader, consultant, researcher, coach, and educator. He works with large, global technology organizations to start, grow, and transform organizations, improving their product and service delivery capability, and helping them be more effective and joyful businesses. Ken has authored more than 35 peer-reviewed publications on software engineering topics He was co-editor of the 2019 IEEE Software special issue on Large-Scale Agile Development.
Ken Power
Ken Power
Talk: Di 7.3
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17:15 - 17:45
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

17:45 - 18:45
Di 2.4
You Can't Put a Price on Architecture? Then Please Don't Call It Architecture!
You Can't Put a Price on Architecture? Then Please Don't Call It Architecture!

Architecture work is all about trade-offs. We weigh security against ease of use, we balance availability with maintainability and contrast performance with reliability. But how do we evaluate the cost and benefits of change? As architecture is a means to an end, not an end in itself, architectural improvements have to be governed by sound reasoning, and more often than not that has to be based on numbers. Which in turn implies the need for good practices for the financial evaluation of technical decisions. Here we'll explore a dozen of these.

Target Audience: Software architects, developers, managers
Prerequisites: Some experience with real world architectural and design decision (even without putting numbers on them)
Level: Advanced

After quite a while in software development in the last century Michael Mahlberg turned to consulting on software architecture and processes in general around the turn of the Millennium. Always with a strong focus on continuous improvement and sustainable change he now spends most of his time supporting clients in their quest for more effective ways to work, mostly by applying lean and agile concepts.
Michael Mahlberg
Michael Mahlberg
Talk: Di 2.4
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17:45 - 18:45
Di 3.4
Design Sprint Virtualization due to COVID-19
Design Sprint Virtualization due to COVID-19

We took advantage of the COVID digitalization challenge and converted our Design Sprints and UX workshops into a digital format. A dozen customer workshops in a wide variety of contexts (including logistics, public and chemical clients) have demonstrated UX workshops can also work virtualized with some advantages, e.g. being able to integrate participants from remote locations cost-effectively. In this session evaluated tools, techniques, best practices and lessons learned virtualizing UX workshops will be presented and discussed.

Target Audience: UX Practitioners, Business Analysts, Project Leaders, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Familiarity with regular onsite Design Sprints does help, although I will provide a short recap
Level: Advanced

Mr. Kulas main area of interest is the topic of usability / user experience. Mr. Kulas holds the IXQB CPUX-F and artop usability and user experience professional certifications, drives usability within Capgemini Germany and acts internally and externally as trainer for human-centered design methodologies.
Christian Kulas
Christian Kulas
Talk: Di 3.4
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17:45 - 18:45
Di 5.4
Domain Modelling in a Remote World
Domain Modelling in a Remote World

In an ever increasing need of remote work, we still need to envision new business models, explore our business processes and design our software systems. While nothing can replace the in person collaboration of an EventStorming, remote tools bring their own exciting upsides. During the lock down of the COVID-19 pandemic the DDD community experimented and distilled a collection of remote modelling methods. Let us together dive into some interesting trade-offs and find amazing new tools that carry us into the future.

Target Audience: Senior developers, Software Architects, Facilitators, Consultants, C*Os
Prerequisites: A basic understanding of why we model and how communication influences software would be good
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
:
We will explore remote EventStorming, remote Context Mapping with Bounded Context Canvas, architecture design and documentation emerging from and integrated into the model and many more.

Marco Heimeshoff is a trainer, speaker and software developer from Germany. He organizes KanDDDinsky, a conference about Domain-driven Design and the art of business software and co-founded the german DDD community in 2013 and VirtualDDD.com in 2019. Between consulting companies around the globe and his day job in building health care software, you'll find him speaking at conferences about DDD, socio-technical systems and first principles.
Marco Heimeshoff
Marco Heimeshoff
flag EVENT MERKEN
17:45 - 18:45
Di 6.4
D.A.R.E. More, F.E.A.R. Less - How Journaling Puts Leadership in ACTion
D.A.R.E. More, F.E.A.R. Less - How Journaling Puts Leadership in ACTion

"How is a diary connected with leadership?" and "how can this change our future?" you might be wondering.

In this session you will get some answers. You will benefit from my extensive experience with (business) journaling. And you will be introduced to psychological science that makes written self-reflection so powerful.

So...

- You want live up to YOUR values?

- You want to change habits in your life's "departments"?

- You want to harvest outstanding outcomes - at work and beyond?

YES?

Then join and get ready for leadership in ACTion!

Target Audience
: Developers, Architects, System Engineers, Managers of all kind, human beings ;-)
Prerequisites: Curiosity and openness for new ways of thinking
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
During my career in IT and people development I had several turning points where I either was made to use journaling techniques or experimented with them myself to successfully tackle the next challenge.

Over the years some turning points "beyond business" in life followed. Also I got serious scientific foundations in my psychological studies. Having both - the science and my experience - I started reflecting why those 'written self-reflection' techniques are so powerful and – at the same time – they are still quite rarely used in the business context.

This session is suitable for all humans: curious journaling newcomers as well as seasoned written-reflection experts as I'll share my story, more than 10 years of experience and actionable tips and techniques.

Cosima Laube is an experienced independent coach, consultant and trainer with a proven track record in a variety of industries (automotive, finance & banking, healthcare, travel & tourism).

Having a strong background as developer and people lead in software engineering, over the last 9 years, Cosima enhanced her portfolio with solid coaching skills and BSc studies focused on I/O and Health Psychology.
Cosima Laube
Cosima Laube
Talk: Di 6.4
flag EVENT MERKEN
09:00 - 10:30
Mi 2.1
Managing Polarities in Software Design and Engineering
Managing Polarities in Software Design and Engineering

Do you find yourself, or your team facing unsolvable problems? Problems that start to polarise and get decided by the people with the most rank? Or the majority vote decided and it resolves in a split in the team or in people feeling left out, or excluded? Perhaps you find yourself excluded from a team or company? Polarities cannot be solved, only managed. With polarity mapping we manage that polarity and go from either-or thinking to both-and thinking, and this way includes the entire team in managing that polarity.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Decision Makers, CTO, Tech Leads, designers, facilitators
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Do you find yourself, or your team facing unsolvable problems? Problems that start to polarise and get decided by the people with the most rank? Or the majority vote decided and it resolves in a split in the team or in people feeling left out, or excluded? Perhaps you find yourself excluded from a team or company? And the moment you think you solved it they come back again. The thing is, polarisations like these cannot be solved, like breathing in and breathing out but need to be managed. If we don't, we will make compromises or stay in one polarity and experience the downside of both. To identify and manage polarities, we need to discuss and start using polarity mapping.

In this session, we will interactively expose you to polarity thinking. We will explore how to identify polarities and how we can start managing them with Barry Johnson Polarity Mapping. We will take a common polarity in software design, like too much vs too little upfront design, mob/pair programming vs programming in isolation, and planning vs taking action. By filling in the polarity map together, we show you the power of visualisation to manage the polarity. We will go from either-or thinking to both-and thinking, and this way includes the entire team in managing that polarity.

Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
Evelyn van Kelle is a strategic software delivery consultant, with experience in coaching, advising and guiding organisations and teams in designing socio-technical systems.
Gien Verschatse, a software developer with 10 years of experience, mainly in a .NET environment, who likes to start her day with coffee. She specialises in bridging the gap between users and developers by practicing domain driven design. Besides that she loves to learn how teams can improve the way they make decisions both on a technical and organisational level. She is a strong believer of continuously learning by deliberate practice and knowledge sharing, which is why she dedicates a lot of her free time speaking at conferences or user groups.She also helps to organise an F# conference in the US, Open FSharp. When she is not busy with all of the above, you will find her on the sofa, reading a book (yes, with coffee).
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle, Gien Verschatse
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle, Gien Verschatse
Talk: Mi 2.1
flag EVENT MERKEN
09:00 - 10:30
Mi 3.1
Collaborative Modeling with Domain Experts Using Domain-Specific Languages
Collaborative Modeling with Domain Experts Using Domain-Specific Languages

Languages that raise the level of abstraction closer to the problem domain help improve quality and productivity. This can be best achieved when the language is directly based on the problem domain, not implementation concepts or existing languages. We describe how to create domain-specific languages in tight collaboration with domain expert users: as soon as a language concept is defined it can be immediately applied by users. We demonstrate this with examples from various fields, such as automotive, home electronics and automation systems.

Target Audience: Developers, subject matter/domain experts, managers
Prerequisites: experiences on applying some modeling language
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
This talk is based on industry experiences on applying domain terminology directly in a modeling language (in its grammar). This way domain experts can apply familiar terminology, and map the specifications directly to code, to other more technical models, or the same set of models are shared by both domain experts and developers. The talk starts with a practical example how domain experts from different fields can collaboratively edit the same specifications each having own background (industry process, software, hardware, communication). Next the talk describes guidelines how such languages can be created: how domain terminology is defined into a language and how such language can be applied. These guidelines are demonstrated with examples from practice, such as how functional safety engineers can collaborate using ISO26262 (functional safety standard) terminology and related them to the technical system development; and how UX and UI persons can define user interfaces and their behavior in a manner allowing developers to join and work with the same models. The talk is concluded with guidelines and hints backed by industry cases from companies like Panasonic and Elektrobit.

Dr. Juha-Pekka Tolvanen is CEO of MetaCase. He has been involved in domain-specific languages and tools since 1991 and acted as a consultant world-wide on their use in over 100 projects. Juha-Pekka has co-authored a book (Domain-Specific Modeling, Wiley 2008) and over 80 articles in software development magazines and conferences. Juha-Pekka holds a Ph.D. in computer science.
Juha-Pekka Tolvanen
Juha-Pekka Tolvanen
Talk: Mi 3.1
flag EVENT MERKEN
09:00 - 10:45
Mi 4.1
pmr::STL Containers for Embedded Applications
pmr::STL Containers for Embedded Applications

In der Voreinstellung reservieren die Container der Standardbibliothek ihren Speicher mit new und geben ihn mit delete wieder frei. Diese Aufrufe

• haben kein deterministisches Zeitverhalten und können insbesondere zu erst recht zeitaufwendigen Speicheranforderungen des Betriebssystems führen

• können zu einer Fragmentierung von Speicher führen.

In vielen Embedded Anwendungen ist das nicht tolerierbar.

Mit den seit C++17 im Namensbereich std::pmr (polymorphic memory resources) verfügbaren Allokatoren können diese Nachteile oft vermieden werden.

Zielpublikum: Architects, Developers, Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers,
Voraussetzungen: Basic C++ experience
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Fortgeschritten

Extended Abstract:
In der Voreinstellung reservieren die Container der Standardbibliothek ihren Speicher mit new und geben ihn mit delete wieder frei. Diese Aufrufe

• haben kein deterministisches Zeitverhalten und können insbesondere zu erst recht zeitaufwendigen Speicheranforderungen des Betriebssystems führen

• können zu einer Fragmentierung von Speicher führen.

In vielen Embedded Anwendungen ist das nicht tolerierbar. In der AUTOSAR Rule A18-5-5 wird verlangt:

Rule A18-5-5 (required, toolchain, partially automated)

Memory management functions shall ensure the following:

(a) deterministic behavior resulting with the existence of worst-case execution time,

(b) avoiding memory fragmentation,

(c) avoid running out of memory,

(d) avoiding mismatched allocations or deallocations,

(e) no dependence on non-deterministic calls to kernel.

Mit den seit C++17 im Namensbereich std::pmr (polymorphic memory resources) verfügbaren Allokatoren können diese Nachteile oft vermieden werden.

Prof. Richard Kaiser führt seit vielen Jahren Seminare für Firmen durch, vor allem über Software-Entwicklung und die Programmiersprachen C# und C++ sowie C. Zu seinen Kunden gehören renommierte Weltkonzerne und kleine und mittelständische Unternehmen.

Nach dem Studium der Mathematik an der Universität Tübingen und der FU Berlin war er an der Pädagogischen Hochschule Reutlingen in der Lehrerausbildung tätig und hat sich intensiv mit Mathematikdidaktik beschäftigt. Danach war er Software-Entwickler (v.a. für technische Anwendungen), bei einigen Firmen Leiter der Software-Abteilung, über 20 Jahre Professor an der Dualen Hochschule Lörrach, über 30 Jahre freiberuflicher Trainer für C, C++, C#, Speaker bei Konferenzen, Mitglied im DIN Normierungsausschuss Informationstechnik NI-22, usw.
C++20 Templates: The Next Level
C++20 Templates: The Next Level

C++20 is more or less out the door. It is probably the biggest change to the language since ever. In this session we will look into some changes that templates received with C++20. The biggest change is the introduction of Concepts.

We don’t stop there. We will also talk about improvements to CTAD and NTTP. Of course, we will also look into how templated lambdas work in C++20.

By the end of the talk you have learned about the newest C++20 template updates and how to apply them.

Target Audience: Developers
Prerequisites: Knowledge about at least C++11
Level: Basic

Andreas Fertig is an independent trainer and consultant for C++ specializing in embedded systems. Since his computer science studies in Karlsruhe, he has dealt with embedded systems and the associated requirements and peculiarities. He worked for about 10 years for Philips Medizin Systeme GmbH as a C++ software developer and architect with focus on embedded systems.
Andreas is involved in the C++ standardization committee, especially in SG14 which deals with embedded systems.
He also develops macOS applications and is the creator of cppinsights.io.
Richard Kaiser
Andreas Fertig
Richard Kaiser
Talk: Mi 4.1-1
Andreas Fertig
Talk: Mi 4.1-2
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 5.1
Software 2.0 - Building Production-Grade AI Enabled Products
Software 2.0 - Building Production-Grade AI Enabled Products

AI is maybe the most powerful tool our generation has available. Andrew NG called it "the new electricity". But what does it take to build AI enabled products? What are the key elements to achieve production grade AI? How does it impact your development process? How can quality be achieved? These are the questions this talk tries to answer. You will get an idea why the industry is talking about nothing less than a paradigm shift when it comes to developing AI based products.

Target Audience: Everyone interested in the shift from classical software engineering to data driven AI applications
Prerequisites: Interested in AI, how it works and its impact on engineering departments
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
AI is maybe the most powerful tool our generation has available. Andrew NG called it "the new electricity". Most likely you used an AI based product within the last 3 hours, maybe without even noticing it. But what does it take to build AI enabled products? What are the key elements to achieve production grade AI? How does it impact your development process? How can quality be achieved? These are the questions this talk tries to answer. In addition we will look into the different stages of AI development and the tools which can help to make this process more efficient. You will get an idea why the industry is talking about nothing less than a paradigm shift when it comes to developing AI based products.

Daniel Rödler is a Product Manager at understand.ai with the mission to automate annotations for autonomous vehicles and responsible for the overall product strategy. Before joining understand.ai Daniel worked for LogMeIn, a company focusing on online collaboration. There he was responsible for a part of GoToMeeting, LogMeIns biggest product with more than 2 Million users per month including an AI based voice identification mechanism to achieve much more useful meeting transcripts.
DevOps: State of the Union
DevOps: State of the Union

Whether evolution or revolution, or yet old wine in new skins, for more than 10 years, DevOps is changing how we develop and deliver software. This session looks back on the roots of DevOps, its movement until today, and current as well as possible future directions. This interactive session aims to offer a set of fruitful starting points for reflection and discussions.

Target Audience: Anyone interested in developing and delivering software
Prerequisites: Knowledge in DevOps and agile software development
Level: Advanced

Michael Hüttermann is a freelancing DevOps consultant. Besides that, he is a researcher studying DevOps. 
Daniel Rödler
Michael Hüttermann
Daniel Rödler
Michael Hüttermann
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09:00 - 10:45
Mi 8.1
The C4 Testpyramid - An Architecture-Driven Test Strategy
The C4 Testpyramid - An Architecture-Driven Test Strategy

The Test Pyramid is an efficient and effective approach for Software Testing but does not come with any details about concrete test methods or fixtures.

In my talk I will show you how to combine the principles of the Test Pyramid and the C4 Model for Software Architecture to elaborate a specific test strategy for your software product in a simple manner.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, QA Engineers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in Software Architecture and QA Engineering
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Software tests have to specify the behaviour of your product as extensive and reliable as possible. At the same time their implementation and maintenance costs should be kept at a minimum.

As Kent Beck said before: "I get paid for code that works, not for tests".

The Test Pyramid is a proven approach for this problem but leaves a lot of room for interpretation when elaborating a test strategy for your product.

Furthermore there are a lot of partly contradictory definitions of Unit, Service and Integration Tests and variations like “Test Diamond” and “Test Trophy” make it even more confusing. So, how do we get from the Test Pyramid to a concrete test strategy?

In my talk I will show you how to combine the principles of the Test Pyramid and the C4 Model for Software Architecture to obtain a test concept tailored for your product. Examples taken from a recent project will demonstrate how this approach balances test coverage, maintainability and development costs.

Christian Fischer works as a Software Engineering Coach at DB Systel and loves TDD, Extreme Programming and Craft Beer.
Testing a Data Science Model
Testing a Data Science Model

What would your first thought be when you are told there is no testing or quality structure in a team? How would you inspire a team to follow vital processes to thoroughly test a data science model?

I would like to share my knowledge about testing a model in a data science team.

Data science is a very interesting area to explore. It presents testing challenges that are quite different from “traditional” software applications. I will share my journey introducing testing activities to help build quality into a data science model.

Target Audience: Testers, QA, Developers, delivery managers, product owners, scrum masters, everyone is welcome
Prerequisites: QA, Testing
Level: Basic

Laveena Ramchandani is a vibrant, motivated and committed individual, whose main aim towards the IT industry is to apply herself and dedicate her energy to becoming the best hire as a Technical and/or Business Consultant. Establish through this experience a bridge of trust between the company and her education.

She has been awarded a Business Computing degree from Queen Mary University Of London. She thoroughly enjoyed the technical aspects of the computing side of her degree applied those skills to the business side of her degree.

She will bring an innovative and valuable contribution to any programme through her aptitude for IT, her interest in the business world and interpersonal skills. She is and will be a practical and valuable member of any team, as she is able to work effectively and efficiently with others to complete any given task.

She has excellent communication skills gained from both academic and non-academic environments.

Christian Fischer
Laveena Ramchandani
Christian Fischer
Talk: Mi 8.1-1
Laveena Ramchandani
Talk: Mi 8.1-2
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10:30 - 11:00
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

11:00 - 11:45
Mi 1.2
Rethink Processes and User Experience to Leverage The Full Potential Of Your Hipster Architecture
Rethink Processes and User Experience to Leverage The Full Potential Of Your Hipster Architecture

Modern architectures (e.g. event-driven and reactive) will gain more traction as we build more complex systems, connect more distributed components and slice systems into smaller autonomous pieces. Unfortunately, many companies don’t update their business processes to reflect this. I’ll give an example and discuss the consequences, motivating you to advocate for a redesign of your business processes internally. Too much attention gravitates towards the technical side of reactive, without thinking about the user journey or business implications.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Business Analysts
Prerequisites: Experiences with software architecture
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
There is a lot of buzz around reactive architectures. Take, for example, event-driven architectures, event-streaming or reactive programming. These architectures will gain more and more traction as we build more complex systems, connect more distributed components and slice systems into smaller autonomous pieces. Unfortunately, I see many companies that don’t update their business processes to reflect this new world. In this talk, I’ll give an example and discuss the consequences, hopefully motivating you to advocate for a redesign of your business processes internally–because too much attention gravitates towards the technical side of reactive, without thinking about the user journey or business implications.

Bernd Ruecker has been in the software development field for more than 15 years, automating highly scalable workflows at global companies including T-Mobile, Lufthansa and Zalando and contributing to various open source workflow engines. He is Co-Founder and Chief Technologist of Camunda – an open source software company reinventing workflow automation. Along with his Co-Founder, he wrote "Real-Life BPMN," a popular book about workflow modeling and automation. He regularly speaks at international conferences and writes for various magazines, focusing on new workflow automation paradigms that fit into modern architectures around distributed systems, microservices, domain-driven design, event-driven architecture and reactive systems.
Bernd Rücker
Bernd Rücker
Talk: Mi 1.2
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 5.2
Software Development Culture and Practice of the Future
Software Development Culture and Practice of the Future

My hope for the future of software development; We learn that we are responsible for so many big and small impacts to society and that we have to take that seriously. We learn that even if software processes are described in great detail, we should not stop questioning whether we are still doing the right thing, the right way. We can bring our whole self to work. But most of all we learn that continuous integration is something you must have, continuous delivery is very nice to have, and continuous deployment is but a lovely dream for most.

Target Audience: Software developers, agile coaches, managers, leaders, and anyone married to a software developer
Prerequisites: Experiences in agile software development
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
I have been in software development for 22 years, and I have seen trends come and go like the fascinations of a teenager. I have taught RUP and years later, I have laughed at RUP. On the other hand, I have laughed at Artificial Intelligence, but some years later, AI laughed at me.

This talk will describe how I think the future of software development will look if we reflect now and learn from the past. Learn to bring your whole self to work, and accept that others do the same. Learn that even if software processes can be described in great detail you should not stop questioning whether you are still doing the right thing in the right way. Learn that we are responsible for so many big and small impacts to society and that we have to take that seriously. But most of all learn that continuous integration is something you must have, continuous delivery is very nice to have, and continuous deployment is a lovely dream for most people.

In summary, I will borrow words from Dr Emmett Brown: “Roads? Where We’re Going, We Don’t Need Roads.” Developers will fly over the roadmaps and stage-gate systems and do exactly, no more, no less, what is needed to build wonderful software systems and to stay sane and human in our field.

Aino Corry is a teacher, a technical conference editor and retrospectives facilitator. She holds a masters degree and a ph.d. in computer science. She has 12 years of experience with Patterns in Software Development, and 13 years of experience in facilitating retrospectives. She also teaches how to teach Computer Science to teachers, and thus lives up to the name of her company; Metadeveloper. In her spare time, she runs and sings (but not at the same time).
Aino Vonge Corry
Aino Vonge Corry
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 6.2
How to Train Your Programmer
How to Train Your Programmer

Are the skills we apply as software developers of general value? Is our activity the collaborative exploration of creative spaces or the solitary application of mathematical techniques? This talk explores what programming can be, and what that means for teaching. Specifically, the prevalent approaches to teaching don't work, with disastrous effects for both inclusion and software quality. What does work is quite surprising. This talk gives a perspective on teaching from over 30 years of experience in schools, university, and industry.

Target Audience: Anyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
In the past, we've been practicing software development mainly as tinkering, and teaching it as such through examples, and this has mostly been a failure. If the software of the future and its impact on society is to be better than the depressing present, fundamental changes are necessary. The common approach to teaching, example-based teaching, expects knowledge about what we do to propagate via mental osmosis. It doesn't work, and, worse, communicates the wrong things. As software people, we have great potential to demonstrate the value of thorough listening, deep analysis, self-criticism, attention to detail, and systematic abstraction. Moreover, we can show how astounding creativity grows from these tenets. This talk will report on experience from 30 years of teaching software development to people of all ilks, and show you how to apply them to your co-workers, students, children, and maybe even yourself.

Michael Sperber is CEO of Active Group in Tübingen, Germany. Mike specializes in functional programming, and has been an internationally recognized expert in the field: He has spoken at the top conferences in programming languages, authored many papers on the subject as well as several books. Moreover, he is an expert on teaching programming.
Michael Sperber
Michael Sperber
Talk: Mi 6.2
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11:00 - 11:45
Mi 7.2
Evolving Monoliths to Microservices
Evolving Monoliths to Microservices

This talk will examine principles that assist with successfully evolving from a monolith to Microservices. Deciding what to decouple along with when and how to incrementally evolve a system are the main architectural challenges in this process. It is important to commit to "stop adding to the monolith" - all new code is added as microservices; the "Strangler Pattern". The new features are microservices, occasionally replacing part of the monolith. Also, when writing new microservices code, it is important to avoid dependencies to the monolith.

Target Audience: English, Developers, Architects, QAs, Testers
Prerequisites: Basic Understanding of architecture and microservices and familiarity with domain modeling
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Being Agile, with its attention to extensive testing, frequent integration, and focusing on important product features, has proven invaluable to many software teams. When building complex systems, focus on features provides a lot of value and starting with a monolith architecture can be advantageous. However, over time, although you might be committed to keeping the code clean, and having lots of tests — the architecture can become harder to evolve. Ultimately technical debt and design problems will creep in until it becomes muddy, making it hard to deliver new features quickly and reliably. Also, evolving the system quickly can become harder. If things are changing quickly with lots of teams, evolving using the microservices architectural style can have many possible benefits.

Many Microservices architectures start from the evolution of a Monolith system by gradually applying the microservices architectural style. There are considerations and principles that assist with successfully evolving from a monolith to Microservices. Deciding what to decouple along with when and how to incrementally evolve a system are the main architectural challenges in this process. There are good principles that help with this evolutionary process. For example, it is important to commit to "stop adding to the monolith" - all new code is added as microservices. This is the core of the "Strangler Pattern". The new features are microservices, occasionally replacing part of the monolith. Also, there might be important pieces of the monolith that are getting hard to maintain and you want to pull these out. When this happens, you find design seams within the monolith, refactoring these out to components, that can ultimately be replaced with microservices. Early on, it is ok to create macro services first and then evolve (refactor) them to microservices. Also, when writing new microservices code, it is important to avoid dependencies to the monolith. Finally, you can use DDD modeling to identify aggregates and bounded contexts to pull them out from the monolith. This talk will examine various patterns when evolving from the monolith to microservices specifically with variations of the Strangler Pattern.

Joseph (Joe) Yoder is president of the Hillside Group and principle of The Refactory. He is best known as an author of the Big Ball of Mud pattern, illuminating fallacies in software architecture. Joe teaches and mentors developers on agile and lean practices, architecture, flexible systems, clean design, patterns, refactoring, and testing. Joe has presented many tutorials and talks, arranged workshops, given keynotes, and help organized leading international agile and technical conferences.
Joe Yoder
Joe Yoder
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12:45 - 14:30
Lunch Break
Lunch Break
Lunch Break

14:30 - 15:30
Mi 4.3
Structure and Interpretation of Test Cases in C++
Structure and Interpretation of Test Cases in C++

Throw a line of code into many codebases and it’s sure to hit one or more testing frameworks. There’s no shortage of frameworks for testing, each with their particular spin and set of conventions and, but that glut is not always matched by a clear vision of how to structure and use tests — a framework is a vehicle, but you still need to know how to drive.

Compared to many languages, C++ has had slower widespread adoption of unit testing. This talk takes a deep dive into the practices and issues, looking at examples and counterexamples in C++.

Target Audience: C++ developers
Prerequisites: C++ programming
Level: Advanced

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He is co-author of “A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing” and “On Patterns and Pattern Languages”, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series, and editor of “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” and “97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know”.
Kevlin Henney
Kevlin Henney
Talk: Mi 4.3
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14:30 - 15:30
Mi 5.3
The Benefits of Nostalgia - Theoretical and Applied Perspectives
The Benefits of Nostalgia - Theoretical and Applied Perspectives

Looking back, especially now, makes us sad, but Linda will share scientific evidence that remembering the past provides measurable benefits. She'll outline the science and help us remember some of the "good old days" and then we'll all feel better.

Target Audience: Anyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Many of us experience nostalgia as a bittersweet emotion. It combines the memory of good times with the ache of loss. You might think that people who are more nostalgic are more prone to sadness and depression. But research shows that nostalgic reflection makes us more optimistic. It reaffirms our social connections. And by remembering important things about the past, it lays out a vision for a hopeful future. To demonstrate this, Linda will take us back to the "good old days" and through her remembrances, lead us all to a better place. This will, hopefully, demonstrate how nostalgia gives us renewed appreciation for the people and places that constitute our lives.

Linda Rising is an independent consultant who lives near Nashville, Tennessee. Linda has a Ph.D. from Arizona State University in object-based design metrics. Her background includes university teaching as well as work in telecommunications, avionics, and tactical weapons systems. She is an internationally known presenter on topics related to agile development, patterns, retrospectives, the change process, and the connection between the latest neuroscience and software development. Linda is the author of numerous articles and five books. Her web site is: lindarising.org
Linda Rising
Linda Rising
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14:30 - 15:30
Mi 8.3
Validation of Autonomous Systems
Validation of Autonomous Systems

Autonomous and automated systems are increasingly being used in IT such as finance, but also transport, medical surgery and industry automation. Yet, the distrust in their reliability is growing. This presentation introduces the validation of autonomous systems. We evaluate in practical situations such as automatic driving and autonomous robots different validation methods. The conclusion: Classic methods are relevant for coverage in defined situations but must be supplemented with cognitive test methods and scenario-based testing.

Target Audience: Testers, Quality assurance, Architects, Requirements Engineers, Product Owners, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: Testing basic know-how
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Autonomous and automated systems are increasingly being used in IT such as finance, but also transport, medical surgery and industry automation. Yet, the distrust in their reliability is growing. There are many open questions about the validation of autonomous systems: How to define reliability? How to trace back decision making and judge afterwards about it? How to supervise? Or, how to define liability in the event of failure? The underlying algorithms are difficult to understand and thus intransparent. Traditional validations are complex, expensive and therefore expensive. In addition, no repeatable effective coverage for regression strategies for upgrades and updates is available, thus limiting OTA and continuous deployment.

With artificial intelligence and machine learning, we need to satisfy algorithmic transparency. For instance, what are the rule in an obviously not anymore algorithmically tangible neural network to determine who gets a credit or how an autonomous vehicle might react with several hazards at the same time? Classic traceability and regression testing will certainly not work. Rather, future verification and validation methods and tools will include more intelligence based on big data exploits, business intelligence, and their own learning, to learn and improve about software quality in a dynamic way.

Verification and validation depend on many factors. Every organization implements its own methodology and development environment, based on a combination of several of the tools presented in this presentation. It is however relevant to not only deploy tools, but also build the necessary verification and validation competences. Too often we see solid tool chains, but no tangible test strategy. To mitigate these pure human risks, software must increasingly be capable to automatically detect its own defects and failure points.

Various new intelligent validation methods and tools are evolving which can assist in a smart validation of autonomous systems.

This presentation introduces the validation of autonomous systems. We evaluate in practical situations such as automatic driving and autonomous robots different validation methods. The conclusion: Classic methods are relevant for coverage in defined situations but must be supplemented with cognitive test methods and scenario-based testing.

Christof Ebert is managing director at Vector Consulting Services. He supports clients around the world in product development. Before he had been working for twelve years in global senior management positions. A trusted advisor for companies around the world and a member of several of industry boards, he is a professor at the University of Stuttgart and at Sorbonne in Paris. He authored several books including the most recent “Global Software and IT” published by Wiley and "Requirements Engineering" published by dPunkt and in China by Motor Press. Since many years he is serving on the editorial Board of the prestigious "IEEE Software" journal.
Michael Weyrich is the director of the University of Stuttgart’s Institute for Automation and Software Systems. Before he spent many years at Daimler and Siemens where he had senior management positions in engineering. Ever since he engages in technology transfer and is heading numerous industry projects on automation and validation. He authored several books including the leading reference book on "Industrial Automation" published by Springer. Since many years he serves on VDI in various leadership positions. He is leading the VDI/VDE committee on testing of connected systems and industry 4.0.
Christof Ebert, Michael Weyrich
Christof Ebert, Michael Weyrich
Talk: Mi 8.3
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14:30 - 15:30
Mi 9.3
Stories of Incremental Improvements on the Way to Continuous Everything
Stories of Incremental Improvements on the Way to Continuous Everything

After years of introducing “CI”/CD-Pipelines, after using Jenkins, CircleCI, Docker and K8s, your teams still don’t deliver software within minutes? And your customers still know about bugs before you do? Well, maybe you’re doing it wrong.

We’ll share our experiences on how to incrementally get organisations and systems to be able to leverage all the things associated with “continuous everything”. We argue for solutions tailored to individual situations, and more connected to software craftsmanship than to buzzwords and boxed solutions.

Target Audience: Everyone with the challenge to get functionality to customers - quick
Prerequisites: Some knowledge about general software development
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
After years of introducing “CI”/CD-Pipelines, after using Jenkins, CircleCI, Docker and K8s, your teams still don’t deliver software within minutes? And your customers still know about bugs before you do?

Maybe designing the perfect world during your first sprint just doesn’t cut it. The beautiful docker scaling idea just doesn’t work, because the “microservice” can only run in one instance at a time. The testautomation framework the Ops team provided can unfortunately not test your windows application. Your elasticsearch needs more and more space, but none of the developers have removed a single exception notification. The awesome buildpipeline with the included tests has a great dashboard that shows a red build continuously, but no one cares and you still do hotfixes on the production system. And your last major “refactoring” branch has been running green for the last two month, but you just can’t merge it back into your production code without breaking a few minds.

Well, maybe you’re doing it wrong.

Companies that successfully employ continuous delivery usually don’t excel in their tools. They excel in the architecture of their software, they excel in the way the people in the company work together, they excel in the way everyone actually understands what they are doing. In such environments people are not afraid of magic things that might happen in some unknown system, but leverage tools to automate things they themselves know how to do - so good that it gets boring and thus these tasks are better done by tools.

We’ll share our experiences on how to incrementally get organisations and systems to be able to leverage all the things associated with “continuous everything”. We argue for solutions tailored to individual situations, and more connected to software craftsmanship than to buzzwords and boxed solutions.

After quite a while in software development in the last century Michael Mahlberg turned to consulting on software architecture and processes in general around the turn of the Millennium. Always with a strong focus on continuous improvement and sustainable change he now spends most of his time supporting clients in their quest for more effective ways to work, mostly by applying lean and agile concepts.
Falk Kühnel ist begeisterter Agilist auf der Suche nach dem Glück, großartigen Arbeitsumgebungen und mitarbeiterorientierten Unternehmen, die gute Gewinne erwirtschaften.

Falk beschäftigt sich seit dem Studium der Informatik mit XP und agilen Methoden.

Außerdem ist er ausgebildeter Mediengestalter, Diplom-Informatiker (Dipl.-Inf.), Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Trainer für Certified Scrum Developer, CSM, CSPO, CSD und CSP, Team Kanban Practitioner und praktizierender Zyniker.

Michael Mahlberg, Falk Kühnel
Michael Mahlberg, Falk Kühnel
Talk: Mi 9.3
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15:45 - 16:30
KeyMi2
Software Architecture: The Past, The Present, and the Future
Software Architecture: The Past, The Present, and the Future

Over the history of software systems, the way we build such artifacts, the way we design them, the way we express them have evolved in seemingly disruptive ways. Even today, the pendulum swings between low ceremony agile methods to more rigid waterfall-ish ones; from big balls of mud to microservices and then back to big balls of microservices. In this talk, we'll examine the past, the present, and the future of software architecture: the role it plays in software systems, and the timeless fundamentals that remain across the fullness of time.

Grady Booch is Chief Scientist for Software Engineering at IBM Research where he leads IBM’s research and development for embodied cognition. Having originated the term and the practice of object-oriented design, he is best known for his work in advancing the fields of software engineering and software architecture. A co-author of the Unified Modeling Language (UML), a founding member of the Agile Alliance, and a founding member of the Hillside Group, Grady has published six books and several hundred technical articles, including an ongoing column for IEEE Software. Grady was also a trustee for the Computer History Museum. He is an IBM Fellow, an ACM and IEEE Fellow, has been awarded the Lovelace Medal and has given the Turing Lecture for the BCS, and was recently named an IEEE Computer Pioneer. He is currently developing a major trans-media documentary for public broadcast on the intersection of computing and the human experience.
Grady Booch
Grady Booch
Track: Keynote
Talk: KeyMi2
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16:30 - 17:00
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

17:00 - 18:00
Mi 2.4
Real Cross-functional Teams for Creating real and better Products
Real Cross-functional Teams for Creating real and better Products

At the core of agile development are self-organizing cross-functional teams. Yet, this is often understood as e.g. backend & front-end developers working together. If an organization is aiming for company-wide agility, to fully benefit from agility it has to enable teams as value centers that are truly cross-functional by bringing in different perspectives from business, markets, cultures, beliefs etc. This way cross-functional teams overcome not only the limitations of organizational silos but also of a singular view on the market.

Target Audience: Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers, in general everyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Too many products have been developed that serve one kind of client only. The reason is that the composition of the teams leads (subconsciously) to the development of products that serve only people that resemble the people in the team. One “famous” example is the soap dispenser that only works if your hands are white.

If teams are really cross-functional and are resembling the diversity of the market, the products they’re creating are also better. Thus, if the whole team has the full business expertise, knows the market, reflects the full diversity of the clients, then it can even disrupt the market and isn’t waiting for some person (e.g. the Product Owner) to decide on priorities. With this real cross-functionality the team can fully understand the company’s business and has a holistic view of it, knowing its contribution to the company’s value stream.

Real cross-functional teams are an essential building block for implementing company-wide agility and the organization benefits by creating better and in a way more real products and by having more options when entering the war of talent.

Jutta Eckstein works as a business coach, change manager, consultant & trainer. She focuses on enabling agility on the organizational level.
Maryse Meinen is a scrum master and agile coach, helping people uncover better ways.
Spreading the love for true empiricism and for dancing the BOSSA nova is her focus for 2021

Jutta Eckstein, Maryse I. Meinen
Jutta Eckstein, Maryse I. Meinen
Talk: Mi 2.4
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09:00 - 10:30
Do 4.1
Game Facilitation Primer
Game Facilitation Primer

Tired of running workshops without gamification? Want to move from pure content to engagement? Want to use agile games and don't know how? And maybe most important: How to do that remote/online?

Gamification is the hot topic. Everyone talks about it. Unfortunately nobody knows what games to pick and how to facilitate them. Getting started in this field of highly valuable agile games for workshop facilitation is not easy.

We give you everything you need to design engaging online and offline workshops.

Target Audience: Scrum Master, Agile Coaches, HR, Change Agents, Managers
Prerequisites: None. We'll introduce the topic
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
The participants will get a clear image where to go next in gamifying their workshops, trainings, conference sessions. For that we give the participants everything they need to design engaging online and offline events.

The session involves the participants through several interactive activities.

We answer the question how and when to include games. And how to reach learning objectives by guiding the participants through our own Agile Game Mapping.

We show how to prepare for such workshops. With the Agile Game Toolboxes for both online and offline events, participants will take away immediately usable ideas for their working environment. We bring lots of real-world examples “to go”, i.e. physical games to play in offline events, as well as many game designs to be used remotely. Our session will close with answering as many questions as possible.

Since Dennis Wagner started his software development profession at the age of 17 he experienced many times that Agile is the way to go. He works as end-to-end coach and supports both teams and management.
Marc Bless has 20+ years experience as Agile Coach, software developer, and leader. As Solution-Focused Coach and Certified Enterprise Coach he supports organizations on their way to more Business Agility.

Dennis Wagner, Marc Bless
Dennis Wagner, Marc Bless
Talk: Do 4.1
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09:00 - 10:30
Do 5.1
Software Architecture for AI-intensive Systems
Software Architecture for AI-intensive Systems

The problem at hand is partly the application of software engineering best practices to AI, but more so the evolution of software engineering to attend to software-intensive systems that contain AI components. In this lecture, I'll examine both dimensions: emerging AI architectures, neuro-symbolic systems, designing/testing/deploying/refactoring/maintaining systems with AI components; the future of software engineering.

Target Audience:
Software engineers
Prerequisites: Curiosity and a desire to think different
Level: Advanced

Grady Booch is Chief Scientist for Software Engineering at IBM Research where he leads IBM’s research and development for embodied cognition. Having originated the term and the practice of object-oriented design, he is best known for his work in advancing the fields of software engineering and software architecture. A co-author of the Unified Modeling Language (UML), a founding member of the Agile Alliance, and a founding member of the Hillside Group, Grady has published six books and several hundred technical articles, including an ongoing column for IEEE Software. Grady was also a trustee for the Computer History Museum. He is an IBM Fellow, an ACM and IEEE Fellow, has been awarded the Lovelace Medal and has given the Turing Lecture for the BCS, and was recently named an IEEE Computer Pioneer. He is currently developing a major trans-media documentary for public broadcast on the intersection of computing and the human experience.
Grady Booch
Grady Booch
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09:00 - 10:30
Do 6.1
How Cognitive Biases and Ranking can Foster an Ineffective Architecture and Design
How Cognitive Biases and Ranking can Foster an Ineffective Architecture and Design

The power of collaborative modelling comes from having a diverse group of people who, together, have a lot of wisdom. The problem here is we don’t actually listen to all the available input and perspectives due to cognitive biases and ranking. If we aren't aware of that it kills those insights and wisdom and kills the effectiveness of your models! In this talk where we will explore how we can improve our facilitation skills and focus on neuro-inclusiveness with using Deep Democracy in our design process.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Decision Makers, CTO, Tech Leads, designers, facilitators
Prerequisites: Facilitating or doing collaborate modelling
Level: Expert

Extended Abstract:
The power of collaborative modelling comes from having a diverse group of people who, together, have a lot of wisdom and knowledge. You would expect that all this knowledge will be put to use, co-creating, and to design a model. In reality, we don’t actually listen to all the available input and perspectives due to cognitive biases and ranking. Because not everything that needs to be said has been said, we will end up with sub-optimal models and architecture. Even worse, people don’t feel part of the solution and don’t commit to it. Good architecture and design need all the insights and perception. If we are not aware, cognitive biases and ranking kills those insights and wisdom and kills the effectiveness of your models!

Join us in this talk where we will interactively explore how we can improve our facilitation skills and focus on neuro-inclusiveness with Lewis Deep Democracy (LDD). By having a Deep Democratic discussions together on what biases are at play during liberating structures workshops, and how ranking will effect a visual collaborative modelling session like EventStorming and User Story Mapping, you will gain first-hand experience about LDD. With this experience, we will explain how we embedded LDD in our design processes. We will let you leave with the knowledge on how to observe sabotage behaviour, battle oppression, and to create safety in exploring alternative perceptions. We will show you how you can really let the group say what needs to be said and take a collective autocratic decision in designing your software models.

Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
Evelyn van Kelle is a strategic software delivery consultant, with experience in coaching, advising and guiding organisations and teams in designing socio-technical systems.
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle
Kenny Baas-Schwegler, Evelyn van Kelle
Talk: Do 6.1
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10:30 - 11:00
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

11:00 - 11:45
Do 4.2
Becoming an Agile People Manager
Becoming an Agile People Manager

Is agile management an oxymoron? And if it's not, what does it really involve? I've been exploring what it means to be a good people manager, and especially, to be a good manager in an agile context, where the focus is not on command and control, but on encouraging people to be autonomous and sharing information. In this talk, I will share stories and my own personal "rules of engagement" - principles to guide me and concrete actions or responses to common situations.

Target Audience:
Managers, leaders,
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
The world doesn't like testers. As a tester, I spent time and effort trying to improve the world for testers to live in. Then I also became a manager. Now I have to start over to improve the next space! And my plan of attack is to set an example by being the best manager I can be.

Never one to ignore a challenge, I've been exploring what it means to be a good people manager, and especially, to be a good manager in an agile context, where the focus is not on command and control, but on encouraging people to be autonomous and sharing information. In this talk, I want to share stories and my own personal "rules of engagement" - principles to guide me and concrete actions or responses to common situations.


I'll go into:
• The power and danger of empathy
• The rule of yes or tomorrow
• Rituals for trust
• Being authentic and vulnerable
• Leading by example

I'll share things that have worked, things that haven't, and how I reflect on my growth and learnings to keep progressing.

Alex Schladebeck ist eine Testerin aus Leidenschaft. Ihr Herz schlägt für Qualität, Agilität und ihre Mitmenschen. Sie ist Geschäftsführerin und Leiterin der Qualitätssicherung bei der Bredex GmbH.

In diesen Rollen unterstützt sie Kollegen, Kunden und Teams auf ihrer Reise, bessere Qualität zu liefern: in Produkten, in Prozessen und in der Kommunikation.

In früheren Rollen war sie für die Befähigung von Teams und qualitativ hochwertige Systeme verantwortlich. Nun befähigt sie andere, genau das zu machen, und sorgt für eine Umgebung in der Firma, wo jede(r) aufblühen kann.

Alex schaut mit neugierigen Tester-Augen auf die Welt und möchte immer dazu lernen. Sie teilt ihr Wissen und ihre Erfahrungen in Workshops, Coachings und als Sprecherin oder Keynote-Sprecherin auf Konferenzen.
Alex Schladebeck
Alex Schladebeck
Talk: Do 4.2
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 5.2
Distributed Ledger Technologies for Industrial Applications
Distributed Ledger Technologies for Industrial Applications

Industrial products, factories, trains and energy systems are starting to connect with business transactions, financial services and analytics. However, in the context of IoT, M2M, Industry 4.0, and global supply chains, there is a growing need to have such integration of operational and business systems across company and trust boundaries. This presentation explains how distributed ledger technologies like blockchain play a key role as underlying trust technology in enabling such cross-company integration.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leads, Managers
Prerequisites: Basic understanding in Blockchain or other Distributed Ledger Technologies
Level: Advanced

Dr. Andreas Kind is Head of Cybersecurity Technology and Blockchain at Siemens, Corporate Development. He received his Ph.D. degree in computer science from the University of Bath, UK and worked in various positions at IBM Research from 2000 until 2018. During this time, his team was key contributor to the Hyperledger Blockchain Project. Andreas' research interests include industrial cybersecurity, distributed ledger technologies, and Internet of Things. Andreas is a Senior Member of the ACM.
Carolin Rubner leads the research group Decentralized Architectures & Blockchain and the research module "Development Efficiency and Industrial-Grade DevOps" within Siemens Technology in Erlangen, Germany. She has been working with Siemens across nearly all verticals for 23 years. Her career started as a software architect and project manager specializing in international research and development projects. Prior to her current role, she spent 5 years as Siemens Technical Liaison Manager at Microsoft (Redmond, WA) and worked as a responsible Research Group Lead on the topic of Software Architecture & Platforms in Princeton, NJ.
Andreas Kind, Carolin Rubner
Andreas Kind, Carolin Rubner
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 8.2
Consistency in a Complex World: From Brand Identity to a Consistent User Experience
Consistency in a Complex World: From Brand Identity to a Consistent User Experience

Designing complex applications to support domain-specific workflows presents unique challenges which even become bigger when multiple complex applications are provided by the same organization.

Especially, when software uses different technologies and target devices, it becomes a really tough job to achieve a consistent user experience across all product lines. Solely visual consistency is often not supported by all technologies and gives limitations. In our approach, we use the Brand identity to derive principles for a consistent experience.

Target Audience:
Manager, Decision Maker, Product Manager, Business Management, Brand Management, UX
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of user experience purpose, UX activities & brand managemen
Level: Advanced

Sebastian Graeber, head of Elektrobit Automotives central UX-department, is a zealous human-centered design specialist who shares an incredible passion for fostering a culture of user-centered innovation.
Constantin Götz, designs strategist at Elektrobit Automotive, is an advocate of brand driven user experience and brand-centered mindset.
Sebastian Graeber, Constantin Götz
Sebastian Graeber, Constantin Götz
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 9.2
The Road to Site Reliability Engineering
The Road to Site Reliability Engineering

Introducing SRE is a challenging endeavor. Not only does it involve technological choices and practices but also processes, organization and culture. This talk will walk through the evolution of operations/SRE at Instana. Starting in the early days with just a handful of well-meaning family-and-friends customers over platform re-architectures and team growth to the present day with customers all around the world and 365/24/7 operations. It will touch the key challenges we had to face in each of these phases and how we approached them.

Target Audience
: Developers, Operators, DevOps, Project Leads, Managers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic



Bastian Spanneberg is part of the SRE team at Instana, having experienced its evolution since the early days of the company.
Bastian Spanneberg
Bastian Spanneberg
Talk: Do 9.2
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12:45 - 14:30
Lunch Break
Lunch Break
Lunch Break

14:30 - 15:30
Do 5.3
Event Déjà Vu—Solving Really Hard Problems With Data
Event Déjà Vu—Solving Really Hard Problems With Data

Spaghetti business is difficult enough to swallow without serving a plate of spaghetti architecture and another of spaghetti code. Consider some really hard problems with data and learn how to tackle them with a minimum of technical complexity. Vaughn demonstrates complex business scenarios with solutions using Reactive, DDD, events, and streaming, in a microservices-based distributed system, but with the edges whittled smooth. Join Vaughn as complexity is blown away like wood shavings in a fall wind.

Target Audience:
Software Architects, Senior SW Developers, Business Stakeholders with Deeply Complex Problem Spaces
Prerequisites: Sound knowledge in
Level: Advanced


Extended Abstract:
Distributed Computing: check
Microservices: check
FaaS: check
Reactive: check
Event Sourcing: check
CQRS: check
Streaming data: check
Fast data: check
Solution Delivered: not so much

Our industry is strangely fascinated with the new and mysterious, often more so it seems than with delivering business value. Users don’t care about distributed computing, microservices, FaaS, Reactive, CQRS, streaming, or even features. What users care about are outcomes, and checking the technology boxes doesn't deliver outcomes to users. Even simpleton CRUD applications have become overly complicated white elephants bestowed on unsuspecting businesses.

So what happens when the business problem space is complex? Spaghetti business is difficult enough without adding an overdose of architecture and code complexity. It's time for change. Consider some really hard problems with data that we present in government, medical, and financial domains, and learn how to tackle them with a minimum of technical complexity. Events become events become events... Vaughn demonstrates complex business scenarios with solutions using Reactive, DDD, events, event sourcing, CQRS, and streaming, in a microservices-based distributed system, but with the edges whittled smooth. Join Vaughn as complexity is blown away like wood shavings in a fall wind.

Vaughn Vernon is an entrepreneur, software developer, and architect with more than 35 years of experience in a broad range of business domains. Vaughn is a leading expert in Domain-Driven Design and Reactive, and champions simplicity. He consults and teaches around Domain-Driven Design and Reactive software development, helping teams and organizations realize the potential of business-driven and reactive systems as they transform from technology-driven legacy web implementation approaches. Vaughn is the author of three best-selling books published by Pearson/Addison-Wesley, and has been commissioned by them as the curator and editor of his own Vaughn Vernon Signature Series.
Vaughn Vernon
Vaughn Vernon
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14:30 - 15:30
Do 6.3
Problem? What Problem? Practice Collaborative Problem-solving?
Problem? What Problem? Practice Collaborative Problem-solving?

Working in teams we face problems in our daily work. As a team, we should be able to solve problems collaboratively. Agile calls these problems impediments.

Impediments can be something in the way of working, processes, tools, or organizational rules or structures. They can also be something cultural or structural.

In this mini-workshop we'll practice solving an impediment as a team. Next, we'll explore how we solved it, how we worked together. What hindered and helped us. We'll learn what we can do to collaborate better.

Maximum number of participants: 60

Target Audience: Scrum masters, tech leads, agile coaches, consultants, developers, testers, managers, CxOs
Prerequisites: Some experience of working in teams
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
This is a hands-on mini-workshop about collaborative problem-solving. It will be an interactive session where people work together to solve a problem in a kind of role-play. Next, we'll explore the behaviors that arose, focusing on what helps and hinders collaboration.

I'll kick it off by presenting problem-solving techniques and tips for collaborative problem-solving and dealing with impediments.

During the session, we'll split up into groups using breakout rooms. In each group, a part of the attendees will do a role play where they work on a problem, where others will be observing how this goes. If time permits, we'll rotate solving two impediments.

Next, the observers will share what they saw happening where the group discusses this.

Ben Linders is an Independent Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality, and Continuous Improvement. As an adviser, trainer, and coach, he helps organizations with effectively deploying software development and management practices. He focuses on continuous improvement, collaboration and communication, and professional development, to deliver business value to customers.

Ben is an active member of networks on Agile, Lean, and Quality, and a well-known speaker and author.


Ben Linders
Ben Linders
Talk: Do 6.3
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14:30 - 15:30
Do 9.3
Deployment Patterns for Confidence: Quality Delivery Pipeline
Deployment Patterns for Confidence: Quality Delivery Pipeline

DevOps as a software engineering practice unifies software development (Dev) and software operation (Ops). To assist with quality delivery in with DevOps you need to provide a “Quality Delivery Pipeline” to assure the delivery meets the requirements and proper validation and checks are done before releasing into full production. This talk will focus on the “Quality Delivery Pipeline” as a practice that can help sustain delivering with confidence by addressing important qualities in the pipeline.

Target Audience:
English, Developers, Architects, QAs, Testers, Product Owners
Prerequisites: Basic Understanding of architecture and microservices and familiarity with DevOps
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Many software development processes such as Agile and Lean focus on the delivery of working software that meets the needs of the end-users. Many of these development processes help teams respond to unpredictability through incremental, iterative work cadences, and through empirical feedback. There is a commitment to quickly deliver reliable working software that has the highest value to those using or benefiting from the software. DevOps has become a common practice to assist with quality delivery in these practices, specifically when developing using the microservices architectural style. DevOps as a software engineering practice unifies software development (Dev) and software operation (Ops). To assist with quality delivery in these practices you need to provide a “Quality Delivery Pipeline” to help assure the delivery meets the requirements and proper validation and checks are done before releasing into full production. At the end of the pipeline the validated system will be deployed into production. There are various deployment techniques to help successfully and reliably deploy more quickly. The goal is to give confidence by providing "reliable, working software" to the user (making the user confident in the system). Also, the teams will have more confidence the system is working. This talk will focus on the “Quality Delivery Pipeline” as a practice that can help sustain delivering with confidence by addressing important qualities in the pipeline.

Joseph (Joe) Yoder is president of the Hillside Group and principle of The Refactory. He is best known as an author of the Big Ball of Mud pattern, illuminating fallacies in software architecture. Joe teaches and mentors developers on agile and lean practices, architecture, flexible systems, clean design, patterns, refactoring, and testing. Joe has presented many tutorials and talks, arranged workshops, given keynotes, and help organized leading international agile and technical conferences.
Ademar Aguiar is a Professor at Faculty of Engineering of University of Porto (FEUP) and researcher at INESC Porto, with over more than 20 years of experience on software development, software architecture and design (patterns, frameworks, infrastructures), agile methods, wikis, and open collaboration tools.
Joe Yoder, Ademar Aguiar
Joe Yoder, Ademar Aguiar
Talk: Do 9.3
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15:45 - 16:30
KeyDo2
A Sustainable Internet. Missing Pieces to a Healthy Future
A Sustainable Internet. Missing Pieces to a Healthy Future

Sustainability is often defined as the interconnection of: social connection, economic wellbeing, and a healthy environment. The recent corona pandemic has yet again highlighted the potential as well as the necessity of a fundamental technology: the internet. However, to be sustainable, the internet also needs to assess, mitigate, and live up to its responsibilities for a healthy environment – an element of the equation that is too often neglected. What is the internet’s environmental impact and what would it take for it to be sustainable?

Extended Abstract:
Sustainability is often defined as the interconnection of three elements: social connection, economic wellbeing, and a healthy environment. The recent corona pandemic has yet again highlighted the potential as well as the necessity of a fundamental technology: the internet. The internet has become the lifeline for social connection in times of physical distancing. It is also the primary means by which to still conduct business for those of us that are not on the essential frontlines, in terms of working remotely, providing online services, and monetization, hence being a critical vehicle to safeguard some economic wellbeing. However, to be sustainable, the internet also needs to assess, mitigate, and live up to its responsibilities for a healthy environment – an element of the equation that is too often neglected. What is the internet’s environmental impact and what would it take for it to be sustainable?

Cathleen Berger is a political scientist by training. She has built her career on combining her expertise and training with her curiosity for technological developments, notably with a view to cultural differences in a globalised, networked world. As of March 2020, Cathleen became Mozilla’s first Sustainability Steward, leading the organisation’s journey towards environmental sustainability. Prior to that, Cathleen headed up Mozilla’s work on Global Governance, developed policy strategy for the Office of the Chair, and identified emerging trends around technologies and their impact on society.
Cathleen Berger
Cathleen Berger
Track: Keynote
Talk: KeyDo2
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16:30 - 17:00
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

17:00 - 18:00
Do 2.4
From Capabilities to Services: Modelling for Business-IT Alignment
From Capabilities to Services: Modelling for Business-IT Alignment

Service-orientation seems to be in vogue again, this time dressed up as microservices. Many seem to get going with very little plan and thought, running the risk of sliding down the slippery slope towards distributed monoliths. Some experts try to encourage domain-driven design, but that may confuse even more. We crave more guidance. Maybe the classic business capability maps could help?

Target Audience:
Architects, developers
Prerequisites: Some experience with modularisation and enterprises
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Service-orientation is still a surprisingly hard and complex endeavour after all these years and the risk of getting it wrong, potentially ending up with a distributed monolith with its devastating coupling, fragility, and cognitive nightmare, is still very real to many. Our industry is fairly immature and moves so fast that internalising acquired knowledge seems difficult and we often go through cycles of re-discovery of findings made decades ago. Maybe some SOA practitioners from the previous attempts made some breakthroughs that we have missed as we now have another go with microservices?

The concept of business capabilities from business architecture can be one approach to take a closer look at, with its holistic outside-in perspective of the company. The capability vantage point inherently abstracts away the 'what' a company does from the 'how', describing the essence of what the business offers. In this talk we will take a closer look at what they are and what they can help us with, all the way from business strategies and analysis, via organisational design to data management and technical design. They may just be the tool we need to design services, micro or not, holistically in a business aligned sociotechnical system, where people, information, processes, and technology defined by the business capability they support.

Trond Hjorteland is an IT architect and aspiring sociotechnical systems designer from the consulting firm Scienta.no and has many years experience with large, complex, and business critical systems, primarily as a developer and architect on middleware and backend applications. His main interests are service-orientation, domain-driven design, event-driven architectures, and sociotechnical systems, working in industries like telecom, media, TV, and public sector. Mantra: Great products emerge from collaborative design.
Trond Hjorteland
Trond Hjorteland
Talk: Do 2.4
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17:00 - 18:00
Do 3.4
Transformation Burnout. Will Your Groundhog day be any different this time?
Transformation Burnout. Will Your Groundhog day be any different this time?

Picture burnout as a system where you have multiple variables and details to combine:

Expectations, rules, routines, emotions and workload.

Now add Agile Transformation where all of the above are present. And see a receipt for personal disaster.

Agile Transformations play a big role in my experience, for I have seen many of them both as a professional coach and a team member in a transforming organization. Being burned out, on the edge and enduring burnout.

The session is a case with steps I have uncovered in serving teams and myself.

Target Audience: Managers, Decision Makers, Leaders, Coaches
Prerequisites: Team working experience, leadership experience
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Picture burnout as a system.
Now add Agile Transformation.
And see a receipt for personal disaster.

Change of structure, roles, policies, and, most importantly – expectations. This is where humans suffer the most, and where coaches can help the most if we are sufficiently equipped.

There is an individual burnout that occurs due to the pressure that you exert on yourself – this is very common among those who are perfectionists (CEOs or CIOs in our context).

There is also interpersonal attrition, which is caused by complicated work relationships (can you imagine working alone on your routine tasks and now being in a team with that particular person you dreaded for decades?)

And finally, there is organizational exhaustion, which is caused by poor organization and unrealistic demands made on you by others (the tremendous top-down start of transformation).

Transformation missions where coaches are hired to observe, lead, encourage others to mastery, and set up daily routines and ceremonies. Is there more?

First of all, hence you are in a coaching position, your main task is not to have a strong opinion from day one, rather download, expand your perception filter, connect emotionally and act from an open heart.

The session aims at providing the toolkit to those in transformation and those in burnout. We will use Theory U practices, personal resilience coaching, and emotional intelligence assessments. To see how these combine with leadership and agile coaching on a daily basis and very hands-on activities.

My name is Anna and I am an Agile Coach. For the past decade I was exploring wins, losses, tools, and techniques to thrive in project management which led me, surprisingly to Agile. I am working with aspiring and seasoned leaders, new teams, and one in transformation and gained experience in multiple domains, 50+ projects, 5 countries and 3 formats of work. I developed 6 online programs and regularly conduct webinars and workshops, produce videos and podcast and host meetups. Let's talk!
Anna Lavrova
Anna Lavrova
Talk: Do 3.4
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17:00 - 18:00
Do 5.4
The Future Is Already Here?
The Future Is Already Here?

When we look at where we are now with software development and applications, we can see the roots of today's world in the past. Ideas in current practice are not new, they are just more popular — machine learning, (micro)services, DevOps, Agility, etc. And some things have always been promised as revolutionary but have never taken centre stage, such as the story of CASE tools, MDA, AOP and generative programming. We trace back through time to examine these trends so that we can go forward. What are we seeing now that will be our future?

Target Audience:
Anyone interested in developing and delivering software
Prerequisites: Experiences in software architecture and development
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:

Science fiction author William Gibson said that "The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed." When we look at where we are now with software development and applications, we can see the roots of today's world in the past. Ideas in current practice are not new, they are just more popular — machine learning, (micro)services, DevOps, functional programming, Agile development, etc. And some things have always been promised as revolutionary but have never taken centre stage, such as the story of CASE tools, MDA, AOP and generative programming. We trace back through time to examine these trends so that we can go forward. What are we seeing now that will be our future?

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He is co-author of “A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing” and “On Patterns and Pattern Languages”, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series, and editor of “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” and “97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know”.
Frank Buschmann ist Senior Principal Engineer bei Siemens Corporate Technology in München. Dort erforscht er moderne Software-Architektur und Entwicklungsansätze für die industrielle Digitalisierung. Die Produktentwicklung unterstützt Frank bei der effizienten Anwendung dieser Technologien. Seine aktuellen Forschungsschwerpunkte sind Architekturen für Cyber-Physikalische Systeme, das Internet of Things, Intelligente Systeme sowie industrielles DevOps. Frank ist Co-Autor von vier Bänden der von John Wiley & Sons veröffentlichten 'Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture'.
Kevlin Henney, Frank Buschmann
Kevlin Henney, Frank Buschmann
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18:30 - 20:00
Ndo 2
Flow - A New Way To Estimate Work And Coach Teams
Flow - A New Way To Estimate Work And Coach Teams

Haven’t we been there – working extremely focused on an interesting solution that we forgot to eat, sleep and finally finish after many hours had passed. That mental state – when we reach the height of our abilities - is called Flow.

In the 1st part of this session, you will learn about Flow and experience ways to help others raise their chance to reach Flow.

In the 2nd part you will learn a new way to estimate work based on “Flow-Theory”. This #newestimate can jump-start conversations, improve performance and help you coach your team.

Target Audience: Scrum Masters, Agile Coaches, Team Leads, Managers, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge on regular ways to estimate work, some experience with coaching might be helpful
Level: Advanced

Markus Wissekal ist das, was man als agiles Taschenmesser beschreiben könnte: Kanban-Trainer, Scrum Professional, LSP Facilitator, systemischer Coach, Medizininformatiker sowie Unternehmensberater.
Markus Wissekal
Markus Wissekal
Talk: Ndo 2
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09:00 - 16:00
Fr 2
Cloud Platform Journey: Docker & Kubernetes in Practice
Cloud Platform Journey: Docker & Kubernetes in Practice

You already heard a lot about Docker and Kubernetes, but never got really in touch with it ? Are you looking to build your very own Docker container and deploy it to Kubernetes with some rules of thumb?

This workshop provides participants with in-depth knowledge and hands-on experience with Docker & Kubernetes. We will start with explaining the main concepts before moving onto more advanced topics and with some insights & lessons learned from projects.

The workshop will include a combination of slides and hands-on exercises.

Maximum number of participants: 25

Target Audience: Engineers, architects, developers, juniors, students
Prerequisites: A notebook with internet connection, please see description
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Containerize a distributed application, Deploy it to a Kubernetes Cluster, Connect the components to each other, Deploy for end-user including automatic scaling without downtime. Optional: Recovery, Logging, Testing

Technical Requirements:

Participants will be able to work in a provided cloud environment. They will need their own laptop/workstation with a stable Internet connection and a tool for secure terminal connections (putty, ssh or similar).

Thorsten Jakoby is a consultant for IT-Architectures and Cloud Migrations at Novatec in Germany. He is currently technical lead for an enterprise-scale cloud migration at a global automotive client.

With a background of 10 years in distributed applications Thorsten enables both customers building cloud architectures and students entering the IT and cloud world. Prior to his role at Novatec he led a company specialized in cloud-based startup projects.

Matthias Haeussler ist Principal Cloud Advocate bei der NovaTec Consulting GmbH und der Veranstalter des Stuttgart Cloud Foundry Meetups. Er berät Kunden bei deren Cloud Strategie und unterstützt aktiv Implementierungen und Migrationen. Daneben unterrichtet er Cloud Native Development an den Hochschulen für Technik in Stuttgart und Esslingen. Davor war er über 15 Jahre bei der IBM R&D beschäftigt. Er hält regelmäßig Vorträge auf nationalen sowie internationalen Konferenzen und Meetups wie z.B. WJAX, OOP, den IT Tagen sowie der KubeCon, IBM InterConnect & Cloud Foundry Summit.
Thorsten Jakoby, Matthias Häussler
Thorsten Jakoby, Matthias Häussler
Talk: Fr 2
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09:00 - 16:00
Fr 3
Designing Bounded Contexts for Microservices Using Visual Collaboration
Designing Bounded Contexts for Microservices Using Visual Collaboration

There is an industry trend where businesses are moving towards autonomous product teams. These teams aim to be end-to-end responsible for the product they are building and maintaining. To achieve end-to-end team autonomy, companies move towards a microservices architecture to successfully inspect and adapt. However, to be successful organisations need to have the correct boundaries for the microservices. Using the bounded context pattern from Domain-Driven Design it is possible to achieve team autonomy!

Maximum number of participants: 24

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Testers, Analysts, Product Owner, Manager, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: None. It is an interactive workshop, with brown paper, post-its and whiteboards
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
There is an industry trend where businesses are moving towards autonomous product teams. These teams aim to be end-to-end responsible for the product they are building and maintaining. With the help of Continuous Delivery, teams have faster feedback cycles in which they can probe if a certain feature works. To achieve end-to-end team autonomy, companies move towards a microservices architecture to successfully inspect and adapt. To be effective with a microservices architecture, we require Conway's alignment, engineering teams aligned to business models/products; to achieve Conway’s alignment it’s required to design and model the domain. Domain-Driven Design’s bounded context is the essential pattern that helps to create Conway’s alignment.

Join us in this hands-on session where we show you how visual collaboration is the most effective way in co-creating sustainable Conway’s alignment. We will distil bounded contexts with visual collaboration tools Big Picture EventStorming, Context Mapping and the Bounded Context Canvas.

With visual collaboration:


- We create a shared understanding of the business flow, uncovering inconsistencies and competing goals

- Using the Theory of Constraints, we can discover, highlight and create a shared vision and strategy to focus our effort

- A critical part of doing visual collaboration is effective facilitation, especially facilitating workshops with +30 people at the same time

You leave our session understanding that to be effective with microservices, you need to start discover and design bounded contexts. You will learn heuristics that guide you in using visual tools in specific situations, and how to move on towards microservices.

João Rosa believes that empowered teams working in a network-based system are the future of organisations. He uses Domain-Driven Design, Visual Collaboration Tools and Teal organisation principles to help companies to move to new operating models.
Leveraging Deep Democracy, Domain-Driven Design, Continuous Delivery and visual collaborate tools, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers organisations, teams and people in building valuable software products.
João Rosa, Kenny Baas-Schwegler
João Rosa, Kenny Baas-Schwegler
Talk: Fr 3
flag EVENT MERKEN
09:00 - 16:00
Fr 5
Refactoring to Immutability
Refactoring to Immutability

It has been said that immutability changes everything. But what does that mean in practice? What does it mean for existing code that looks more like the mutant apocalypse than an elegant application of mathematical thinking?

Full immutability is not always possible. Refactoring, on the other hand, is all about the art of the possible. In this hands-on workshop (bring a laptop!), we'll be looking at some tricks and tips to help reduce mutability in code.

Maximum number of participants: 16

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: Java or C# knowledge
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
It has been said that immutability changes everything. But what does that mean in practice? What does it mean for existing code that looks more like the mutant apocalypse than an elegant application of mathematical thinking? Mainstream programming languages are normally grounded in imperative styles — from updating local variables to updating records in databases. But although they have grown from imperative roots, languages such as C# and Java are expressive and evolved enough that they can embrace many different approaches. Indeed, trends in the development of many languages have made immutability and the reduction of mutability easier to support.

Immutability is attractive because it makes code easier to reason about, reduces the possibility of many classes of bug, improves the testability of code, reduces the amount of validation and error-handling code, makes code more scalable when threaded and makes code more thread-safe. However, immutability can be an ideal that is hard to reach, and much advice doesn’t cover enough of the situations developers find in their codebases. Refactoring, on the other hand, is all about the art of the possible.

Whether you’re working in the cloud or on the desktop, in the mobile space or on the web, steering your code and design style towards immutability offers both short-term and long-term practical benefits. In this hands-on workshop, we’ll be looking at guidance and practice to help reduce the mutability of state in your codebase.

So bring a laptop, but don't worry about IDEs, editors, compilers and all that — just a browser and WiFi access! We'll be running the hands-on part using cyber-dojo.org, working with unit tests and good humour :-)

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His development interests are in patterns, programming, practice and process. He is co-author of “A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing” and “On Patterns and Pattern Languages”, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series, and editor of “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” and “97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know”.
Kevlin Henney
Kevlin Henney
Talk: Fr 5
flag EVENT MERKEN
09:00 - 16:00
Fr 6
Enabling Whole Team Quality as a Tester in an Agile Team
Enabling Whole Team Quality as a Tester in an Agile Team

Agile testers need to lead the team, other testers, product owners and customers towards better quality. Yet agile teams don’t generally bestow formal authority. And, as testers, we’re often trying to lead from a position that is still not always appreciated.

The workshop will focus on hands-on exercises and activities for achieving enablement for whole team quality. No programming skills are necessary, but we will be doing some work involving code in groups and in a safe learning environment.

Target Audience: Testers, developers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
The role of a tester on an agile team is so much more than “hey can you test this with your super testing skills”. Testers are, on the one hand, chameleons who need to adapt their skills to new situations within the team. On the other hand, we can’t just react to situations – we need to lead the team, other testers, product owners and customers towards better quality. Yet agile teams don’t generally bestow formal authority. And, as testers, we’re often trying to lead from a position that is still not always appreciated (“agile teams don’t need testers”, “testers are just bad developers”, “you’re just a tester”…).

In complex situations where we’re dealing with unknown unknowns plus sticky, messy humans, communication is key. A degree in psychology would sometimes be helpful. Multiple years of cat-herding too. In this workshop, Alex will focus on communication.

The workshop will consist of the following topics:

- Communicating the value and role of testing

- Testers as the communication glue for various stakeholders and within the team: talking about  testing, risk and quality at the right level for the right audience

- Enablement: Teaching, coaching, coercing and encouraging others within the team to take on quality- related tasks and to support the value of the product through testing

- What testers and other team members can do together, resulting in better and more efficient results

The workshop will focus on hands-on exercises and activities. No programming skills are necessary, but we will be doing some work involving code in groups and in a safe learning environment.

Alex Schladebeck ist eine Testerin aus Leidenschaft. Ihr Herz schlägt für Qualität, Agilität und ihre Mitmenschen. Sie ist Geschäftsführerin und Leiterin der Qualitätssicherung bei der Bredex GmbH.

In diesen Rollen unterstützt sie Kollegen, Kunden und Teams auf ihrer Reise, bessere Qualität zu liefern: in Produkten, in Prozessen und in der Kommunikation.

In früheren Rollen war sie für die Befähigung von Teams und qualitativ hochwertige Systeme verantwortlich. Nun befähigt sie andere, genau das zu machen, und sorgt für eine Umgebung in der Firma, wo jede(r) aufblühen kann.

Alex schaut mit neugierigen Tester-Augen auf die Welt und möchte immer dazu lernen. Sie teilt ihr Wissen und ihre Erfahrungen in Workshops, Coachings und als Sprecherin oder Keynote-Sprecherin auf Konferenzen.
Alex Schladebeck
Alex Schladebeck
Talk: Fr 6
flag EVENT MERKEN
10:30 - 11:00
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

12:00 - 13:00
Lunch Break
Lunch Break
Lunch Break

14:30 - 15:00
Coffee Break
Coffee Break
Coffee Break

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