Conference Program

Please note:
On this page you will only see the English-language presentations of the conference. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2024 correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "VORTRAG MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

Track: Trends & Techniques

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  • Dienstag
    30.01.
  • Mittwoch
    31.01.
  • Donnerstag
    01.02.
, (Dienstag, 30.Januar 2024)
09:00 - 10:30
Di 3.1
All tests are green? Oh no!! Why it is sometimes good, if a test fails
All tests are green? Oh no!! Why it is sometimes good, if a test fails

Test coverage: 100% - Check!
And why do we still have bugs?
OK, tests don't prove the absence of errors.
And at the end of the day, they are just code which could contain bugs as well.
And perhaps they give us a false sense of security.
But how do I know, that my test are good?
One way to find out is using Mutation Testing.
In this talk I want to explain, what Mutation Testing is, how to do it and when it is helpful.

Target Audience: Developers, Achitects, Testers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in Programming, some experience in writing tests
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
More and more teams are writing tests for their production code, be it by applying concepts like TDD or BDD or by just writing them "after the fact". Sometimes there is also a test coverage metric that needs to be met. The positive effect is definitely that there are tests. Be it for my future self or a future colleague or as a form of documentation.
Tests are a means of telling something about the quality of production code. Mutation testing can help tell something about the quality of tests. It helps to find missing tests and potential bugs.
The concept of mutation testing is already more than 50 years old, but its application has not yet become widespread.
This talk should encourage you to take a closer look at mutation testing to find out what possibilities it offers in your own project, but also to see what disadvantages or pitfalls there are.

Birgit Kratz is freelancing software developer and consultant with more than 20 years experience in the Java ecosystem.
Her domain as well as her passion is using agile development methods and spreading the software-crafting ideas.
This is why she is a co-organizer of the German software crafting community (Softwerkskammer) events in Cologne and Düsseldorf for many years now.
And she helps organizing the SoCraTes conference (Software Crafting and Testing Conference).
To balance her job activities she rides her road bike quite extensively.

Shifting accessibility testing to the left
Shifting accessibility testing to the left

How often have you heard that ‘Yes this is important, but we don’t have the capacity right now’ or ‘sure let’s put it in the backlog’?
This is something we should not brush off or take lightly. Accessibility testing is vital especially when your product is a user facing application.
We need to be socially aware as a team and build quality towards our product with making it more accessible.

Target Audience: Everyone as Accessibility is for social awareness
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
At least 1 in 5 people in the UK have a long term illness, impairment or disability. Many more have a temporary disability. A recent study found that 4 in 10 local council homepages failed basic tests for accessibility.
This is quite vital and the sooner we as testers can advocate this into our teams, we make our product more accessible, reduce the risk of bad product reviews, reputation and also be more socially aware. Let's shift left and make accessibility testing built-in our teams.

  1. Understand why accessibility testing is important?
  2. How I adapted accessibility mindset?
  3. How to coach team and bring accessibility into your teams?
  4. Demonstrate various tools available to perform accessibility testing (with demo)

The Tech world is ever growing, and Laveena Ramchandani has been working in Tech for 10 years now. She works in testing and quality assurance, a good mix of technical and business awareness role. Laveena has learned a lot through her career and looks forward to gaining more knowledge and at the same time inspires and spreads more Testing eminence around the world.
Laveena Ramchandani is an experienced Software Testing Manager with a comprehensive understanding of tools available for software testing and analysis. She aims to provide valuable insights that have high technical aptitude and hopes to inspire others in the world through her work, blogs, podcasts and regularly speaks at events on data science models and other topics.

Birgit Kratz
Raum 04b
Laveena Ramchandani
Raum 04b
Birgit Kratz
Raum 04b

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Laveena Ramchandani
Raum 04b
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14:00 - 14:45
Di 3.2
So you could have Women in Technology: How Companies can close the gender gap?
So you could have Women in Technology: How Companies can close the gender gap?

Reducing the gender gap in technology companies is a critical goal for fostering diversity, promoting equality, and unlocking the industry's full potential. Despite significant progress in recent years, women remain underrepresented in technical roles and leadership positions. Diverse teams bring different perspectives, creativity, and innovation, leading to better problem-solving and successful businesses. By working together, we can create a future where women are equally represented and empowered in all aspects of the technology sector.

Target Audience: Leaders, C-Levels, Technical Leaders, Managers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The technology industry, a rapidly growing and influential sector, has made significant strides in innovation and progress. However, the underrepresentation of women in technical and leadership roles still needs to be addressed. This gender gap has far-reaching consequences, including limiting diversity in problem-solving and innovation, fostering a hostile work environment for women, and missing out on the untapped potential of the entire tech workforce.
A multifaceted approach is necessary to address this issue and build a more inclusive tech industry. For this, some actions can be performed, for example: Mentorship Programs: Establishing mentorship programs specifically for women in tech can be immensely beneficial. Having experienced mentors who understand the challenges and opportunities in the industry can help women navigate their careers, build confidence, and foster a sense of belonging. Addressing Unconscious Bias: Conducting unconscious bias training for all employees can lead to a more inclusive workplace. Tech companies can create a culture of equality and fairness by raising awareness of implicit biases and providing tools to challenge them. Retention and Support: Implementing retention programs focused on supporting women in tech careers is essential. Companies should prioritize creating an environment where women feel valued and respected and have equal opportunities for growth and advancement.
By collaborating and investing in these strategies, we can work towards a future where women are equally represented and empowered in all aspects of the technology sector. Embracing diversity and gender equality is the right thing to do and a crucial step toward driving innovation and progress in the technology sector. During this lecture, we discuss the global panorama, show some actions that have shown promising results, discuss the benefits of reducing the gap, and define joint actions that can be promptly implemented in their companies and teams.

Graziela Simone Tonin has worked in the technology market for over 19 years in Brazil and abroad. Ph.D. in Computer Science. Received the US IBM World Award and the Women of Value Award.
Graziela mentors and worked in several national entrepreneurship and innovation programs, such as Innovativa Brasil. Ambassador of Clube Bora Fazer, an entrepreneurship community. She works as a professor at Insper Institution, a Teacher of Executive Education and customized programs for C-Levels, and also is a professor in Computer Science and Engineering program. She led the Women In Tech Project and is co-leader in the Gender Front of the Diversity Committee at Insper. Graziela leads volunteer projects throughout Brazil through the Grupo Mulheres do Brasil. In addition, she is part of a worldwide research project that analyzes initiatives aimed at women in software engineering.

Carolina Fouad Kamhawy is Project Manager of the Innovation Hub at Insper and leader of the Women in Tech Project.

Graziela Simone Tonin, Carolina Fouad Kamhawy
Raum 04b
Graziela Simone Tonin, Carolina Fouad Kamhawy
Raum 04b
Vortrag: Di 3.2
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17:45 - 18:45
Di 3.4
Software Engineer's 2034 Playbook
Software Engineer's 2034 Playbook

Expanding Horizons, the motto of OOP 2024, invites exciting thoughts about the future of software engineering. What will a developer's working day look like in 2034? What environments, tools, and practices will they use to create, test, deploy, and operate software? What will our daily lives look like in a digitalized world in 2034? What types of software systems will be everywhere? What systems will we use at work? What architectures and technologies do these systems rely on? Frank and Kevlin look into the future.

Target Audience: Anyone curious about the future of software engineering
Prerequisites: Interest and sound knowledge in software engineering, architecture and development
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
Expanding Horizons, the motto of OOP 2024, invites exciting thoughts about the future of software engineering. What will a developer's working day look like in 2034? What environments, tools, and practices will they use to create, test, deploy, and operate software? What will our daily lives look like in a digitalized world in 2034? What types of software systems will be everywhere? What systems will we use at work? What architectures and technologies do these systems rely on?
The view is not always clear, but we can look at past and present trends to ask questions and make some forecasts. How will AI affect the daily work of developers, but also everyone else's work? Digitalization is affecting everyone from government to individual — how far will it have taken us by 2034? The last couple of years have seen a lot of media around cryptocurrency, Web3 and the Metaverse, but to what extent will these hopes and hypes actually have affected software development and software usage? What new trends can we expect to see in software architecture, programming languages and workplace culture?
Join Frank and Kevlin as they look into the future, a decade from now.

Frank Buschmann is a Senior Principal Engineer at Siemens Technology in Munich. His interests are in modern Software-Architecture and development approaches for industrial digitization.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer and trainer. His development interests are in programming, practice and people. He is co-author of two volumes in the "Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture" series, and editor and contributor for multiple books in the "97 Things" series. He lives in Bristol and online.

Frank Buschmann, Kevlin Henney
Raum 13a
Frank Buschmann, Kevlin Henney
Raum 13a
Vortrag: Di 3.4
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, (Mittwoch, 31.Januar 2024)
11:00 - 11:45
Mi 3.2
Smoothen Your Journey into the Cloud – Fifteen Factors of Success
Smoothen Your Journey into the Cloud – Fifteen Factors of Success

Organizations are drawn to migrate their systems into the cloud, but in practice, cloud transformations do not always succeed in achieving the advantages often promised by cloud providers, such as scalability, availability, and cost effectiveness.
We give an overview over Kevin Hoffmann's fifteen factors for cloud-native applications and how they help us achieve success in our cloud migrations.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Operations, DevOps
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of web services
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
You think you are already reaping the cloud's harvest by lifting and shifting your apps to some cloud-provided VM or container infrastructure?
You've already read about Heroku's (original) twelve factors, maybe even skimmed though Kevin Hoffmann's book, and think your app is good enough, because you are using Git, have a CI pipeline, and someone in the team once ran the app in a Docker container?
Or you think your team isn't going to the cloud any time soon and this advice does not apply to you anyway?
Maybe you're right. Chances are, you are in for a surprise, though.
The original twelve factors for cloud-native application development are (reasonably) well established and widely agreed upon. Yet, in practice, there appear to be some misunderstandings regarding their meaning, and we see cloud migrations fail precisely due to reasons that could be avoided by following these factors correctly. The extension to fifteen factors by Kevin Hoffmann is less widely known, but no less important for modern, cloud-native application landscapes, especially since this extension also revisits and updates the original twelve factors.
The goal of this talk is to disseminate and discuss the fifteen factors, as well as to emphasize their interrelations and embed them in the greater context of modern application development, in order to help reduce pain for many teams tasked with bringing their software to the cloud.

Matthias Dangl worked as a researcher in the field of software engineering at the SoSy-Lab at LMU Munich, and, since then, has accumulated several years of practical experience as a software architect and consultant.

Matthias Dangl
Raum 04a
Matthias Dangl
Raum 04a
Vortrag: Mi 3.2
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14:30 - 15:30
Mi 3.3
GraalVM, CRaC, Leyden and friends – in search of TRULY cloud-native Java
GraalVM, CRaC, Leyden and friends – in search of TRULY cloud-native Java

Although the term "Cloud Native" in the context of Java has been repeated ad nauseam for years, the JVM as a platform has only recently entered a phase where everything truly aligns with how cloud-native architectures are designed. Let's trace the path Java has already taken in recent years and take a look at what lies ahead in the future. During this presentation, you will learn about projects such as Leyden, CRaC, and GraalVM, and how they can realistically influence the way applications are developed.

Target Audience: Cloud Java Architectural Leads
Prerequisites: Basic Knowledge od Java, Cloud Challenges Experience
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The goal of the presentation is to provide a comprehensive overview of the evolution of Java in relation to cloud-native architectures. The presentation aims to educate the audience about the progress Java has made in recent years and shed light on the future prospects of the language.
By discussing key projects like Leyden, CRaC, Microprofile and GraalVM, the presentation intends to demonstrate their relevance and potential impact on application development. Ultimately, the goal is to inspire the audience to embrace cloud-native principles in their Java projects and adapt their development practices accordingly.

Head of Java/Kotlin Engineering at VirtusLab, Artur Skowroński has been in the industry for ten years. During this time, he has had the opportunity to work in various roles, such as Software Engineer, Tech Lead, Architect, and even Technical Product Manager. This diverse experience enables him to approach problems from a holistic perspective.
He still loves to get his hands dirty - for more than two years, he has been publishing weekly reviews of events in the JVM world - https://vived.substack.com/

Artur Skowroński
Raum 11
Artur Skowroński
Raum 11
Vortrag: Mi 3.3
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17:00 - 18:00
Mi 3.4
Σπεύδε βραδέως (Hurry Slowly)
Σπεύδε βραδέως (Hurry Slowly)

"Σπεύδε βραδέως" in ancient Greek, or "festina lente" in Latin translates as "hurry slowly" an oxymoron saying to indicate the need for balancing deliberation and urgency.
In this talk we comment on the prevailing perceptions relating to speed of software development and how in a DevOps context what sometimes is perceived as fast from an individual's perspective has a deleterious effect on team performance while practices traditionally viewed by developers as cumbersome have in fact a positive effect on team performance and effectiveness.

Target Audience: Software Engineers and DevOps Practitioners
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The talk draws on the experience of multiple projects but uses the team setup and 2020/2021 data of the NHS Covid19 app's backend services teams as a showcase for a team that managed to avoid neglecting subjects like peer reviews, documentation, testing etc. in a high pressure, high pace environment.

Vassilis Rizopoulos is Principal Devops Consultant at Zühlke specializing in team efficiency and automation. He has over 25 years of software development experience dealing with a wide area of subjects from embedded and regulated environments to web and cloud infrastructure.
He was one of the lead engineers responsible for developing, deploying and operating the backend services for the NHS Covid19 contact tracing app in 2020/2021.

Vassilis Rizopoulos
Raum 04a
Vassilis Rizopoulos
Raum 04a
Vortrag: Mi 3.4
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, (Donnerstag, 01.Februar 2024)
09:00 - 10:30
Do 3.1
Performant Component through Customization
Performant Component through Customization

Most current UI libraries provide great user experience with a vast of components. But when it comes to heavy customization and non-standard scenarios, especially for E-Commerce, they become hard to manage, scale or even slow down performance. How to create a UI library that provides users the most possible freedom in customizing components, while keeping our performance and scalability to the fullest? How much customization freedom is enough? That's what my talk is about.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, Project Leader
Prerequisites: JavaScript
Level: Advanced

Maya Shavin is Senior Software-Engineer in Microsoft, working extensively with JavaScript and frontend frameworks and based in Israel. She founded and is currently the organizer of the VueJS Israel Meetup Community, helping to create a strong playground for Vue.js lovers and like-minded developers. Maya is also a published author, international speaker and an open-source library maintainer of frontend and web projects. As a core maintainer of StorefrontUI framework for e-commerce, she focuses on delivering performant components and best practices to the community while believing a strong Vanilla JavaScript knowledge is necessary for being a good web developer.

Latest Developments in Open Source
Latest Developments in Open Source

Last year in open source, we saw the compliance threat shift from license violation to contract violation, we saw the rise of the bill of material as a purchasing requirement, and we saw the continued growth of source-available licenses. If you don't know what I'm talking about, you really need to attend, because your business is at risk if you don't understand these changes. In this annual talk, I will review the last year and speculate about what the future may bring.

Target Audience: Product Leaders, Engineering Leaders, Architects, Developers, Enthusiasts
Prerequisites: Basic understanding of open-source software development
Level: Advanced

Dirk Riehle is a professor of computer science at University of Erlangen. He is also the CEO of Bayave GmbH, a consulting firm, and chief scientist of EDITIVE, one of the startups out of his research. His work helps companies succeed in and through software, with a specialization in open source, inner source, and product strategy. Before joining academia, Prof. Riehle led the open source research group at SAP Labs in Palo Alto, California.

Maya Shavin
Raum 04b
Dirk Riehle
Raum 04b
Maya Shavin
Raum 04b

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Dirk Riehle
Raum 04b
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11:00 - 11:45
Do 3.2
NEU: Planet Earth as Our Stakeholder – Finding Ways to a Green Future
NEU: Planet Earth as Our Stakeholder – Finding Ways to a Green Future

This talk is about my journey as a Scrum Master towards creating sustainable DevOps teams. I will share my learnings and inspire the audience to raise awareness on sustainability in their own teams and organizations.
We will have a look at IT (and our own work) through the generational lens, to discover how long-term thinking can reshape the way we look at our daily work and help us find strategies for making IT sustainable.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, IT Managers, Agile Professionals
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Climate change is a significant threat to the future of life on earth and as I was looking for ways to become more sustainable, the idea started to grow that at work, in my own DevOps teams, we could also take the sustainability perspective. I dove into the subject of sustainable IT and started with a ‘Planet as a Stakeholder Retrospective’ for my Scrum Team in which we went over the Principles of Green Software Engineering. We discussed what steps our team could take to reduce the carbon footprint of our services.
Taking the sustainability perspective was a new approach for the team, but everyone agreed on its importance. During that session, the team estimated that optimizing our landscape and decommissioning legacy components could reduce our footprint by a significant percentage!
Just imagine: what if all DevOps teams would do that? I started to give workshops about ‘the Planet as a Stakeholder’, in which I help teams to look at their IT services through the sustainability lens and let them define the first steps forward.
In this talk I will share my experiences: failures, challenges, successes, and examples of practical steps that teams have already taken to reduce their carbon footprint.

Marjolein Pilon is a creative and energetic Scrum Master from the Netherlands, currently serving 2 teams at Alliander (a Dutch power grid operator). She is also passionate about Planet Earth (our most important stakeholder!) and is raising climate awareness in the IT and Agile community by giving trainings, workshops and talks about reducing the carbon footprint of IT.

Marjolein Pilon
Raum 02
Marjolein Pilon
Raum 02
Vortrag: Do 3.2
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14:30 - 15:30
Do 3.3
NEU: Predicting the Future of Quality, Testing and Teams
NEU: Predicting the Future of Quality, Testing and Teams

The world is constantly changing. As IT professionals, we are aware of the intrinsic changeability of projects, contexts and our business, but the events of the last years have put this into sharper focus. How will external changes shape our teams and our work?
Alex looks at what factors are at work now, and what kinds of effects will they have on how we work, and the roles of testers and software professionals. She will also look at activities on an individual and company level, to best prepare ourselves for a nebulous future.

Target Audience: Everyone
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The world is constantly changing, and everything is impermanent. As IT professionals, we are aware of the intrinsic changeability of projects, contexts and our business, but the events of the last years have put this into sharper focus. How will external changes shape our teams and our work?
How can we shape ourselves proactively in order to be able to respond to changes, make changes or our own and even thrive? Alex looks at what factors are at work now, and what kinds of effects will they have on how we work, and the roles of testers and software professionals. She will also look at concrete activities on an individual and company level, to best prepare ourselves for a nebulous future.

Alex Schladebeck is a whirlwind of enthusiasm for quality, agility and humans. She started out in testing and had an interesting and varied career as a product owner, consultant and team leader before becoming a part of the management team at the beginning of 2020.
She spends her time communicating with people! A typical week involves working with customers, teaching and coaching testers and developers about quality, being an agile leader, working on strategy and developing her team to fulfil their potential. She keeps up to date on her favourite topics by supporting and consulting for teams and customers.
Alex is a frequent speaker and keynote speaker at conferences about agility and quality from her experiences in projects and with customers, and she was awarded the Most Influential Agile Testing Professional Person award in 2018. In her free time, she loves doing sports, playing music and being an auntie. She describes herself as an explorer and loves discovering places, cultures, perspectives and people.

Alex Schladebeck
Raum 12a
Alex Schladebeck
Raum 12a
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