Conference Program

Please note:
On this page you will only see the English-language presentations of the conference. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2024 correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "VORTRAG MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

Thema: Sustainability

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  • Montag
    29.01.
  • Dienstag
    30.01.
  • Mittwoch
    31.01.
  • Donnerstag
    01.02.
, (Montag, 29.Januar 2024)
14:00 - 17:00
Mo 13
Limitiert Sustainable Development: Managing Technical Debt
Sustainable Development: Managing Technical Debt

As systems become complex, teams can be burdened with technical debt and architectural challenges, slowing development, and ultimately not being as agile and nimble as desired. If not enough attention is paid to technical debt, design problems will creep in until it becomes muddy, making it hard to deliver features quickly and reliably. This workshop discusses ways to sustain development by understating and managing technical debt. We will present the technical debt metaphor including the impact, and how to identify and monitor technical debt.

Max. number of participants: 50

Target Audience: Architects, Technical Managers, Agile Coaches, Developers, POs, Scrum Masters, QA
Prerequisites: Understanding architecture is beneficial though not necessary
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
When building complex systems, it can be easy to focus primarily on features and overlook software qualities, specifically those related to the architecture and dealing with technical debt. Some believe that by following Agile practices—starting as fast as possible, keeping code clean, and having lots of tests—a good clean architecture will magically emerge. While an architecture will emerge, if there is not enough attention paid to the architecture and the code, technical debt, and design problems will creep in until it becomes muddy, making it hard to deliver new features quickly and reliably. Often, the technical debt items are unknown, unmonitored, and therefore not managed, thus resulting in high maintenance costs throughout the software life-cycle. This workshop discusses elements of sustainable development specifically for dealing with technical debt. The main topics that will be explained are the technical debt metaphor and concept, the impact of incurring technical debt, some types of technical debt, and what is not technical; debt. Additionally, we will discuss technical debt that teams may incur, where and how it arises, how to identify, monitor, and manage these debts to pay in the long term, and living with technical debt.

Graziela Simone Tonin has worked in the technology market for over 19 years in Brazil and abroad. Ph.D. in Computer Science. Received the US IBM World Award and the Women of Value Award.
Graziela mentors and worked in several national entrepreneurship and innovation programs, such as Innovativa Brasil. Ambassador of Clube Bora Fazer, an entrepreneurship community. She works as a professor at Insper Institution, a Teacher of Executive Education and customized programs for C-Levels, and also is a professor in Computer Science and Engineering program. She led the Women In Tech Project and is co-leader in the Gender Front of the Diversity Committee at Insper. Graziela leads volunteer projects throughout Brazil through the Grupo Mulheres do Brasil. In addition, she is part of a worldwide research project that analyzes initiatives aimed at women in software engineering.

Joseph (Joe) Yoder is a research collaborator at IME/USP, owner of The Refactory, and president of the Hillside Group which is dedicated to improving the quality of life of everyone who uses, builds, and encounters software systems. Joe is best known for the Big Ball of Mud pattern, which illuminates many fallacies in software architecture. Recently, the ACM recognized Joe as a Distinguished Member in the category of "Outstanding Engineering Contributions to Computing".

Graziela Simone Tonin, Joseph Yoder
Raum 03
Graziela Simone Tonin, Joseph Yoder
Raum 03
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, (Dienstag, 30.Januar 2024)
09:00 - 10:30
Di 6.1
How to reduce the footprint of Spring Boot applications
How to reduce the footprint of Spring Boot applications

In this session we will walk through various techniques to significantly reduce the resource consumption of regular Spring Boot applications, including using Spring AOT for regular Spring apps, compiling Spring Boot apps to native images (using GraalVM), and using CRaC for instant startup (for scale-to-zero scenarios). We will compare the different approaches, discuss pros and cons for each technology, and share concrete numbers from real-world applications to give the audience an idea of what can be achieved using these technologies.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects
Prerequisites: Basic Spring Boot knowledge required
Level: Advanced

Mehr Inhalte dieses Speakers? Schaut doch mal bei sigs.de vorbei: https://www.sigs.de/autor/martin.lippert

Martin Lippert is part of the Spring engineering team at VMware and leads the Spring tools engineering. In addition to that he focuses on sustainability and green software for several years now.

Mehr Inhalte dieses Speakers? Schaut doch mal bei sigs.de vorbei:  https://www.sigs.de/autor/martin.lippert

The tragedy of user-centred design
The tragedy of user-centred design

User-centred design is one of the default modes of teams working with software, but the consequences are often unsustainable in a densely networked world as we privilege users over all other stakeholders and systems. How might teams approach building products, services and organisations from a more sustainable standpoint than 'user-centricity'? This talk looks at how the techniques of game design, community development, platform operations and security practices can support a practice focused on hyperobjects for multi-centric design.

Target Audience: Leaders, Builders, Architects, Designers, Community Members
Prerequisites: No previous knowledge, only enthusiasm for systems, building things and design
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The key feature of a 'tragedy' is when everybody does the right thing but it goes wrong anyway. The aim of this session will be to look at why user-centred design goes wrong even if everyone's intentions are pure. This talk (gently!) brings in ideas from feminism, design thinkers, political science and anthropology to focus on very practical, grounded approaches to sustainable design in software teams. We'll look at how building things and designing organisations that have increased levels of friction can improve users' experience and how 'seamless' design can lead to disempowerment. And we'll also draw on the speaker's practical experience of building products used by millions of citizens as part of the UK's digital transformation. By the end of the session we'll have a sense of what might replace the shallow seamlessness of 'user-centred' design — a multi-centric, transcendental design aimed at manufacturing enthusiastic consent.

Simon Edward Bostock is a product and design leader who's worked with software for 20+ years. His interests include how firms and brands incorporate new technologies, how work flows through organisations, EverythingOps and service topologies.

Martin Lippert
Raum 11
Simon Edward Bostock
Raum 11
Martin Lippert
Raum 11

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Simon Edward Bostock
Raum 11
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16:15 - 17:15
Di 8.3
Is Efficiency the End of Story for Green Software?
Is Efficiency the End of Story for Green Software?

"Which programming language is the fastest" usually is everyone's first thought when green software is mentioned! It's a common deduction that the fastest code is, therefore, the most efficient, which then, of course, can save us from this climate disaster. However, code efficiency is not even half of the story! In this talk, Sarah will review the three approaches that make software green. She will also introduce efficiency-achieving practices that can take us closer to fighting this pesky climate change.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, SRE/DevOps
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of any Programming Language, Introductory Familiarity with DevOps Space
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
In this talk, I will go over the following:

  1. My journey so far with green software emphasizes how I don't need to leave my climate enthusiasm at home every day when I go to work
  2. Brief facts about WHY we need to take action now in the tech industry
  3. 3 approaches that make software green
  4. Why code efficiency is not the answer to most green software problems with an example
  5. Going over why DevOps practices are much more effective in achieving greenness in software with a couple of examples
  6. Wrapping up with fruit for thoughts, especially highlighting the close connection between DevOps practices and Green Software practices
  7. Encourage the audience to look at their software engineering problems through a green software lense

Sarah Hsu is a strong advocate for green sustainable software. She regularly speaks and writes on the subject. She is co-authoring an O'Reilly book on the same topic titled "Building Green Software". She is the Green Software Course project chair for the Green Software Foundation. The group and the Linux Foundation recently launched a free online educational course, Green Software for Practitioners (LFC131), to help software practitioners build, run and maintain greener applications. She is currently a Site Reliability Engineer working on a distributed platform in Google Cloud at Goldman Sachs.

Sarah Hsu
Raum 03
Sarah Hsu
Raum 03
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, (Mittwoch, 31.Januar 2024)
18:30 - 20:00
Nmi 2
Expanding Horizons
Expanding Horizons

Expanding horizons has many facets. It means taking advantage of new opportunities that arise from technical progress, such as Large Language Models, or societal challenges like Sustainability. Expanding horizons also means taking responsibility. AI and data analytics have a direct impact on our future life, good and bad. Expanding horizons also means reflection on existing practice. We have perhaps forgotten the benefits of structured monoliths, or have sometimes overdone it with agility, which suggests a critical and learning retrospective.

Moderation: Frank Buschmann
Panelists: Isabel Bär, Zoe Lopez-Latorre, Carola Lilienthal, Xin Yao

Target Audience: Software Practitioners
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
The motto of OOP 2024 has many facets. Expanding horizons means understanding and taking advantage of new opportunities that arise from technological progress or societal challenges. For example, on Large Language Models, Sustainability, and the Metaverse. Expanding horizons also means taking responsibility and not blindly applying new technologies. For example, AI and data analytics have a direct impact on our future life and social interaction. With all the consequences, good and bad. But broadening horizons also means reflecting on existing technologies and practices. In the course of the euphoria about microservices, for example, we have perhaps forgotten the advantages of the structured monolith too much, or have sometimes overdone it with agility. A critical and learning retrospective seems appropriate.
In this panel, we will examine the various aspects of the motto of OOP 2024 to give us all meaningful guiding thoughts for the exciting journey to expanding our horizons.

Frank Buschmann is a Senior Principal Engineer at Siemens Technology in Munich. His interests are in modern Software-Architecture and development approaches for industrial digitization.

Isabel Bär is a skilled professional with a Master's degree in Data Engineering from the Hasso-Plattner-Institute. She has made contributions in the field of AI software, focusing on areas like MLOps and Responsible AI. Beyond being a regular speaker at various conferences, she has also taken on the role of organizing conferences on Data and AI, showcasing her commitment to knowledge sharing and community building. Currently, she is working as a consultant in a German IT consulting company.

Dr. Carola Lilienthal ist Software-Architektin und Geschäftsführerin bei der WPS – Workplace Solutions GmbH und entwickelt seit mehr als 10 Jahren mit ihren Teams Software-Architekturen nach den Prinzipien des Domain Driven Design. Sie ist Autorin des Buchs "Langlebige Softwarearchitekturen", hat das Buch "Domain-Driven Design Distilled" von Vaughn Vernon ins Deutsche übersetzt und 2023 ihr neues Buch "Domain-Driven Transformation" veröffentlicht.

Mehr Inhalte dieses Speakers? Schaut doch mal bei sigs.de vorbei: https://www.sigs.de/autor/carola.lilienthal

Zoe is a digital sustainability and web performance engineer with 3 years of experience in the field. They have published user research and actionable advice for brands and advertisers, and they are currently running web performance and web energy consumption correlation research studies. Zoe is also a member of the Sustainable Web W3C Community Group, focused on web digital sustainability measurement and standards to offer actionable advice to developers. They are a contributor to the Web Sustainability Guidelines 1.0 Draft.

Zoe is passionate about using their skills to help businesses reduce their digital environmental impact. They believe that digital sustainability is an important issue that everyone should be aware of, and they are committed to raising awareness and sharing their knowledge with others.

Xin Yao is a sociotechnical architect, DDD evangelist and independent consultant. She believes that a product, domain and team-oriented architecture is the super glue to bind multiple agile teams navigating toward a common horizon. She’s spearheaded large-scale change initiatives in boundary-spanning architect roles, weaving together strategy, products, teams, systems, domains into coherent models to guide progress and reduce stress. She architects collective experiences in scale-ups and enterprises to unravel complexity and discover leverage points. In sociotechnical environments where a team’s cognitive capacity is under constant stress, she practices domain-driven design and facilitates collaborative modeling to help teams and organizations make sense, make decisions and make intuitive business software.

Frank Buschmann, Isabel Bär, Carola Lilienthal, Zoe Lopez-Latorre, Xin Yao
Raum 05
Frank Buschmann, Isabel Bär, Carola Lilienthal, Zoe Lopez-Latorre, Xin Yao
Raum 05
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, (Donnerstag, 01.Februar 2024)
11:00 - 11:45
Do 3.2
NEU: Planet Earth as Our Stakeholder – Finding Ways to a Green Future
NEU: Planet Earth as Our Stakeholder – Finding Ways to a Green Future

This talk is about my journey as a Scrum Master towards creating sustainable DevOps teams. I will share my learnings and inspire the audience to raise awareness on sustainability in their own teams and organizations.
We will have a look at IT (and our own work) through the generational lens, to discover how long-term thinking can reshape the way we look at our daily work and help us find strategies for making IT sustainable.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, IT Managers, Agile Professionals
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract:
Climate change is a significant threat to the future of life on earth and as I was looking for ways to become more sustainable, the idea started to grow that at work, in my own DevOps teams, we could also take the sustainability perspective. I dove into the subject of sustainable IT and started with a ‘Planet as a Stakeholder Retrospective’ for my Scrum Team in which we went over the Principles of Green Software Engineering. We discussed what steps our team could take to reduce the carbon footprint of our services.
Taking the sustainability perspective was a new approach for the team, but everyone agreed on its importance. During that session, the team estimated that optimizing our landscape and decommissioning legacy components could reduce our footprint by a significant percentage!
Just imagine: what if all DevOps teams would do that? I started to give workshops about ‘the Planet as a Stakeholder’, in which I help teams to look at their IT services through the sustainability lens and let them define the first steps forward.
In this talk I will share my experiences: failures, challenges, successes, and examples of practical steps that teams have already taken to reduce their carbon footprint.

Marjolein Pilon is a creative and energetic Scrum Master from the Netherlands, currently serving 2 teams at Alliander (a Dutch power grid operator). She is also passionate about Planet Earth (our most important stakeholder!) and is raising climate awareness in the IT and Agile community by giving trainings, workshops and talks about reducing the carbon footprint of IT.

Marjolein Pilon
Raum 02
Marjolein Pilon
Raum 02
Vortrag: Do 3.2
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14:30 - 15:30
Do 9.3
We shrink the cloud – CO2 consumption as DevOps team KPI
We shrink the cloud – CO2 consumption as DevOps team KPI

At Tchibo we wanted to reduce our server and energy consumption with our product development teams. But why would we care? We all like fast snappy development and test systems. And our shop needs to survive Black Friday’s shopping traffic. Annual Google Cloud consumption forecasts do not trigger us to consume less. But when we started to show teams their related carbon dioxide footprint, we created a feedback loop that will help us to become better CO2-developers.
As developers, we have an impact - to program CO2 reduction.

Target Audience: Everyone, Developers, DevOps People
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract:
We will present the idea and first measurements on the server side. The planned client side measurements are still work in progress and very difficult to perform. Nevertheless is the client side induced CO2 consumption at large websites probably a large lever for reduction.

Mehr Inhalte dieses Speakers? Schaut doch mal bei sigs.de vorbei: https://www.sigs.de/autor/johannes.mainusch

Gründer und Mitmacher bei kommitment. Liebhaber von Röhrenradios und Fahrrädern. Am liebsten mit leichtem Gepäck in Europa unterwegs. Coded gern in typescript und go, arbeitet aber meistens mit nicht deterministischen Prozessoren in Management-Meetings. Mag Labskaus und Chaos.

Mehr Inhalte dieses Speakers? Schaut doch mal bei sigs.de vorbei:  https://www.sigs.de/autor/johannes.mainusch

Zoe is a digital sustainability and web performance engineer with 3 years of experience in the field. They have published user research and actionable advice for brands and advertisers, and they are currently running web performance and web energy consumption correlation research studies. Zoe is also a member of the Sustainable Web W3C Community Group, focused on web digital sustainability measurement and standards to offer actionable advice to developers. They are a contributor to the Web Sustainability Guidelines 1.0 Draft.

Zoe is passionate about using their skills to help businesses reduce their digital environmental impact. They believe that digital sustainability is an important issue that everyone should be aware of, and they are committed to raising awareness and sharing their knowledge with others.

Johannes Mainusch, Zoe Lopez-Latorre
Raum 04a
Johannes Mainusch, Zoe Lopez-Latorre
Raum 04a
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