Conference Program

Please note:
On this site, there is only displayed the English speaking sessions of the OOP 2022 Digital. You can find all conference sessions, including the German speaking ones, here.

The times given in the conference program of OOP 2022 Digital correspond to Central European Time (CET).

By clicking on "EVENT MERKEN" within the lecture descriptions you can arrange your own schedule. You can view your schedule at any time using the icon in the upper right corner.

Track: Half Day Tutorial

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  • Montag
    31.01.
, (Montag, 31.Januar 2022)
10:00 - 13:00
Mo 10
Limitiert Timing in Testing
Timing in Testing

Today we must deal with shorter time-to-market, increasing complexity and more agility while keeping quality and other key system properties high.

To address these challenges the right timing in testing is critical but often not explicitly tackled. Therefore, in this interactive tutorial we reflect on our current approach on timing in testing, investigate and discuss needed strategies, tactics, and practices in different areas, and share experiences and lessons learned to improve timing in testing – because it is time to act now!

Maximum number of participants: 50

Target Audience: Test Architects, Test Engineers, Product Owners, Quality Managers, Software Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge about testing and quality engineering
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Today we must deal with shorter time-to-market, increasing complexity and more agility while keeping quality and other key system properties high. Our test systems increase in size, volume, flexibility, velocity, complexity, and unpredictability. Additionally, digitalization requires more than just a face lift in testing.

To address these challenges the right timing in testing (“when to do what kind of testing and how?”) is critical, but often not explicitly tackled. Therefore, in this interactive tutorial we reflect on our current approach on timing in testing, investigate and discuss needed strategies, tactics, and practices in different areas, and share experiences and lessons learned to improve timing in testing – because it is time to act now!

Some of the areas in testing that are covered in the tutorial are:

  • When to do what kind of testing in the lifecycle – agile, lean, DevOps, and beyond
  • Testing too early vs. too late – risks and opportunities
  • Test automation and the test pyramid – shift-left, shift-right
  • When to stop testing – test exit criteria
  • Repetition in testing – regression testing
Peter Zimmerer is a Principal Key Expert Engineer at Siemens AG, Technology, in Munich, Germany. For more than 30 years he has been working in the field of software testing and quality engineering. He performs consulting, coaching, and training on test management and test engineering practices in real-world projects and drives research and innovation in this area. As ISTQB® Certified Tester Full Advanced Level he is a member of the German Testing Board (GTB). Peter has authored several journal and conference contributions and is a frequent speaker at international conferences.
Peter Zimmerer
Peter Zimmerer
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10:00 - 13:00
Mo 12
Agile Requirements Engineering - Best Practices
Agile Requirements Engineering - Best Practices

This tutorial introduces to agile requirements engineering. The half day delivers practical guidance from our projects across different industries. While being based on the IREB agile RE primer curriculum, it has more practical focus and avoids agile basics and theory. Yet, participants are eligible to IREB certification. We give practical tips for designing agile requirements processes. Attendees will learn how to combine needs of systematic requirements engineering with agile principles. Special focus is given to connect RE with agile project management and with testing. A hands-on case study shows practical usage of agile RE.

Target Audience: Project Managers, Architects, Analysts, Requirements Engineers, Product Owners, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Agile projects need agile requirements engineering. Innovations in increasingly complex systems under cost pressure and in global competition demand for continuous alignment towards value and costs. The key to value delivery is requirements. They are no longer "collected" but must be developed in a targeted manner with suitable interest groups. Requirements are not frozen at an early stage but must be flexibly addressed throughout the project and product. However, agile requirements engineering is difficult to implement, especially in critical systems because of complex dependencies, growing quality requirements and diverse coordination processes.

Agile requirements engineering is not just a trivial priority setting. Leaving our some requirements when time and budget are scarce does not work in critical systems. Design thinking and team-based decision-making are nice for small applications, but hardly scale in larger industrial projects. Describing requirements vaguely and hoping that they become clear in the course of the project has already ruined many projects. Agile requirements engineering in critical and compliant context must combine the needs of classic requirements engineering with the flexibility of agile action.

This tutorial introduces to agile requirements engineering. It offers many practical examples from our industry projects when introducing agility. The training considers the IREB agile RE primer curriculum, however with more practical focus from many agile projects across industries. Participants are eligible to IREB certification. We give practical tips for designing agile requirements processes.

This begins with a value-oriented elaboration of the actual need. Then we look at techniques like Kano model, planning poker, design thinking, Kanban etc. In an industry case study, we present experiences and benefits of agile requirements engineering in a medical technology project with Siemens Healthineers. In particular, we use concrete examples and industry experience to show how agile requirements engineering is implemented in practice. This allowed us to reduce the costs for reworking by about 30%. The experience gained can be transferred to other projects and environments.

As a product manager or project manager, you will learn how to merge systematic requirements engineering with agile principles. As a successful requirements engineer or system analyst, you will learn how to use and scale agile techniques for requirements engineering.

Christof Ebert is managing director at Vector Consulting Services. He supports clients around the world in agile transformations. Before he had been working for ten years in global senior management positions. A trusted advisor and a member of several of industry boards, he is a professor at the University of Stuttgart and at Sorbonne in Paris. He authored several books including "Requirements Engineering" published by dPunkt and in China by Motor Press. He is serving on the editorial Boards of "IEEE Software" and "Journal of Systems and Software (JSS)".
Christof Ebert
Christof Ebert
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10:00 - 13:00
Mo 13
Introduction to Functional Programming
Introduction to Functional Programming

Functional programming is the future of software development. As software gets ever more complex, unintended side effects flourish - you push on one side, and something unexpected squirts out the other. Functional programming cuts down on complexity through high-level abstractions and avoids unintended side effects through pure functions. The result is simple and elegant code that captures the essence of the problem you're trying to solve. Fortunately, functional programming is easy to learn, and this tutorial will get you started.

Target audience: Architects, Developers
Prerequisites: none
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract
Functional programming is the logical continuation of object-oriented programming: OOP managed to encapsulate mutable state with the goal of ultimately eliminating it one day, and functional programming finally realizes that vision. Language implementations have been mature and robust for many years now, and the practical functional languages - Haskell, OCaml, Scala, Clojure, F#, Racket, Erlang, Elixir, Swift - all have thriving communities and ecosystems. Moreover, decades of experience and research teaching functional programming have produced effective didactic approaches that enable anyone into programming to easily get into FP. The time to get started is now!

Michael Sperber is CEO of Active Group in Tübingen, Germany. Mike specializes in functional programming and has been an internationally recognized expert in the field: He has spoken at the top conferences in programming languages, authored many papers on the subject as well as several books. Moreover, he is an expert on teaching programming.
Michael Sperber
Michael Sperber
Vortrag: Mo 13
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 14
Limitiert Security Games – Playfully Improve your Security
Security Games – Playfully Improve your Security

Security is an important topic, especially when developing software. But it is seen as complex and is holding everyone back, often put off until the end and delegated to an external person or group.

To be effective security needs to be a continuous part of the development process and to involve the whole team.

Security games can help to achieve this. They involve the whole team and facilitate the learning and application of security principles. They offer a way to integrate expert knowledge and make security less scary, maybe even fun.

Maximum number of participants: 50

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leaders, Testers, Security Experts
Prerequisites: General interest in security, basic development experience
Level: Basic

Claudius Link is working in IT since 1994 in roles from system and network administration, support, software development, development manager to information security officer.
During this time he worked in different domains. Ranging from medical devices and laboratory systems, numerical simulations, transportation, financial industry, through security software and as information security officer for a medium sized subsidiary of a global enterprise.
Currently he is self-employed, promoting human centred security.
Matthias Altmann is a software developer and IT security expert at Micromata GmbH, where he and his colleagues oversee and develop the IT security area. He is also co-founder and organizer of the IT Security Meetup Kassel, a network of IT security enthusiasts dedicated to professional exchange on the topic. More information on his blog: https://secf00tprint.github.io/blog
Claudius Link, Matthias Altmann
Claudius Link, Matthias Altmann
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 16
From Requirements to Outcomes: Value Modeling, Experimentation and AI/ML
From Requirements to Outcomes: Value Modeling, Experimentation and AI/ML

Traditionally, requirements were used as a means to communicate between customers and development organizations. Unfortunately, requirements suffer from many limitations.

An alternative approach is to focus on outcomes and to use value modeling as a mechanism to quantitatively define the desired outcomes. This value model can then be used for experimentation by humans using DevOps and A/B testing or using machine learning models for automated experimentation.

The tutorial provides introduction of the topics and exercises.

Target Audience: Architects, Product Managers, Senior Developers, Business Leaders
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Jan Bosch is professor at Chalmers University Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden and director of the Software Center (www.software-center.se), a strategic partner-funded collaboration between 17 large European companies (including Ericsson, Volvo Cars, Volvo Trucks, Saab Defense, Scania, Siemens and Bosch) and five universities focused on digitalization. Earlier, he worked as Vice President Engineering Process at Intuit Inc where he also led Intuit's Open Innovation efforts and headed the central mobile technologies team. Before Intuit, he was head of the Software and Application Technologies Laboratory at Nokia Research Center, Finland. Prior to joining Nokia, he headed the software engineering research group at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. He received a MSc degree from the University of Twente, The Netherlands, and a PhD degree from Lund University, Sweden. His research activities include digitalisation, evidence-based development, business ecosystems, artificial intelligence and machine/deep learning, software architecture, software product families and software variability management. He is the author of several books including "Design and Use of Software Architectures: Adopting and Evolving a Product Line Approach" published by Pearson Education (Addison-Wesley & ACM Press) and “Speed, Data and Ecosystems: Excelling in a Software-Driven World” published by Taylor and Francis, editor of several books and volumes and author of hundreds of research articles. He is editor for Journal of Systems and Software as well as Science of Computer Programming, chaired several conferences as general and program chair, served on numerous program committees and organised countless workshops. Jan is a fellow member of the International Software Product Management Association (ISPMA) and a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Science. Jan serves on the boards of IVER, Peltarion and Burt Intelligence and on the advisory boards of Assia Inc. in Redwood City, CA and Pure Systems GmbH (Germany). Earlier he was chairman of the board of Auqtus, Fidesmo and Remente. In the startup space, Jan is an angel investor in several startup companies. He also runs a boutique consulting firm, Boschonian AB, that offers its clients support around the implications of digitalization including the management of R&D and innovation. For more information see his website: www.janbosch.com.
Helena Holmström Olsson is a professor of computer science at Malmö University, Sweden, and principal investigator/senior researcher in the aforementioned Software Center with expertise in AI and data-driven development. Over the years, she has run projects focusing on feature experimentation, A/B testing, data-driven development practices and data for ML/DL model design and development. She is the supervisor of several PhD students in the area of data-driven development and AI Engineering. In addition, her university has a well established program related to the internet of things (IoT) as well as a research school on data driven systems.
Jan Bosch, Helena Holmström Olsson
Jan Bosch, Helena Holmström Olsson
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 17
Limitiert Can We Leverage The Agile Manifesto To Reduce Our Carbon Footprint?
Can We Leverage The Agile Manifesto To Reduce Our Carbon Footprint?

Do you know that some forecasts project that in 2030 IT will account for 21% of all energy consumption? So, if we do not change the way we implement software, we will contribute to the increase in the carbon footprint. This means it is about time to take another look at how agile development can help decrease energy consumption.

In this workshop, we'll explore how the agile principles can guide us to more sustainability, and we'll provide you with concrete ideas for increasing sustainability in your product development.

Maximum number of participants: 100

Target Audience: Developers, Managers, Scrum Master, Product Owners, Coaches, ...
Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in agile would be helpful
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
The Agile Manifesto captures "better ways of developing software" yet, could this better way also take the environmental, economic, and social footprints of your software into account?

Software lifecycle creates direct and indirect carbon emissions: it has a footprint, worsening environmental problems. So, this session tries to provide the first answers to "how can the agile principles contribute to or guide sustainability?" In this workshop, we want to examine how the principles of the Agile Manifesto can provide guidance for implementing sustainability in IT.

In this workshop, we will explore the impact of the agile principles on sustainability, and how a greater awareness can change our current way of working for providing our contribution to addressing climate change.

Jutta Eckstein arbeitet weltweit als Business-Coach, Change-Manager & Beraterin. Ihr Fokus liegt auf unternehmensweiter Agilität in großen & verteilten Organisationen. Sie war von 2003-2007 im Vorstand der AgileAlliance. Sie hat einen M.A. in Business Coaching & Change Management, einen Dipl.-Ing. in Product-Engineering & ist als Immissionsschutzbeauftragte (Umweltschutz) zertifiziert. Jutta wurde 2011 von der Computerwoche in die Top 100 der bedeutendsten Persönlichkeiten der Deutschen IT gewählt.
Having worked as an Agile Coach/Software Engineer for the United Nations, Dr. Claudia Melo is now Director of Engineering and Tech Organizational Design at Loft and Advisory board member at Mulheres na Tecnologia (/MNT). Over the past 20 years, Claudia has joined different organizations with a focus on software engineering, connecting delivery, research and education. She conducts extensive work in Agile Methods/DevOps and Organization Design in collaboration with companies, universities, entrepreneurs, government and international organisations. She was ThoughtWorks’ Global Head of Tech Learning Development, member of the Technology Advisory Board, and CTO for Latin America. Since 2016, she has been working on ICT for Sustainability topics, aligned to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Claudia received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of São Paulo (USP), in collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). Besides contributing to scientific research, books, and industry reports, in 2015, she received the USP Outstanding Thesis Award.
Claudia can be reached @claudia_melo | https://www.linkedin.com/in/claudiamelo/ | https://claudiamelo.org/en/about/midia-e-imprensa/
Jutta Eckstein, Claudia Melo
Jutta Eckstein, Claudia Melo
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 18
The KISS Architecture Model
The KISS Architecture Model

There are several architecture models with prescribed views and notations. The Keep It Short & Simple architecture model is different. We create pieces of documentation iff they benefit stakeholders. We do so using drawing tools, not modeling tools. We say no to BDUF and yes to Important Design Up Front. We follow 7 tips for creating diagrams that are expressive, not ambiguous, and help you to successfully understand and evolve them, and build a system from them. We complement the design diagrams that describe structure and behavior with ADRs.

Target Audience: Developers and anyone else who plays the role of architect.
Prerequisites: If you've ever developed software, you're ready.
Level: Basic

Extended Abstract
Do you create or use architecture documentation? Have you ever been confused and wondered about the meaning of a box or arrow in a design diagram? Do you think architecture documentation is costly or time consuming? If your answer is yes to any of these questions, this tutorial has practical and valuable information for you. There are several proposed architecture models with prescribed views and notations. The Keep It Short and Simple architecture model is different. We create pieces of documentation if they benefit stakeholders. We do so primarily use drawing tools, not modelling tools. We say no to Big Design Up Front (BDUF) but say yes to Important Design Up Front (IDUF). We follow 7 guidelines for creating informal design diagrams that are expressive, not ambiguous, and effectively help you and others to successfully understand them, evolve them, and build a system from them. Finally, we complement the essential design diagrams that describe structure and behaviour with architecture decision records (ADRs) for the important design decisions.

In the tutorial we look at several example architectures from real world systems. Most are good examples, but we also turn a critical eye on known products' architecture diagrams with several opportunities for improvement. Participants can also share their experience throughout. The tutorial also includes a fun online game and a hands-on exercise.

Tutorial minutiae include: what is the minimum architecture documentation expected, what design decisions are important enough to deserve an ADR, examples of drawing tools, who should be responsible for architecture documentation, how to complement structural diagrams with behavior diagrams.

Paulo Merson has been programming in the small and in the large for over 30 years. He's a dev at the Brazilian Federal Court of Accounts, adjunct faculty in the Masters of Software Engineering program at Carnegie Mellon University, and faculty in the University of Brasilia masters program in Applied Computing. He often delivers professional training to fellow devs in the US and Europe. His speaking experience also includes talks at DDD Europe, OOP, XP Agile, JavaOne, SPLASH/OOPSLA, SATURN, and lectures to grad students in different universities. Paulo holds a BSc in CS from University of Brasilia and a Master of Software Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.
Paulo Merson
Paulo Merson
Vortrag: Mo 18
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 19
Limitiert Beyond Psychological Safety - Tools From Psychology For Enabling Intelligent, High-Performing Teams
Beyond Psychological Safety - Tools From Psychology For Enabling Intelligent, High-Performing Teams

Despite being hyped in the Agile community because of Google discovering its importance, psychological safety alone is not enough. It is a necessary but not sufficient precondition for successful intelligent and high-performing teams. But what else is needed? This workshop will present additional research as well as tools used by psychologists that boost team intelligence and performance and explore the potential for their use in their teams. Participants will have the opportunity to try some tools and learn how to design their own.

Maximum number of participants: 30

Target Audience: Coaches, Scrum Masters
Prerequisites: English, basic knowledge of statistics
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Despite being hyped in the Agile community because of Google discovering its importance, psychological safety alone is not enough. It is a necessary but not sufficient precondition for successful intelligent and high-performing teams. But what else is needed? This workshop will present additional research as well as tools used by psychologists that boost team intelligence and performance and explore the potential for their use in Scrum teams.

After attending this workshop, the attendee will

  • have a basic understanding of the psychological concepts of team intelligence and performance
  • go beyond the buzzwords to understand where and how psychological safety fits into these larger concept
  • have working knowledge of a validated framework for designing exercises to increase team performance
  • have hands-on experience with psychological tools and techniques that can be used to implement and support the exercises
  • have a toolkit of techniques that they can immediately use to help their teams improve how they work together
A quiet and reserved researcher and practitioner, Joseph Pelrine is considered by cognoscenti to be one of the pioneers and top experts on Agile methods. He has spent over 25 years defining and refining processes to help some of the world’s most well-known companies improve their ability to satisfy the needs of their customers. As a psychologist, his focus on people and his experience in applying leading-edge techniques from social complexity and psychology to process optimisation goes far beyond the domain of software development and extends to the whole organisation.
Joseph Pelrine
Joseph Pelrine
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