Konferenzprogramm

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Thema: Requirements Engineering

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  • Montag
    31.01.
  • Mittwoch
    02.02.
  • Donnerstag
    03.02.
, (Montag, 31.Januar 2022)
10:00 - 13:00
Mo 12
Agile Requirements Engineering - Best Practices
Agile Requirements Engineering - Best Practices

This tutorial introduces to agile requirements engineering. The half day delivers practical guidance from our projects across different industries. While being based on the IREB agile RE primer curriculum, it has more practical focus and avoids agile basics and theory. Yet, participants are eligible to IREB certification. We give practical tips for designing agile requirements processes. Attendees will learn how to combine needs of systematic requirements engineering with agile principles. Special focus is given to connect RE with agile project management and with testing. A hands-on case study shows practical usage of agile RE.

Target Audience: Project Managers, Architects, Analysts, Requirements Engineers, Product Owners, Software Engineers
Prerequisites: None
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
Agile projects need agile requirements engineering. Innovations in increasingly complex systems under cost pressure and in global competition demand for continuous alignment towards value and costs. The key to value delivery is requirements. They are no longer "collected" but must be developed in a targeted manner with suitable interest groups. Requirements are not frozen at an early stage but must be flexibly addressed throughout the project and product. However, agile requirements engineering is difficult to implement, especially in critical systems because of complex dependencies, growing quality requirements and diverse coordination processes.

Agile requirements engineering is not just a trivial priority setting. Leaving our some requirements when time and budget are scarce does not work in critical systems. Design thinking and team-based decision-making are nice for small applications, but hardly scale in larger industrial projects. Describing requirements vaguely and hoping that they become clear in the course of the project has already ruined many projects. Agile requirements engineering in critical and compliant context must combine the needs of classic requirements engineering with the flexibility of agile action.

This tutorial introduces to agile requirements engineering. It offers many practical examples from our industry projects when introducing agility. The training considers the IREB agile RE primer curriculum, however with more practical focus from many agile projects across industries. Participants are eligible to IREB certification. We give practical tips for designing agile requirements processes.

This begins with a value-oriented elaboration of the actual need. Then we look at techniques like Kano model, planning poker, design thinking, Kanban etc. In an industry case study, we present experiences and benefits of agile requirements engineering in a medical technology project with Siemens Healthineers. In particular, we use concrete examples and industry experience to show how agile requirements engineering is implemented in practice. This allowed us to reduce the costs for reworking by about 30%. The experience gained can be transferred to other projects and environments.

As a product manager or project manager, you will learn how to merge systematic requirements engineering with agile principles. As a successful requirements engineer or system analyst, you will learn how to use and scale agile techniques for requirements engineering.

Christof Ebert is managing director at Vector Consulting Services. He supports clients around the world in agile transformations. Before he had been working for ten years in global senior management positions. A trusted advisor and a member of several of industry boards, he is a professor at the University of Stuttgart and at Sorbonne in Paris. He authored several books including "Requirements Engineering" published by dPunkt and in China by Motor Press. He is serving on the editorial Boards of "IEEE Software" and "Journal of Systems and Software (JSS)".
Christof Ebert
Christof Ebert
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14:00 - 17:00
Mo 16
From Requirements to Outcomes: Value Modeling, Experimentation and AI/ML
From Requirements to Outcomes: Value Modeling, Experimentation and AI/ML

Traditionally, requirements were used as a means to communicate between customers and development organizations. Unfortunately, requirements suffer from many limitations.

An alternative approach is to focus on outcomes and to use value modeling as a mechanism to quantitatively define the desired outcomes. This value model can then be used for experimentation by humans using DevOps and A/B testing or using machine learning models for automated experimentation.

The tutorial provides introduction of the topics and exercises.

Target Audience: Architects, Product Managers, Senior Developers, Business Leaders
Prerequisites: None
Level: Basic

Jan Bosch is professor at Chalmers University Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden and director of the Software Center (www.software-center.se), a strategic partner-funded collaboration between 17 large European companies (including Ericsson, Volvo Cars, Volvo Trucks, Saab Defense, Scania, Siemens and Bosch) and five universities focused on digitalization. Earlier, he worked as Vice President Engineering Process at Intuit Inc where he also led Intuit's Open Innovation efforts and headed the central mobile technologies team. Before Intuit, he was head of the Software and Application Technologies Laboratory at Nokia Research Center, Finland. Prior to joining Nokia, he headed the software engineering research group at the University of Groningen, The Netherlands. He received a MSc degree from the University of Twente, The Netherlands, and a PhD degree from Lund University, Sweden. His research activities include digitalisation, evidence-based development, business ecosystems, artificial intelligence and machine/deep learning, software architecture, software product families and software variability management. He is the author of several books including "Design and Use of Software Architectures: Adopting and Evolving a Product Line Approach" published by Pearson Education (Addison-Wesley & ACM Press) and “Speed, Data and Ecosystems: Excelling in a Software-Driven World” published by Taylor and Francis, editor of several books and volumes and author of hundreds of research articles. He is editor for Journal of Systems and Software as well as Science of Computer Programming, chaired several conferences as general and program chair, served on numerous program committees and organised countless workshops. Jan is a fellow member of the International Software Product Management Association (ISPMA) and a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Science. Jan serves on the boards of IVER, Peltarion and Burt Intelligence and on the advisory boards of Assia Inc. in Redwood City, CA and Pure Systems GmbH (Germany). Earlier he was chairman of the board of Auqtus, Fidesmo and Remente. In the startup space, Jan is an angel investor in several startup companies. He also runs a boutique consulting firm, Boschonian AB, that offers its clients support around the implications of digitalization including the management of R&D and innovation. For more information see his website: www.janbosch.com.
Helena Holmström Olsson is a professor of computer science at Malmö University, Sweden, and principal investigator/senior researcher in the aforementioned Software Center with expertise in AI and data-driven development. Over the years, she has run projects focusing on feature experimentation, A/B testing, data-driven development practices and data for ML/DL model design and development. She is the supervisor of several PhD students in the area of data-driven development and AI Engineering. In addition, her university has a well established program related to the internet of things (IoT) as well as a research school on data driven systems.
Jan Bosch, Helena Holmström Olsson
Jan Bosch, Helena Holmström Olsson
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, (Mittwoch, 02.Februar 2022)
11:00 - 11:45
Mi 6.2
Vom Wertstrom zur User-Story – Journey Mapping als hilfreiches Werkzeug
Vom Wertstrom zur User-Story – Journey Mapping als hilfreiches Werkzeug

Der Vortrag beschreibt, wie man von einem operativen Wertstrom (z. B. Beantragung eines Kredits) zur Ableitung von Features kommt und diese in MVP (Minimum Viable Products) und Folgereleases priorisiert.

Wir schauen uns dabei Werkzeuge, wie z. B. Customer Journeys, Feature Mapping, Ideation und Priorisierungsmethoden an. Das Ganze wird anhand eines Beispiels/Fallstudie aus einem unserer großen Delivery-Projekte aufgezeigt.

Zielpublikum: UX, Architekt:innen, Entwickler:innen, Projektleiter:innen, Projektmanager:innen, Product Owner, Product Manager
Voraussetzungen: Basiswissen im agilen Requirements Engineering
Schwierigkeitsgrad: Anfänger

Extended Abstract

Der Vortrag beschreibt, wie man von einem operativen Wertstrom (z. B. Beantragung eines Kredits) zur Ableitung von Features kommt und diese in MVP (Minimum Viable Products) und Folgereleases priorisiert.

Wir starten damit, uns anzuschauen, was ein operativer Wertstrom ist und warum es vorteilhaft ist, sich nach diesen zu organisieren. Im nächsten Schritt leiten wir aus diesem Wertstrom eine Customer Journey Map und gehen auf Werkzeuge, wie z. B. Personas und Empathy Maps ein. Danach leiten wir aus der Customer Journey eine Feature Map ab und gehen hier auf verschieden Ideation-Tools ein. Zuletzt zeigen wir, wie man aus der Feature Map das MVP und weitere Releases bestimmen kann, hier gehen wir auf verschiedene Priorisierungsmethoden ein.

Der Vortrag soll aufzeigen, wie man in der Entwicklung von neuen Produkten vom Wertstrom mithilfe von Customer Journeys und Feature Mapping zum MVP kommt. Das Ganze wird anhand eines Beispiels/Fallstudie aus einem unserer großen Delivery-Projekte aufgezeigt.

Sebastian Straube ist leidenschaftlicher Agilist. Sein Fokus liegt im agilen Produktmanagement. Er beschäftigt sich sehr stark mit den Themen Produktstrategie und Product Discovery. Bevor er Agile Coach wurde, war er selbst Produktmanager und hat E-Commerce Anwendungen sowie innovative mobile Apps entwickelt.
Kim Reutters große Leidenschaft liegt in der agilen Entwicklung digitaler Produkte. Ihr Fokus liegt im Product Ownership und dem Aufbau innovationsgetriebener und Kundenwert-maximierender Teams. Autonomie und Selbstorganisation sind für sie die zentralen Bausteine des agilen Mindsets. Kim Reutters große Leidenschaft liegt in der agilen Entwicklung digitaler Produkte. Ihr Fokus liegt im Product Ownership und dem Aufbau innovationsgetriebener und Kundenwert-maximierender Teams. Autonomie und Selbstorganisation sind für sie die zentralen Bausteine des agilen Mindsets.
Sebastian Straube, Kimberley Reutter
Sebastian Straube, Kimberley Reutter
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, (Donnerstag, 03.Februar 2022)
11:00 - 11:45
Do 8.2
What Do You Mean?
What Do You Mean?

The world in which a software system lives is filled with meaning. The structure, concepts and names that inform the code, its changes and the mental models held by developers are expressions of meaning. The very act of development is an exercise in meaning — it's discovery, its formulation, its communication.
But just because we are immersed in concepts of meaning from an early age, and just because the daily work of software development is about wrangling meaning, that doesn't mean we're necessarily good at it. Let's talk about what we mean.

Target Audience: Developers, Architects, UX, Product Owners
Prerequisites: No specific prerequisites
Level: Advanced

Extended Abstract
"It's just semantics." How many conversations about philosophy, politics and programming are derailed by this thought-stopping comment?
Semantics is all about meaning. If there is one thing we struggle with and need to get better at, it is the search for and clarification of meaning. The world in which a software system lives is filled with meaning. The structure, concepts and names that inform the code, its changes and the mental models held by developers are expressions of meaning. The very act of development is an exercise in meaning — it's discovery, its formulation, its communication. Paradigms, processes and practices are anchored in different ways of thinking about and arriving at meaning.
But just because we are immersed in concepts of meaning from an early age, and just because the daily work of software development is about wrangling meaning, and just because it's just semantics, that doesn't mean we're necessarily good at it. It takes effort and insight. Let's talk about what we mean.

Kevlin Henney is an independent consultant, speaker, writer, reviewer, and trainer. His development interests are in programming, people and practice. He is co-author of “A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing” and “On Patterns and Pattern Languages”, two volumes in the Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture series, and editor of “97 Things Every Programmer Should Know” and co-editor of “97 Things Every Java Programmer Should Know”.
Kevlin Henney
Kevlin Henney
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