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SOFTWARE MEETS BUSINESS:
Die Konferenz für Software-Architekturen

München, 01. - 05. Februar 2016

Konferenz

Vortrag: Do 4.3
Datum: Do, 04.02.2016
Uhrzeit: 14:30 - 15:30
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Failure Is Not an Option: SW Engineering for Digitalizing the Industry

Uhrzeit: 14:30 - 15:30
Vortrag: Do 4.3

 

The trend towards Digitalization is changing the role of software in industrial systems. Architectures of such systems are characterized by decentralization, extreme dynamics, connectivity and interaction between embedded things, and an almost unbounded flexibility. Yet, fundamental properties like real-time performance, highest availability and functional safety must not be degraded – failure is not an option for industrial systems. This talk outlines a set of integrated, software development practices that balances these conflicting forces.

Target Audience: Architects, Developers, Project Leader, Manager, Decision Makers
Prerequisites: Project experience
Level: Practicing

You will learn:
Learn how the practices aim to get certainty about essential systems’ properties before the systems are actually built and to establish a safety net for strictly quality-oriented development.
How the practices utilize software engineering technologies like model-driven development and testing, performance engineering, architecture simulation, software analytics, architecture and software ecosystem management.

Extended Abstract:
The Internet of Things, Cyber-Physical Systems, and the trend towards Digitalization are changing the role of software in industrial systems – digitalization has become the main source of new business opportunities and is the driving force of rapidly increasing innovation speed. Robots cooperate with human workers; factories self-organize their production; high-speed trains are flexibly configured according to volatile mobility demands; buildings adapt to their inhabitants’ preferences, and smart grids self-manage demand and response of energy.
Architectures of such systems are characterized by massive decentralization, extreme dynamics, connectivity and interaction between myriads of embedded things, the availability of massive amounts of data, and an almost unbounded flexibility. The separation between development and operations of such systems disappears. Yet, the industrial systems of this new world must not degrade the “traditional” properties that made them so successful in the past decades: real-time performance, functional safety, highest availability, and resilience – in some cases with up to 50 years of continuous operation.
This conflict between the demand for new technologies and an increased development speed on the one hand, and the absolute must of guaranteeing fundamental system properties on the other hand imposes a challenge on software development. Failure is simply not an option for industrial systems, there is no undoing operations in the physical world. In such situations it is not just money that is burned. Often human life is endangered when physical processes are no longer under control and essential infrastructure of our modern society becomes unavailable. It makes a difference if a social platform fails, or if we have shortage of clean water or a power blackout in a larger region. This difference in effects makes a blind adoption of modern development practices, like feature-oriented development and continuous delivery, unfeasible for the development of industrial systems, nevertheless a strong demand for increased agility and leanness persists.
This talk outlines a set of integrated, industrial-grade, software development practices that balances these conflicting forces. In a nutshell, the practices aim to get certainty about essential systems properties before the systems are actually built and to establish a safety net for strictly quality-oriented development. These practices include modern software engineering technologies like model-driven development and testing, performance engineering, architecture simulation, software analytics, architecture and software ecosystem management. Essentially they focus on guiding, rather than controlling, software development to build software that sustainably contributes to an industrial-grade Digitalization business – since failure is not an option!